Skip to main content

Full text of "73 Magazine (May 1992)"

See other formats


Easy Projects 
ou Can Build 

ow-Cost 
Component 
Analyzer 

Log-Periodic 
Dipole For 
2 Meters 

Battery Watchdog 

'3 Reviews 
Yaesu FT-26 HT 

MFJ-247 
Antenna Analyzer 

Daiwa PS-304 



ower 



ply 



I , ■ ■ » *— i ■ 





if 

tr 



MAY 1992 

ISSUE §380 

USA $2,95 

CAN $3.95 

A WGI Publication 
International Edition 




III il ..i 

7^B20 ll 067? 



1" 






• 






W ■ "^ 





M^2|E| 


til 


1 VQ^KVik^ 




>rw 


ft! ILJ f J sgfl 






pM^H Br" B^^^^B ^^D^4^B 


i »l» 1*1 , 1 



ft 

ft^S 



I 






■— 



5CCIX=!2En 



* 



,jji 



m 



' 



I 






:::: 



Six Radios In One! 

ICOMs 901A is the world s only 6-Band HF/VHF/UHF 
mobile radio— operated by a single remote control panel. 

Band Space To Grow Into! 

The basic 90LA is a dual-band (2 meter/440 MHz) with 
control panel, mic and speaker, In some areas of the country 
the popular bands are filling up fast. When you're ready to 
mates the jump to 220 MHz, lj gHfc, 10-meter, 6-meter, or 2- 
meter SSb— your 901A is ready, with a choice of add-on 
modules. There's even a wideband receiver!* 



UNDER 

SEAT 

MOUNT 




Speaker 



Contfol 
Panel 



Transceiver 




CONVENTIONAL 
MOUNT 



Control Panel 
& Transceiver 
Combi 




Attach Control Panel Anywhere! 

The bright, easy-toread liquid crystal control panel 
mounts anywhere— dash, door or visor— no tools, no holes. 
The panel can be easily detached and hidden to deter theft. 
The transceiver and additional band units stay out of sight, 
in the trunk or under a seat. 



TRUNK 
MOUNT 



Optional 
Band Units 

Optic na I 
EX-767 




#AM FM broadcast, aircraft, 137-550 IVTHj riqrrow FM 
Stereo FTVl broadcast available. 2 speakers required 



I! 



II 




IC -901 A 



Exclusive fiber Optic Technology! 

Transceiver and band units are linked to the control panel 
by a single thin fiber optic strand— no awkward cables, protects 
against interference from the car engine. 

Full Duplex & Cross Band Repeat! 

While operating on one band, monitor or scan a second. 
Both are clearly displayed on the front panel. Cross Band 
Repeat lets you control your 901A remotely with a handheld, 
using the vehicle unit as a super signal booster! 

Program & Memory Scan & More! 

See vour ICOM dealer for a complete list of 901A features... 
or call the ICOM Brochure Hotline at 1-800-999-9877. 



Transceiver 




Control 
Panel 



jp QrYl A T he P bile s y_ stem of 



The Future . . Today 




ICOM America, Inc., 2380-11 6th Ave. N.E.. Bellevue, WA 98004 
Customer Service Hotline (206) 454-7619 

AJI siaicd suecifHJiiinuih .iif subject 10 change withoul notice- ot abilgalian. All ICOM radios 
sign ficanHy exceed f CG /eguiai»ons limiting, souncws emissions. &D1A392 





the 

* READS! SERVICE CARD 









Simply connect one of our fully automatic phone patches to 
your base station radio, Suddenly your mobile and HT radios 
can initiate and receive telephone calls without any assistance 

MODEL CS-700: An economical simplex sampling patch. The operator is in 

full control at all times. User selectable operating modes: VOX Enhanced 
Sampling or VOX Controlled Sampling. Features include a 9 Phone number 
Speed-dialer; Automatic Sample Window Set-up and more. 

PRIVATE PATCH V: Offers four user selectable operating modes; 
1 . Simplex VOX Enhanced Sampling 2. Simplex VOX 
3. Semi-Duplex 4 + Repeater Maker 

In the Simplex VOX mode, Private Patch V can be used straight simplex or 
through remotely located repeaters and only requires Mic jack and ext 
speaker jack connections to the base radio. Features include a 90 Phone 
Number Speed-Dialer, Remote Base operation and more. Thousands are in 
use worldwide. 



Your 




\0* 




MODEL CS 800: A low cost patch that operates either Full or Semi Duplex. 
Plus has built-in Repeater Maker. Use with dual bander radios or connect to 
your existing repeater for Full Duplex patch. Also turns your radio into a 
powerful repeater system if desired. Other features include 9 Phone Number 
Speed-Dialer and more. 

MODEL 8200: Includes all features and modes of Model CS-800 plus 90 
Phone number Speed-Dialer, Remote Base Mode, DTMF Selective Calling 
(other tones are optionally available), remoteiy programmable access codes, 
and more, (Also available in desk top cabinet). This is the finest Full Duplex 
Patch/ Repeater Controller in the business!! 

All Models Also Include: Built-in user programming keyboard with digital 
readout display (All features and modes are user programmable) • Last 
Number Redial * Line in use detect * Call Waiting ■ Automatic 1-800 toll 
override • User programmable CW ID • Single or Multi-Digit Access/ 
Disconnect codes • Secret Toll Override Access Code • Hookflash • Fully 
Regenerated Tone or Pulse Dialing • Ringout sounds like a phone • Remotely 
controllable relay • Non-volatile memory • Lightning protection and the 
famous one year CSI Warranty. When you compare to brands C or I you will 
find there's simply no competition. 

Call or write for brochures and dealer information. 



Into 
Phone 





f 



PtfWfasta F*swflh V 



•i n.mmm Bm^NtlilUKIt 



* + 



i- i 











FIMA DUK.EZ ■ 



MA^PHnpt-lta. 



' — Rfljwatfti C*M«<ta/llrtifC*Wi!*l 



Connect Systems Inc. 

2064 Eastman Avenue #113 

Ventura, California 93003 

Phone (805) 642-7184 • FAX (805) 642-7271 



1(800)545-1349 



CIRCLE 12 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



ill ■ 






IJ Mu 1 1 JLl RlI^I I iflwlk/r* 



STANDARD BY WHICH 






BASE/REPEATER ANTENNAS 





X series 



X-500HNA DUAL-BAND REPEATER VERSION 



X-500NA DUAL-BAND REPEATER VERSION 




X-200A DUAL-BAND REPEATER VERSION 



X-50A 




DUAL-BAND REPEATER VERSION 




PART# 



FREQ 



GAIN(dB) 



PWR(W) 



LENGTH(FT) 



CONNECTOR 



WIND RATING 



ELEMENT PHASING 



X-500HNA 



2m/70cm 



8.3/1 1 .7 



200 



17.2 



N 



90 



2m:3-5/8X,70cm :8-5/8X 



X-500NA 



2m/70cm 



8.3/1 1 .7 



200 



17.2 



N 



90 



2m 3-5/8X t 70cm :8-5/8\ 



X-200A 



2m/70cm 



6.0/8.0 



200 



8.3 



UHF 



112.5 



2m 2-5/8X,70cm :4-5/8X 



X-50A 



2m/70cm 



4.5/7.2 



200 



5.6 



UHF 



135 



2m:6/8\,70cm:3-5/8X 




U series VHF/UHF MULTIBAND 



U-5000A 



PART# 



FREQ 




GAIN(dS) 



PWR(W) 



LENGTH (FT) 



CONNECTOR 



r IND RATING 



ELEMENT PHASING 



U-300A 



70cm/23cm 



8.6/13.2 



150 



8.3 



N 




70cm:4-5/8X, 
23cm:10-5/8X 




U-5000A 



2m/70cm 

/23cm 



4.5/8.3 
/1 1.7 



150 



6.0 



N 



135 



2m £/8X,70cm:3-5/8X r 
23cm:7-5/8X 









/ 



F series VHF/UHF MONOBAND 



F-23A 




-^^"i 



PART* 



FREQ GAIN(dB ) 



PWR(W) 



LENGTH (FT) 



CONNECTOR 



WIND RATING 



ELEMENT PHASING 



DP-GH62 



6m 



6.0 



200 



21.0 



UHF 



78 



2-5/831 



F-22A 



2m 



6.7 



200 



10.5 



UHF 



112 



2-7/831 



F-23A 



2m 



7.8 



200 



15.0 



UHF 



90 



3-5/8Jv 



F-142A 



1 1/4m 



5.5 



200 



6.0 



UHF 



110 



2-5/8X 



F-71 8A 



70cm 



11.5 



250 



15.0 



N 



90 



18-1/2X 



F-1230A 



23cm 



13.5 



100 



10.5 



N 



90 



25-1 IZk 



FEATURES 

- WIDE-BAND performance 

- VSWR 1.5:1 (nom.) 

- Factory adjusted, no tuning required 

- Weatherproof 

• Stainless steel radials & hardware 
-UPS shippable 



*F-718L:420~430MHz t F-718J:430~440MHz 



Rugged fiberglass radome(DP-GH62 thick-wall aluminum) 
Wind speed ratings in excess of 90MPH 



^W% 




RF PARTS 

1 320 16 Grand Avenue 
San Marcos CA 92069 







THE TEAM 

PUBLISHER EDITOR 
Wayne Green W2NSD/T 
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 
David CassidyNIGPH 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Bill Brown WB8ELK 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 
HopeCumer 

EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 

Sue Jewell 
Joyce SawteHe 
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
MikeBryceWBSVGE 
David CowhigWAILBP 
Michael GeierKBIUM 
Jim Gray W1XU/7 
Chuck Houghton WB6IGP 
Am i e Joh nson N 1 BAC 
Or. Marc Leavey WA3AJR 
Andy MacAII isler WA5ZIB 
Joe Moell K*OV 
Carole Perry WB2MGP 

ADVERTISING SALES 
REPRESENTATIVES 
Dan Harper 
Louise O'Su Eli van 
ADVERTISING COORDINATOR 
Sue Colbert 

1-G03-924~0058 
1^800-274-7373 
FAX (603) 924-8813 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 
VtkiVanValen 

GRAPHIC DESIGN 

Rachel Timper 
GRAPHIC SERVICES 
Ruth Benedict 
Dale Williams 
Theresa Verville 
TYPESETTING 
Linda Drew 
Steve Jewett 

GRAPHICS PHOTOGRAPHER 

DanCroteau 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Harvey Chandler 

To subscribe: 1-600-289-0386 

WAYNE GREEN. INC. 

Editorial Offices 
70 Route 202N 
Peterborough, NH 03458 
603-924-0058. FAX (603) 9244613 
Subscription Services 
1-800-289-0388 

Colorado/ Foreign Subscribers 
call 1-303-447-9330 

Reprints: The first copy of an article 
$3.00 (eaen additional eopy-$l .50). 
Write to 73 Amateur Radio Today, 70 
Route 202N. Peterborough, NH 
03456. 



73 A ma teur 



MAY 1992 
Issue #380 



Radio Today 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Build an LPDA . . . see page 14* 



FEATURES 



8 Poor Ham's Dynamic 
Component Analyzer 

Build your own circuit detective. 

KA1MHA 

14 Log Periodic Dipole Array 
for 2 Meters 

Wideband performance in a smaJI 
package. N2KLK 

18 QRP Sidetone Companion 

And part-time code practice oscillator. 
KISAZ 

20 The Copperback Beetle 

A new type of "bug." KISAZ 

26 Battery Watchdog 

Keeps your battery up to snuff. 

„„ WB«TCZf7 

30 Control Your Station by 
Computer 

Hardware and software interfaces for 
Kenwood rigs* WK2S 



46 DXpedition Lessons from Peter I 
and Bouvet Islands 

Helpful hints for your next exotic radio 
operation AJBN/LA6US 



REVIEWS 



25 TheMFJ-247 
Antenna Analyzer 

SWR analyzer with a buift-m frequency 
counter* .,..,*., + . WA4BLC 

38 LOGic Jr. and LOGic IJ Vers. 2.1 
Ham Logging Software 

Discover the versatility of a 
computerized logbook WA3USG 



DEPARTMENTS 



74 Above and Beyond 

72 Ad Index 

63 AskKaboom 
56 ATV 

82 Barter 'n' Buy 

64 Circuits 

65 Dealer Dl rectory 
17 Feedback Index 
58 Hams with Class 

77 Hamsats 
54 Homing In 

6 Letters 

4 Never Say Die 

66 New Products 
84 Propagation 
62 QRP 

7 QRX 

84 Random Output 

78 RTTY Loop 

80 73 International 

70 Special Events 

86 Uncle Wayne's 
Bookshelf 



42 The Daiwa PS-304 

A regulated power supply 

50 The Yaesu rr-26 

2 Meter Walkie 
Simplicity redefine*! 



N1GPH 



KB1UM 



Cover; What's wrong with this picture? The first person to write in with the correct answer gets 
a free year of 73. Drop a postcard ft? 73 Cover Question, 70 Route 202 North, Peterborough NH 
03456. Cover photo by K&fty O 'Dell. 



FEEDBACK... 
FEEDBACK! 

It's like being there— right 
here in our of flees! How? 
Just take ud vantage of out 
FEEDBACK card on page 
17. You'll notice a feedback 
number at the beginning of 
each article and column. 
We'd like you to rate what 
you read so that we can 
prim what rypes of things 
youlikebesl. And then 
we will draw one Feedback 
card each munth for afree 
subscription to 73 . 



\?m 



Editorial Offices 

70 Route 202N 

Peterborough NH 03458 

phone: 603-924-0058 



Advertising Offices 

70 Route 202N 

Peterborough NH 03458 

phone: 800-274-7373 



Circulation Offices 

70 Route 202N 

Peterborough NH 03458 

phone : 603-92 4-0058 



Manuscripts Contributions in the form of manuscripts with drawings and/or photographs are welcome 
and will be considered for possible publication. We can assume no responsibility for less or damage to 
any material . Pi ease enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope with each submission. Payment for the 
use of any unsolicited material will be made upon publication. A premium will be paid for accepted articles 
that have been submitted elect ronicaiiy (CompuServe pen 70310,775 Of MCI Mail " WGEPUB" or GEnie 
address "MAG 73") or on disk as an IBM-compatible ASCII file. You can also contact us at the 73 BBS at 
(603) 525-4438. 300 or 1200 baud. 8 data bits, no parity, one stop bit. All contributions should be directed 
to the 73 editorial offices. "How to Write for 73" guidelines are available upon request. US citizens must 
include their social security number with submitted manuscripts. 

73 Amateur Radio Today (ISSN 1 052-2522) is published monthly by Wayne Green Inc., 70 Route 202 
North, Peterborough, New Hampshire 03458 Enti re contents ©1992 by Wayne Green f no No part of this 
publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. For Subscription Services 
write 73 Amateur Radio Today. PO Box 56866. Boulder, CO 60322-8866, or call 1-800-269-0388. In CO 
call 1 -303-447-9330, The subscription rate is one year $24,97 h two years $39.97, Additional postage for 
Canada is $7.00 and for other foreign countries, $19.00 surface and $37.00 airmail per year. All foreign 
orders must be accompanied by payment is US funds. Second class postage paid at Peterborough, New 
Hampshire, and at additional mailing offices, Canadian second class mail registration number 9568. 
Canadian GST Registration #125393314. Microfilm Edition— University Microfilm, Ann Arbor, Ml 48106. 
Postmaster: send address changes to 73 Amateur Radio Today t PO Box 56866, Boulder. CO 80322- 
8866. 

Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC) membership applied for. 

Contract: Reading this fine print makes you legally and morally obligated to use in is month's Reader 
Service card. Keeping our advertisers happy means a bigger and better 73 for you. 






73 Amateur Radio Today • May. 1992 3 



Number 1 on your Feedback card 





^^B ^ ^ 


r 


Never sa y die 


j 


1 4/rt ■ >--» j^m /^^j«i Art 1 A/OMC'fl/'f 


Wayne hreen W2Nbu/l 


< 


^^^ 



Paying The Rent 

If you've been reading my editori- 
als . and if you have anything like the 
normal 70% retention for written m af- 
ter . . you are no! unaware that IVe 
boon casting about, looking lor help in 
coming up with some sort of plan which 
would help assure our survival as a 
hobby. 

As I've mentioned, for those of you 
with incipient Alzheimer's, none Of the 
original reasons for amateur radio's 
franchise to use our billions of dollars 
of bands hold much water these days. 
Knowing that commercial interests are 
getting more and more frantic for fre- 
quencies, knowing that several of 
the more frantic and better- heeled are 
busy taping the nonsense going on in 
our bands as a lever to force the FCC to 
rethink our allocations, . .I've been 
racking what little is left of my brain for 
some new rationale for us. 

Indeed. I've thrown down the 
gauntlet on this one (clunk), asking for 
your ideas as a contribution to my talk 
at Dayton, Hey, you are going to be at 
Dayton, right? Let's see If we can break 
30.000 attendance this year, 

Hmmrrip that gives me another idea, 
Let's set up a special room for the 
1 4.31 3 group to caucus. Once we have 
'em in there we can lock the doors and 
throw in a canister of nerve gas, I 'It see 
if King Hussein, who seems to sliil be 
good buddies with Saddam these 
days, can get some from Saddam lor 
us. Of course if you have a better idea 
for shutting these A-H f s up, please ad- 
vise. Seems to me that this is a clear 
case for justifiable euthanasia. 

A recent CD release of Gilbert & Sul- 
livan's "The Mikado" reminds me of 
Koko's song. He's the Lord High Exe- 
cutioner and he lists the people who 
should be on his list. Well, we hams are 
building a list loo, and it ain't so little. 
Koko's list is of "society offenders who 
might well be underground and who 
never would be missed. I've got 
them on my list. IVe got them on my 
fist" 

Weil, we've got our list of offenders 
too. The hams who tell dirty jokes and 
use foul language oyer the air. The 
jammers. The pontifical gas bags. The 
hems who make mean racist remarks 
The hams who put down youngster 
newcomers. And let's not forget any 
hams who broadcast endless self-pro- 



moting blather masquerading as pub- 
lic service^ 

Dam, I got carried away again, it's 
just that the vision of scourging the 
traitors to our hobby was a delicious 
thought I wanted to share. It's just a 
tired ok! man's dream. 

Take The Bull 

As I often say, ifs time to take the 
bull by the horns and run with it. So 
here's my plan for building a whole 
new raison d'etre for our hobby. And 
here's how you can help. 

What I need are testimonials from 
you telling me how amateur radio has 
positively affected your life* I need sto- 
ries of how getting interested in ama- 
teur radio as a kid (or later, even) 
changed your life. 



high-tech career paths. 

If amateur radio has had a positive 
effect on your life, grab any writing im- 
plement you can find. Don't worry 
about grammar and spelling {we can fix 
all that), iust get your story onto paper. 
Of course I prefer a disk and printout, 
but I'll take spiral bound notebook pa- 
per with the shreds still on and a stubby 
pencil. Don't let me down on this one. 
Please don't make me grovel and have 
to keep reminding you. 

Look, if amateur radio has helped 
you in life, you owe it something. Well, 
here's your chance to start paying off 
that debt. Give me ammunition in the 
form of testimonials and Til see that it 
gets used for the preservation of our 
hobby. 

Please address your stories to Testy 



Hey, you are going to be at Dayton, 
right? Let's see if we can break 
30,000 attendance this year. " 



I need success stories from you 
who've gone on as a result of amateur 
radio into high-tech careers Further, if 
you've done anything outstanding as a 
result of that, that's even better. 

I particularly need success stories 
from those of you who've started your 
own high-tech small businesses,.* 
Since small business is the real 
strength of America, Indeed, B7% of all 
new jobs have been in small business* 
es in recent years. We don't need more 
megacorporations for Wail Street to 
juggle around America needs tens of 
thousands of new small businesses. 
We need entrepreneurs And we need 
'em most in high-tech indus- 
tries just what we hams should be 
able to provide Just what we have 
been providing. . .so let's start making 
this part of the picture visible. 

If you' 1 1 write testimonials on how 
amateur radio oenefited you career- 
wise, I'M publish your stories in Radio 
Fun and in the NtAC Newsletter (Na- 
tional Industry Advisory Commit* 
tee) . . , which goes to the FCC com* 
nussioners and other key FCC decision 
makers. Let's swamp them with testi- 
monials on how much amateur radio is 
helping the American economy via 



Wayne Green, 73 Magazine, 70 Route 
202 North, Peterborough NH 03458. 

High-Tech Careers 

It's always fun to get letters from 
readers thanking me for pushing them 
to start businesses. One recent letter 
thanked me for suggesting that the 
home security market was a good fit for 
hams. He got started in his spare time 
and gradually built quite a business. It 
had revenues of $1 1 million last year 

This is still a rapidly expanding field, 
with sales overall growing by 10% per 
year and no end in sight. When you 
consider that crime costs Americans 
over $250 per person a year. . as 
compared to $12 in Japan. . and 
since there's little likelihood of the gov- 
ernment making any serious efforts to 
curb crime, it'll be a growing industry 
for a long time to come. 

Indeed, we have more crime in 
America than any other developed 
country in the world, and by a wide 
margin. We have a greater percentage 
ot our people in prison . . . over 1 ,5 mil- 
lion. Our main problem is in providing 
courts and building new prisons fast 
enough. 

The upshot of all this is that the pub- 



lic is more and more responsible for its 
own protection. Police can't respond to 
burglar alarms in homes with any 
speed when 98% of the alarms are 
false, so the alarms are more harm 
than help. Handguns kill several times 
as many kids as burglars. So there's a 
wonderful growing market for home se- 
curity. 

And security systems do work. They 
tend to discourage burglars and get 
them to take their business to less pro- 
tected homes. 

Several readers have written thank- 
ing me for suggesting in my editorials 
about getting into this business 

I've also had several thank-yous 
from readers who've made careers out 
of selling computer security systems. 
Two of them said they followed my 
sneaky scheme for convincing compa- 
nies about their computer security 
problems. They were amazed at how 
easy it was to listen from hundreds of 
feet away and get good copy. 

Of course if you're happy working for 
someone else and aren't interested in 
being your own boss and setting 
your own salary. . .and don't have lo 
worry about being jettisoned when 
sates drop . . , or finding yourself a no- 
lo nger- needed middle management 
person. . .well, never mind. 

[figure it's a lot easier to start a small 
business in your spare time before 
you're out of work and money than to 
wait until you're desperate. It's the 
"plan ahead' 1 concept. 

Once the business has grown to 
where it can support you; fine. Then 
you II make it grow more and start hir- 
ing help. . .which is where you'll find 
out about the real world, Heh, hen. 

The great proportion of small busi- 
nesses are not aimed at high growth, 
Most of 'em are started by people pre* 
ferring to be self-employed, They're 
not entrepreneurs, just small business 
people. Yet it's these small businesses 
which are the real strength of our Coun- 
try and provide 87% of all jobs. 

Entrepreneurs are a different lot. 
They're not interested in making mon- 
ey or in security, they're after growth 
and have a mission which transcends 
money. Oh, they know they have to 
make money, but that's a detail. Hams 
jealous of what I'm doing sometimes 
accuse me of being after the buck. 
That's what psychology calls "projec- 
tion." That's their problem, not mine. 
People with psychological problems 
tend to project them onto everyone 
else. 

Thai's not a bad concept to keep in 
mind. When you meet someone who is 
distrustful, watch out! Projection is 
very common. 

This recession has millions of Ameri- 
cans edgy, worrying about their jobs. 
Instead, it should be a time of opportu- 
nity, it's a lime to look for new bust* 
nesses that are needed. 

For instance, a chap consulted with 
me recently. He'd been laid off from a 
large photo finishing company's upper 
management. Okay, here's a business 
he knows, so why not take advantage 
of it? I suggested he start putting card- 

ConUnued on page 60 



4 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 







TM-441A/TM-541 

Compact FM Mobile 
transceivers 



I 



I 





■"■■■iiatanii 



TH:&1 | A 



CALL 



SHIR 



REV 



BQt 



Dfl/DT 



Here are yotWnew mobile com- 
panions — at your service whenever 
you're on the road! Their compact 
size makes installation a snap, and 
the remote control options allow you 
to customize your installation for 
that "professional" look! 

• Wide band receiver coverage. The 
TM-241A receives from 118-173.995 
MHz.Transmit range is 144-148 MHz. 
(Modifiable for MARS and CAP 
operation, permits required,) 

• TM-441A covers 438-449.995 MHz, 
and the TM-531A covers 
1240-1299.995 MHz. 

• CTCSS encode built-in, selectable 
from the front panel. 

• Selectable frequency steps for 
quick and easy QSY 

• TM-241 A provides 50 W. TM-441A 
35 W ( and TM-541A 10 W. Three 
power positions, 5, 10 T and full. The 
TM-541A has two power positions, 

1 and 10 watts. 

• 20 full-function memory channels 
store frequency, repeater offset 
sub-tone frequencies, and repeater 
reverse information. Repeater 
offset on 2m is automatically 
selected. There are four channels 
for ,4 odd spur operation. 

• Tone Alert System with Elapsed 
Time indicator 

• Auto-power off function, and time- 
out timer. 

Specifications guaranteed torAm&teist band use on/K 




RC-20 Remote Control Unit 

As supplied, one RC-20 will control 
one transceiver . Most often- used 
front panel functions are control- 
lable from the RC-20. The RC-20 
and IF-20 combine to allow control 

of up to four radios. 

. 



Selective calling and pager option. 

The DTI>2 option enables the Dual 
Tone Squelch System (DTSS), allow- 
ing selective calling and paging using 
standard DTMF tones, 
Digital recording system option. 
Used in conjunction with the tone 
alert system, the DRU-1 allows mes- 
sage storage of up to 32 seconds, 
Multiple scanning functions. Band 
and memory scan, with selectable 
scan stops and memory channel 

lock-out 

Large LCD display with four-step 

dimmer control. 

Automatic Lock Tuning (ALT) for 

theTM-541A. Compensates for drift. 



Supplied accessories. Mounting 
bracket, DC cable, fuses, MC-44DM 
multifunction DTMFmic. 

_ _ ■ ■ 



i Digital Recording Unit 
■ DTU-2 DTSS unit • IF-20 Interface 
unit, used with the RC-20, allows more 
than two transceivers to be remotely 
controlled • MA-700 2m/70cm dual 
band antenna with duplexer (mount 
not supplied}* MB-201 Extra mount- 
ing bracket • MC-44 Multi-function 
hand microphone * IWC-55 (8-pin) 
Mobile rnic with time-out timer 

• MC-60A, MC-80, MC-85 Base 
station rnics. ■ PG-2N Extra DC cable 

• PG-3B DC line noise filter * PG-4G 
Extra control cable • PG-4H Interface 
connecting cable • PG-4J Extension 
cable kit • PS-50/P3-430 DC power 
supplies * RC-10 Handset remote con- 
troller * RC-20 Remote control head 

• SP-41 Compact mobile speaker 

• SP-50B Mobile speaker • TSU-6 
Programmable CTCSS decoder 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS & TEST EQUIPMENT GROUP 

PO. BOX 22745. 2201 E Dommguez Street 

Long Beach. CA 9080V- 5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC 

PO BOX 1075, 959 Gana Court 

Misstssauga. Ontario. Canada L4T 4C2 



SJMfflKlMl 



. ..pacesetter tn Amateur Radio 



Letters 



Number 2 on your Feedback card 



Wiltard Shears W2IOS, Rocfclord (L 
Welt, Wayne, you did it. I've been a 
silent subscriber since 1962. I was 
W8HYE then, and promised not to live 
loo long in order 10 gel a lifetime sub- 
scription. I am a chief engineer a! WIFR 
m Flock ford, and am sod of tired of 
fixing the same stuff. I am a "fixer/' I 
can fix about anything you can plug in, I 
want to leach ihisand other skills to I he 
kids who have nowhere 1o go f and I 
would like to teach electronics and re- 
pair to the underpnvileged. 

I have had the luxury of being able to 
take lime 1o have fun. 1 still enjoy de- 
signing things, re-using equipment that 
was ready for (he scrap heap. I would 
like some ideas on where to go. what lo 
do. to get some of that pork thai is float- 
ing around to make some headway in 
getting a new generation of kids able to 
do something other than swap bad box- 
es when something breaks. Maybe you 
have an idea of how hard it is to get 
good maintenance techs; I know how 
hard it is. I want to start a tech school for 
kids, laid-off adults, and even dropouis 
who wake up, I want to make them even 
better than DeVry. I have had two De- 
Vry grads. and (hey are belter than a 
lot. but need a lot of (raining. If ham- 
ming would help. 1 would use it 

So. keep up ihe editorials Vou final- 
ly got me off my duff to write. Lets get it 
going. I want to live long enough to give 
my four kids a problem. Meanwhile. Til 
continue to OD on editorials. Most fun 
I've had in years. 

Ed Fox T Morgan Hill C A This last sum- 
mer, while vacationing at my in-laws', I 
found a notice about a class in the new 
no-code Tech license. It was laugh! by 
a remarkable man, Curtis Nakayama. 
His knowledge and stories, imparted in 
that wondrous soothing lilt from the 
Hawaiian islands was a marked con- 
trast to other experiences Td had with 
hams. 

Like any other new ham, I went shop- 
ping. I stopped at Ihe local store in San 
Jose. I'd been In there before, but now 
felt like I belonged. Imagine my sur- 
prise when I was ignored just like be- 
fore. The other surprise was the cost!! 

My other surprise was to not be con- 
tacted by anyone alter receiving the 
license. I think that any organization or 
group fighting for its survival would 
have leaped at any prospective new 
member. But the ARRL didn't make 
any effort to involve me. even after I 
purchased material from them aimed 
at learning the code and the tricks to 
getting a new station started 

I read your edrlorials with each new 
issue of the magazine. I liked your edi- 
torial emphasizing the human commu- 
nication part ot ham radio I disagree 
with most of your indictment ol educa- 
tion. I agree with your comments about 
needing to welcome newcomers. And. 
your recent column about the limited 
utility of the Amateur Rad*o Service is 
precisely accurate, 

Given the cost the way the ham field 
has changed since I was a kid. and the 
problems I note in ihe various ham jour- 
nals I have read. I fear I am going to be 
one of those who gets his firsi license 
and then quits. For me, I he major draw- 
ing card was a chance to communicate 
with kindred spirits around the world, as 
exempli had by Curtis Nakayama. 

As for education, there is a germ of 



From the Hamshack 

l ruth in whal you writ^ but your di- 
atribes miss some difficult-to-accepi 
truths about us as a country Back 
when you were in school, and even 
when I was in school, the proportion of 
the population which was like you, and 
me, was much greater than today. Pro- 
portionally, we funded education at a 
much higher rale than that now. We 
systematically excluded difficult-to-ed- 
ucale students, counting on the job 
martlet to absorb them. 

Today, most of America's students 
come from urban areas. Yet those ur- 
ban areas feature schools neglected 
by the rest of us. We forced public edu- 
cators lo unionize because we con- 
stantly devalued and denigrated their 
efforts. Il is a built-in contradiction lo 
insist that educators become highly ed- 
ucated, then insist that their opinions 
and reasonings are not worthy of con- 
sideration. We give our kids to these 
professionals and then expect the pro- 
fessionals to do the work or the family 
and the society. 

Make no mistake — there are some 
teachers who. as an administrator, I 
would love to remove tram education 
But, for every one of them, there are 
five to tO teachers 1 would love to re- 
ward by doubling or tripling their salary. 
Would you tolerate a teacher making 
$100,000? I doubl it. but we have no 
trouble with salespeople, lawyers, ac- 
countants, and stockbrokers making 
that amount. None ol these occupa- 
tions produce wealth, or the means to 
increase knowledge. But, to entice our 
best into education with sa fanes like 
that is anathema- Then we rant and 
rave about our educational system fail- 
ing us. Go figure it oul T I can't. 

Let me personalize the situation. A 
typical shack, as best I can figure from 
advertisements, must cost $3,000 to 
$5,000, How many hams would be will- 
ing to donate that amount to a school? 
Teachers and useless administrators 
are over-paid? Public schoofs are no 
longer seen as a part of us as a society, 
As your world of ham radio has 
changed, so has the make-up and de- 
mands of public schools. That $3 T 000 
to $5,000 we would not think of parting 
with reflects the cost of educating a 
student today. 

I encourage parents and communi- 
ties to take back their schools if they 
feel left out. But, take them back by 
re-owning them Put in your time there, 
even if your kids are long gone and 
even if the kids don't took like your kids 
did. Insist that buildings and facilities 
are ones you would like to work in, or 
that you would want your kids to work 
in. Insist that schools excel, but be 
there to acknowledge all the steps 
along the way to that excellence. 

If we want the achievement of Jap- 
anese and Korean schools, we must 
change our attitude toward schools. 
We must prize them We must believe 
that schools and school people are just 
tike we are and respond to approval. 

Yes, schools need to change. We 
cannot continue doing business as 
usual in many instances. Few among 
us eagerly seeks change. Even hams 
are known to cling to familiar ways 
which are no longer appropriate. Ham 
radio is a hobby, whereas education is 
a necessity. We cannol let pubtic edu- 
cation die or disintegrate ■, 

You seek ideas for the perpetuation 



of the Amateur Radio Service. Why not 
link hams with schools? Grant school- 
based shacks unique frequencies and 
priviliges to encourage hams to enter 
schools. Encourage the ARRL to reach 
out to schools. For example, here in 
California, funds are available for re- 
structuring schools. Why can't hams 
be a part of a changed delivery system 
for students? 

Most likely we will hear a response 
like. "" That's (he school's fob- I did my 
lime with my kids.*' At that point. Mr 
Green, I rest my case about Ihe demise 
ot the Amateur Radio Service and the 
continued deprivation of critical re- 
sources to our kids. 

As for my ham career, it's too soon lo 
tell Maybe my path will cross another 
Curtis Nakayama. Maybe a rig will fail 
off a passing truck. My interest is cer- 
tainly waning, From a different per- 
spective than yours. I ask. 'What's in 
ham radio for me?" 

I hope our interests converage 
enough to save both our interests, edu- 
cation for me and ham radio for you. 

R.L. Stevenson VY2RLS, P.E.L 
Canada Regarding your 'Never Say 
Die * column about old-timers in the 
September 1991 issue: It was for this 
particular reason that we founded a 
new club, We amateurs, new lo the 
fraternity, who have the basic qualifica- 
tions, had been stilled by the old fogies 
who wanted nothing more than to have 
control of the club and all (if any) re- 
sources. In fact, the members of the 
local "seniors" amateur club are now 
the executives of the local open club. 
The former club was initiated to "fur- 
ther amateurism among seniors," or in 
my opinion, to get as much money as 
possible from the government for a se- 
niors 1 project grant , They got ($20,000) 
to buy equipment. This sum was larger 
than anything any of the old farts had 
ever seen in their lives and they 
couldn't figure out how to spend it 
wisely, They went out and bought iwo 
(yes, twol) of just about everything (in 
case one breaks down). 

Now the Seniors' Club has two 
TS440S, two handhelds 1 two power 
supplies, and an auto patch (that, inch 
dentlly, seldom works, but they only 
got one of them). Anyway t my point is 
this: The seniors wanted to rest in the 
secure knowledge that the new up- 
starts would be subservient to them 
because, after all, who knows more 
about radios and equipment than a 
"senior"? Albeit to their dismay, a 
number of us wanted to go a little fur- 
ther and get our Advanced license but 
we couldn't because of the stifling at- 
mosphere. Now, a number of us are 
striving for that goat and anticipate a 
very near completion date. So. in re- 
sponse lo your column, you hit if rig hi 
on target! 

I find 73 to be a very informative and 
enlightening magazine. In fact, a bud- 
dy of mine and I buy alternating months 
and when we're finished reading we 
leave il in our club room tor the rest of 
the members to peruse 



Greg Smith N8PPZ, W, Carrol Hon OH 

t really love your editorials, II is nice to 
finally find someone who thinks like I 
do- I have been a no-code tech since 
August, and I am proud of my caH. I 
enjoy ham radio so much thai I keep 
irymg to make il better, but I don t think 
anyone is willing to help my crusade 

I am 21 years old and I go to Sinclair 
Community College full time, majoring 
in mass communications. I work part- 



time for WDTN TV-2 here \n town as a 
robottc camera systems opera tor /pro- 
grammer/crew trainer. I also produce 
my own television shows at the local 
public access cable station. I am very 
busy, but yet L manage to have time to 
participate in the number one hobby in 
the world. 

When I got some spare time I decid- 
ed to spearhead an effort lo start an 
amateur radio club at the college I nev- 
er imagined I would get so much nega- 
tive reaction trom the Student Govern- 
ment Association. They must approve 
all clubs. I had done some research 
and found out that at one time there 
had been a ham club there, but it dted 
over live years ago. There is still station 
equipment being stored on campus, 
and the tnband beam is still up on top 
of one of the buildings, in decent 
shape. So when 1 approached the SGA 
with my idea T they said. "It wouldn't 
appeal to enough students ." Thai's a 
bunch of crap. I personally know seven 
hams on campus, two of whom teach 
classes at the school and would be will- 
ing to sponsor the club In a school ihat 
has over 20,000 students enrolled. I 
calculate between 15% and 20% are 
ham s , scanner buffs , SWLs, or are in- 
terested in learning about ham radio 
That is more than the basketball learn, 
the chess club, or any other organisa- 
tion on campus. I believe the key lo 
making such a club successful *s in the 
way it is marketed and how visible ft is. 
What could be a better teaching aid for 
a student in social studies who wants lo 
learn about foreign countries? Of a 
communications major who wants lo 
develop skills? Or an electronics stu- 
dent who needs hands-on training? All 
of these areas have potential- The SGA 
is too narrow-minded to see this. 

Another area I think needs lo be im- 
proved in ham radio is the upgrading of 
no-coders. I have found that the local 
ham club doesn't seem receptive when 
asked if they would provide a code-only 
course for us to upgrade to Technician- 
plus status. They say they already offer 
Novice and General classes. Well, I 
don't need ihe Novice theory, and I 
don't know the code wel[ enough to 
take the General class. I am struggling 
through with the tapes and computer 
programs, so one way or another I 
WILL pass the five- word code lesl be- 
fore \ attempt to take the General cfass. 

Once I do manage to upgrade I will 
be in a unique posilion to teach ham 
radio: Public Access Television I can 
produce a training show for those stitl 
interested in the Novice ticket, the no- 
coders wishing to get code, and Ihe 
people who want lo gel a no-code li- 
cense, I guarantee it will be a lot more 
convenient than the occasional class- 
es the local club offers. II mighl jus I 
make our stalwart leaders gel off their 
duffs and do something constructive 
lor the hobby, once they see an in- 
crease of people testing, and a de- 
crease in attendance in their classes. 

As you can see. Wayne. I am doing 
something. I am trying to promote our 
hobby, and I am trying to infuse fresh 
blood into it I and others like me are 
the future ol not only ham radio, but 
Amehca in general. Are we going to sit 
back and accept tired old practices, 
just because that was the way things 
were done in the past, o* am we going 
to change things and move into the 
'90s? After what I have gone through, 
and continue to struggle against. I can 
see why r after alt the years, you have 
been doing whal you do, and why you 
continue to do it 



6 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1992 



QRX. . 



Number 3 on your Feedback card 



73 Has Moved 



7$ Amateur Radio Today has a new head* 
quarters. As of March 31 , 1992, our address 
will be: 73 Amateur Radio Today, 70 Route 
202 North, Peterborough NH 03458; tele- 
phone: (603) 924-0058. 

Bringing the Novice Class 
Under the VEC System 

Attorneys for the American Radio Relay 
League and the W5 YI-VEC have filed sepa- 
rate petitions for rulemaking with the Feder- 
al Communications Commission requesting 
that future Novice class amateur radio license 
examinations be administered under the cur* 
rent VEC System. 

The W5 YI-VEC and the American Radio Re- 
lay League VEC together account for approxi- 
mately 80% of all operator license examina- 
tions administered in the VEC System. The 
W5YI-VEC petition was filed on February 26 
and coordinated with the ARRL request filed 
the following day. 

The privatization of the amateur operator 
license examination function from Ine govern- 
ment to the VEC System has turned out to be a 
success story, of which the FCC and the ama- 
teur community can rightfully be proud. Ac- 
cording to FCC statistics, last year 103,251 
applicants were served at 8, 1 18 test sessions, 
an increase of 62% over the previous year. 

W5 YI-VEC pointed out that "Newcomers 
have flocked to the service via the Technician 



class license, despite the fact that the exami- 
nation setting is less formal than the Novice 
class setting, and despite the fact that they 
may be charged a modest fee to defray the 
cost of the examination.* 1 TNX WSYl Report , 
March 15 t 1992. 

Armed Forces Day 
Communication Celebration 

On Saturday, May 16. 1992, the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force will 
cosponsor the 43rd Annual Armed Forces 
Day Communication Celebration. The Ama- 
teur Radio Program, presented in celebration 
of Armed Forces Day per Department of De- 
fense directives, will feature the traditional 
military-to-amateur cross band communica- 
tion test and message receiving test. The tests 
give amateur radio operators and shortwave 
listeners an opportunity to demonstrate their 
individual technical skill and to receive recog- 
nition from the Secretary of Defense or the 
appropriate military radio station for their 
proven expertise. 

The proceeding will include operations in 
continuous wave (CW) T single sideband voice 
(SSB) and radioteletype (RTTY). Participating 
military radio stations will award commemora- 
tive acknowledgement (QSL) cards to ama- 
teur radio operators achieving a verified two- 
way radio contact. Special commemorative 
certificates will be awarded to anyone who 
receives and accurately copies the Armed 
Forces Day CW and/or RTTY message from 
the Secretary of Defense. All contacts must be 



acknowledged by QSL card or certificate to 
validate military interest in these operators. 

Milrtary*to*amateur crossband operations 
will take place from 16/1300Z (UTC) to 17/ 
0200Z (UTC) May 1992. Military stations will 
transmit on selected military frequencies and 
listen for amateur radio stations in the ama- 
teur bands indicated below. Frequencies as- 
signed below are the "Assigned Frequency. 17 
To derive the "Window Frequency/ 1 drop 1.5 
kHz from the "Assigned Frequency" for USB. 
For example: 4005.0 kHz (Assigned Frequen- 
cy) - 1.5 kH2 - 4003.5 kHz (Window/Dial 
Frequency). The military operator will an- 
nounce the specific amateur band frequency 
being monitored. Duration of each contact 
should be limited to three minutes. 

Ham Testing Fraud 

The FCC has used amateurs working in 
an undercover sting operation to investigate 
alleged VE testing fraud at ham radio schools 
in California. The FCC acted on complaints 
that applicants were able to buy Extra class 
licenses at some VE test sessions and in some 
amateur radio schools. 

The undercover hams, posing as appli- 
cants, used concealed tape recorders. Evi- 
dence of wrongdoing was found, according to 
the FCC. but no names have been released, 
pending completion of the investigation. TNX 
"The Birmingham/ 1 ' newsletter of the Birm- 
ingham (Alabama) Amateur Radio Club, 
February 1992, and the ARNS Bulletin, March 
1992. 



Station 


Military Frequency 


Emission 


Amateur Bands 


Station 


Military Frequency 


Emission 


Amateur Bande 


AAE 


4030.5 kHz 


LSB 


SO Meiers 


NMN 


7393.0 kHz 


HTTY/CW 


40 Meters 


Army HF/MARS Radio 


7356.5 kHz 


RTTYOV 


40 Meters 


Coast Guard Comm Area Master Station 








Facility 


13994.5 kHz 


USB 


20 Meters 


Cheasapeake, VA 








Fort Sam. Houston TX 


20941 5 kHz 


CW 


15 Meters 


NPG Naval Comm Station 


6970.0 kHz 


CW 


40 Meiers 




37992.5 kHz 


USB 


ID Meters 


Stockton. CA 


7301.5 kHz 


Lsa 


40 Meters 


AAH 


40215 kHz 


LSB 


30 Motors 




73650kHz 


CW 


40 Mete* 


ARMY HF/I4ARS Radio Faciirty 


63860 kHz 


RTTYJCW 


441 Maters 




102595kHz 


CW 


30 Mete* 


FortumWA 


1D1515kHz 


USftCW 


30 Mete* 




13927 5 kHz 


RTTY 


20 Mete* 




14438.5 kHz 


use 


20 Meters 




tt975 5kHi 


CW 


20 Mete* 




209750kHz 


use 


iSMeters 




14375 5 kHz 


US8 


20 Mete* 




20995 5 kHz 


RTTYJCW 


-5 Meters 




20625 kHz 


use 


15 Mete* 




2TO5.0lcHz 


usa 


IQMeters 




24805 kHz 


CW 


12 Meters 


AAA 


4033.5 kHz 


LSB 


80 Meters 




279500 kHz 


usa 


lOMete* 


ARMY HF MARS RadoFacjtty 


7309 5 kHz 


RTTYCW 


40 Meters 


NPLNav^Comm.Stf&ori 


738£5 kHz 


HI IY 


40 Meters 


Fort Bragg. NC 


144400kHz 


USB 


20 Meters 


SanOtego.CA 


14385 Q kHz 


USB 


30 Meters 




2QTQ5.5kHz 
27810,0 kHz 


USB 
USB 


ISMeters 
10 Mete* 


NZJ Marine Corps Air Sia 
El Toco, CA 


7375.0 kHz 
144600 kHz 


RTTY 
USB 


40 Meiers 
20 Meiers 


AfR 

99th Communications Group 


4025,0 kHz 
6995.5 kHz 
7315.0 kHz 


LSB 
CW 
LSB 


60 Meters 
40 Meters 

40 Meiers 


WAR HQ Army MARS Radio Slation 
Fort Delrick. MD 


401 as KHz 

6996 5 kHz 
13992 5 kHz 


LSB 
CW 

RTTY/CW 


30 Meters 
40 Meiers 

20 Mete* 


Andrews AFB 


13966.5 kHz 


RTTY 


20 Meiers 




14403.5 kHz 


USB 


20 Mete* 


Washington. DC 


13997.5 kHz 
14408.0 kHz 


CW 
USB 


20 Meters 
20 Meters 


a Stations copying AIR send entries to: 


20995.5 kHz 


usa 


15 Mete* 


NAM 


4005.0 kHz 


USB 


30 Meters 


Armed Forces Day Celebration 








N aval Computer Tei&corrmunicalion Area 


144000 kHz 


USB/RTTY/CW 


20 Meters 


B9CG/D0JW 








Master Slalion LANT 








Andrews AFB. DC 20331-6345 








toriOlXVA 








b Stations copying NAM. NAY NMH, NMN. NPG. NPL NZJ and NAV-8 send entries 10 




WAV HO 


73725 kHz 


smew 


40 Meters 


Armed Faroes Day Cetefanmoo 








Nav-rManne Corps MARS Rao* Station 


143895 kHz 


use 


20 Meters 


HQ HavyUartte Corps MARS 








CWtenharn. MO 








BLDG-13 NAVCOMM OCT Chetonhan 








NAV44QQ6 5kHz 


Vinous 


ao mam 




Washington, DC 20397-5161 
c Stftons copying AAE, AAJH, AAR, or WAR sand Mies to 






DiflHIAWiAfiCOflMARS REG EIGHT 

530Pa**A*. 

HmfcfeHl 


148200kHz 
109000kHz 


Venous 
Vinous 


20 Mete* 
20 Mete* 


Armed Forces Day Celebrated 

Department of the Army 

US Amy Information Systems Command 






MUM 


4015 kHz 


CW 


ou mem* 


ATTN:ASOP-HF 








Coast Guard Radio Station 


734*5 kHz 


LS8 


40 Meters 


Fort Huachuca, Al 856 13-5000 








Alexandria. VA 


144400kHz 


RTTY/CW 


20 Meters 


(This is a partial listing For a complete list of frequencies and modes, contact one of the 




20937.5 kHz 


use 


1 5 Meiers 


stations listed above.) 












Table t 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 7 



Number 4 on your Feedback card 



Poor Ham ' s Dynamic 
Component Analyzer 

Build your own circuit detective. 



by T. S. Rowinski KA1MDA 



As technology becomes more complex, 
the test equipment needed to trou- 
bleshoot problems becomes more complicat- 
ed as well. Twenty years ago, the only test 
gear required to repair virtually any con- 
sumer electronics product was a VOM, and 
an oscilloscope was a luxury many had to do 
without. Today, an oscilloscope is a must! 

One of the newer diagnostic trends in- 
volves the use of active component analyzers. 
Part oscilloscope, part curve tracer, and part 
signal injector, these units typically fall into 
two categories: self-contained portables with 
built-in CRT, and accessory units (usually 
part of a test jig) designed to be used with an 
outboard oscilloscope- Both types are priced 
beyond the reach of the average ham or elec- 
tronics hobbyist, with prices ranging from 
$400 to $1,000! 

After a bit of research, it became apparent 
that all these units functioned on the same 
principle. The analyzer supplies a current- 
limited AC sine wave to the device being 
tested, and displays the resulting current and 
voltage relationships on an X-Y display 
CRT. This creates a '* signature," a unique 
pattern which identifies the characteristics of 
the device being tested. The commercially 
available units also feature a myriad of bells 
and whistles, such as automatic signature 
comparison, various test frequencies, wave- 
form storage, etc. 

Since I already owned an oscilloscope, all I 
needed was an accessory-type analyzer. I sat 
down at the drawing board and came up with 
the Poor Ham's Component Analyzer. Al- 
though this unit lacks the bells and whistles of 
the big bucks analyzers, its basic effective- 
ness and operation are identical. The project 
itself is very easy to assemble, and requires 
only a handful of common junk box or ham- 
fest parts. All components also have a high 
"fudge factor' T and can be substituted for 
almost anything the 
builder has on hand. 
For those without a 
junk box, a parts list of 
Radio Shack equiva- 
lent part numbers is 
included. The best 
news, though, is that 
total cost of construc- 
tion, if all parts are 
purchased new, is less 
than $25! 




Figure L Theoretical circuit diagram. 

How it Works 

The basic circuit theory is quite simple (see 
Figure 1). A load is fed by an AC source 
through a current-limiting resistor. A voltage 
reading at point V2 indicates voltage across 
the load. According to Ohm's law (E = I/R) ? 
resistor Rx will develop a voltage drop pro- 
portional to the current passing through it. 
The higher the current drawn by the load, the 
higher the voltage drop across Rx. A voltage 
reading taken at point VI is directly propor- 
tional to the current drawn by the load. If the 
load is purely resistive, both VI and V2 
would rise and fall together as the source 
voltage increased and decreased through each 
cycle. If we replace the load with a non-linear 
device such as a diode, VI and V2 would no 
longer read in unison. During the first half- 
cycle the diode might be reverse biased, giv- 
ing a high voltage and low current reading. 
During some point of the next half cycle, the 
diode would become forward biased and con- 
duct, producing a high current and low 
voltage reading. If an X-Y oscilloscope were 
connected across points V 1 and V2, the scope 
would display the diode's switching signature 
and become a dynamic component analyzed 

The actual circuit is not much more compli- 
cated than that! (Refer to the schematic in 
Figure 2.) Transformer Tl converts the 120 
volt AC current to 12 volts across the full 
secondary winding, or 6 volts across the cen- 



TO SCOPE X 
(VERTICAL AUP) 

Jl 

" SHI.FL0 



Fl 



SI 



Tl 



4K 



1 1 



I 



TO SCOPE T 
(HORIZONTAL AMP1 
J2 



TIPQ 



R2 



cr-ij 



S2A 



: 



» S2B 



HI 

-wo- 



Figure 2. Schematic diagram for dynamic component tester. 



ter tap to either end. Resistors Rl (50 ohm, 1 
watt) and R2 (10k ohm, 1/4 watt) limit the 
maximum current which can be obtained 
from Tl on the low and high range respec- 
tively, and create the voltage drop which is 
fed to the scope vertical amplifier via Jl to 
display current. Note that the parts list shows 
two 100 ohm resistors for R 1 — this is because 
Radio Shack doesn't stock a 50 ohm, I watt 
resistor, so we make our own by connecting 
two 100 ohm resistors in parallel. If a 1 watt 
resistor between 47 and 56 ohms is available, 
it can be substituted for the resistors shown 
for Rl in the parts list. Switch S2 is a DPDT 
type and acts as a range selector. Section S2B 
switches between the 6.3 and 12.6 volt wind- 
ings of Tl, while section S2A connects the 
scope vertical input via Jl to the appropriate 
current-limiting resistor. The test leads are 
connected to J3, and the oscilloscope hori- 
zontal amplifier measures voltage at J2. 1 1 is 
a neon lamp assembly with built-in dropping 
resistor and acts as a power-on indicator. 
Switch SI serves as the main power switch, 
and fuse Fl provides over-current protection 
in the event of shorted wiring or transformer 
windings. 

Construction 

Before beginning construction of this pro- 
ject, please remember that this circuit is 
powered by 120 volt AC current- The 
voltages present on the primary side of Tl 
can be LETHAL! ALWAYS UNPLUG THE 
UNIT FROM THE ELECTRICAL OUT- 
LET BEFORE OPENING THE CASE! 
Likewise, never attempt to troubleshoot or 
modify the dynamic component analyzer 
while the circuit is live. When working on the 
unit t do not rely on the front panel power 
switch to remove power— always unplug the 
power cord! For additional safety, 1 recom- 
mend that the unit be assembled in a plastic 

case— do not use a 
metal chassis! If using 
a polarized power 
cord, connect the 
wider blade to one end 
of Tl's primary and 
the narrower blade to 
fuseFL 

Component location 
and layout is non- 
critical, and virtually 
any form of construc- 



gSHiELO 



-O SHIELD 



JJ 



TEST 

LEADS 



HJT1P 



8 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



I 




■•* * --\ % "», 



>_1^_ —..-.-.*.•. 



- -^ fc ^-^jrtiTrt fiirrtfclhriWJI 



Mode! P&88 



■ -;- J '\J i.. l<r :;ii''j^^; AtJ-j : l : ';.!li'. : 'l-. UK 



Packed Con toiler 



■ 



The PK-88 is becoming one of the most 
widely used packet controllers in the 
world. In some areas, it is outselling its 

closest competitor by 10 to 1 ! 

With the built-in 18k byte maildrop, 
you can use it as a "mini-BBS" in 
your area, and even automatically forward 
and reverse-forward traffic with your local 
PBBS. Or, just use it as a packet controller 
to help you catch that rare DX on your 
local DX packet cluster. 

The PK-88 can be used with a dumb 
terminal or any computer with an 
RS-232 port and a communication software 
program (such as PC-Pakratt-88). 




Cjll W r 



C!*^ 



nnan 



HEM^B 









*s 






L^Lm m BE 






ThePCB-88 includes all the 
features of the PK-88 (above), 
and is easily installed in your IBM PC 
or compatible computer. Even if your 
shack is short on space, you can still 
have the best packet setup available. 

In addition to the PK-88 's features, 
_ the PCB-88 also includes TAPR's 
state machine DCD circuit and 
modem disconnect header for added 
performance and convenience. 

To help make setup and operation 
a breeze, we've included AEA's 
powerful yet simple PC-Pakratt-88 
software and an AC-1 1 2 VDC adapt- 
er (keeps the PCB-88 on when the 
computer is off- U.S. models only). 

The PK-88 and PCB-88 packet 
controllers are the best money 
can buy, and that's no illusion! 



• < 





2 



P.O; Box C21 60/tynn wood, WA 93036 

Customer Service (206)775-7373 • Upgrade Hot fine (206)774-172: 

Catalog RequeSHihe (800)432-8873 •ConnpuServe User ID 76702, 10 T> ; 

iificftiiods Subject to ''Change Without Notice or Obligation . S >Co£yr!gM 4 99.1 by AEA> ,lnc: 'All: Rights Rese 

COME SEE US IN DAYTON AT 






•CAU.W 



tion can be employed, such as perf board, 
printed circuit board, or point-to point wir- 
ing. The prototype incorporated point-to- 
point wiring across a single, insulated solder- 
lug terminal strip. The unit can be housed in 
nearly any type of enclosure, as long as the 
material is non-conductive. The original unit 
was built into a 5-1/4" wide, 2-1/2" high, 5" 
deep plastic project case, which allowed for 
an open, uncluttered parts layout. If the se- 
lected enclosure has no provisions for air 
circulation, drill five or six 1/4" holes in an 
inconspicuous area to allow for the escape of 
heat generated by transformer Tl. Although 
T1 operates at a relatively cool temperature, 
heat build-up could become a problem if the 
analyzer were housed in a small, non-vented 
enclosure and operated for extended periods 
of time. Although Radio Shack appears to 
have discontinued the enclosure used in this 
article, they offer a number of other suitable 
enclosures. Figure 3 shows the front panel 
layout used for the original. I used BNC jacks 
for J1/J2/J3, although banana jacks or five- 
way binding posts could have been used just 
as easily. When wiring the jacks, pay close 
attention to the polarity — all three jacks 
should have their negative (shielded) lead 
hooked to the same point. Reversing the con- 
nections on one jack will cause the analyzer to 
display erroneous patterns or not work at all! 
For those who prefer to roll their own with 
whatever parts are on hand, only a few simple 
calculations are needed to design a functional 
unit. Transformer Tl is the heart of the pro- 
ject, and must have a center tap secondary 
with a terminal voltage between 9 and 20 
volts AC. Let's assume the builder has an 18 
volt transformer on hand. We need to calcu- 
late the ohmic value for Rl to limit current in 
the low range (Rl) to no more than 125 mA. 
Our hypothetical transformer develops 9 
volts across half the secondary, so we use 
Ohm's law (R = E/l) which gives us R = 
9/. 125 (remember to convert milliamps to 
amps), or 72 ohms. The next highest value 





















1 




1 

SCOPE 


HA MCE 
TEST 


POWER 

o 

ON 

1 

OFF 

1 












■ 











Figure 3. Front panel component layout. 

commercially available resistor is 100 ohms. 
Using I = E/R, we can calculate the actual 
current as I = 9/100, which produces 0.09 
amp, or 90 mA. To calculate power rating, 
we use the formula P = IE. Plugging in the 
numbers, P = 0.09x9, or 0.81 watts. Thus a 
100 ohm, 1 watt resistor is required for RL 
To calculate the value of R2, we use 18 volts, 
since the entire transformer winding is used 
in HIGH range, and we want to limit current 
to a maximum of 1 mA, Using R = E/L we 
get R = 18/0.001, or 18,000 ohms. The next 
highest commercially available value is 22k 
ohms. Calculating for actual current using I 
= E/R produces I = 18/22,000, or 0.00081 
amps (0.81 milliamps). Power rating (P = 
IE) calculates to P = 0.00081 X 18, or 0,0145 
watts. So, for R2 we need a 22k ohm, 1/4 
watt resistor. Using this example, it is possi- 
ble to quickly calculate the proper component 
values and for virtually any transformer! 

Initial Check Out 

Before plugging in the analyzer, a few 
safety checks must be made to insure proper 
wiring and operator safety. The values listed 
below are for units built with the parts speci- 
fied in the parts list. Set a VOM or DMM to 
the OHMS xl range, and connect it across the 
analyzer's power cord. The meter should 
measure infinite resistance with SI set to 
OFF, and about 160 ohms with SI in the ON 
position. Next, connect one lead of the meter 
to the negative (or shield) terminal of J3, and 
touch the other lead to the shield connection 



of Jl and J2. The meter should read ohms 
(dead short) , Connect the meter across II and 
read the resistance— it should be about 50 
ohms with S2 in the LOW position and 10k 
ohms with S2 in the HIGH setting. Switch the 
meter to the highest resistance range avail- 
able (RxlM on a VOM, or Rx20M on a 
DMM). Connect one meter lead to a blade on 
the power cord, switch SI to the ON position, 
and touch Jl, J2, and J3 with the other lead 
(be sure to check both the shield and the 
center contact). If a metal case was used, 
touch the case as well. The meter should read 
infinite resistance. Move the meter lead on 
the power cord to the other lug and repeat the 
above tests. Again, the meter should read 
infinite resistance. If the meter reads any 
resistance at all, stop and check the wiring. 
Do not proceed to the next step unless all the 
above tests check out correctly ! 

Plug the analyzer into a 1 20 volt outlet, and 
turn switch SI on. Indicator lamp II should 
glow. Switch the VOM or DMM to read AC 
volts, and hook the leads across J3. About 6,5 
volts should be present with S2 in the LOW 
position. Switching S2 to HIGH should cause 
the voltage to increase to approximately 13 
volts. Connect the meter across J2— the same 
readings should be observed. Connect the 
meter across Jl— it should read volts. Now 
short the terminals at J3, The meter should 
indicate around 6.5 volts with S2 in LOW and 
around 13 volts with S2 set to HIGH range. If 
alt readings were correct, the analyzer is 
working properly. 

Analyze Any Situation 

Now we're ready to put the component 
analyzer to work. Set up the oscilloscope for 
X-Y operation, and connect Jl to the scope's 
vertical input and J2 to the horizontal input, 
making sure the scope inputs are set to DC 
coupling, Do not use AC coupling, as the low 
frequency reactance of the scope's internal 
DC blocking capacitors may distort the wave 
form. Turn the analyzer on, set range switch 




a* 



i 1 1 r 



i 1 r — r 



J 1 — J. 



J l i l l 



b. 








1 1 1 1 


t 1 1 


1 


1 | 


ill. 


+ 


i 


l 


1 

1 



d. 



■^~ 


—r- 


— i — 




1 1 


l - 


"" r~ 


— r~ 


—r 




- 


















- 




















- 




















- 










+ 










— 


— 


















- 




_l_ 


_l_ 


i 


i 1 


i 


j 


i 


i 





i — ~i r 



1 r 



i — r 



/ 



-L L 1 1 I | L 



_l L 



g 



h. 



Figure 4. Typical component signatures: a + Open circuit; b. Short circuit; c Resistor; d. Capacitor/inductor; e. Good P-N semiconductor 
junction;/, Zener diode; g. Leaky semiconductor junction; h, Non-linear resistance, 

TO 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



MFJ 20 Meter CW Transceiver 

. . . throw this tiny CW rig in a corner of your briefcase and enjoy DXing and 
ragchewing wherever you go . . . you get a high performance super het receiver, 
crystal filter, RTT, AGC. vernier tuning, sidetone, speaker, 5 watt transmitter, semi- 
break-in, more ... ~ _ && 



MFJ-9020 



179 



95 



■ IS Meter and other bauds 
mailable soon 

•Free MFJ-9020 manual 

* Unconditional Guarantee 
for one full year 



Q* 



# 



TWf 




/7r7 



MFJ 20 METER CW TRANSCEIVER 



* 



Throw this tiny CW rig in a comer of your 

briefcase and enjoy DXing and ragchewing 
wherever you go. 

You'll turn lonely nights into exciting 
adventures as you contact fellow amateurs 
around the world. 

20 Meiers is open day and night so you can 
operate whenever you have a free moment 

Wkh 5 watts you'll have plenty of power to 
work the world even with a makeshift antenna. 

At home with a good dipole. vertical or 
beam, you ll be able to work almost anyone 
you bear — can you imagine earning DXCC 
with 5 wans? 

Big gun DX'ers: Try a new DX challenge 
for the price of a simple station accessory. 

If s good enough to oe your only rig — you 
get a high performance supcrhet receiver, razor 
sharp 8-Dole crystal filter, RIT, AGC, vernier 
tuning, sinewave sidetone, built-in speaker, 
headphone jack, adjustable semi- break- in. up to 
5 warts output plus much more. 

Covers lower 20 Meter CW band, 1 4. 000 
to 14.075 MHz. 6x6 '4x2 14 inches, Weighs 
1-3/4 lb + Uses 12-15 VDC Optional plug- in 
Curtis chip keyer, narrow audio filter, 
antenna tuner/ power pack and antenna. 

High Performance Super het Receiver 

You get a high performance supcrhet 
receiver with a selective double tuned front 
end and double-balance mixer. It's sensitive 
enough to copy weak DX signals down to the 
noise floor yet resist overload when a strong 
local comes on, 

What you hear is what you get — images 
and birdies are eliminated with this single 
conversion design and a high 10 MHz IF. 

A hall bearing reduction drive and linear fre- 
quency readout gives you smooth precise tuning, 

Han wan of audio gives you plenty of 
volume from headphones and built-in speaker. 

Razor Sharp Selectivity 
You'll slice through QRM and pull weak 
ones out of the mud with an 8-pole crystal 
filter that gives you razor sharp select iviiy with 
steep sided skirts. 

Automatic Gain Control (AGO 

Weak DX signals are just as loud as strong 
local ones because the MFJ-9020 graceful 
Automatic Gain Conirol (AGC) keeps your 



audio level constant. 

You get smooth break- in operation because 
MFTs exclusive AGC Recovery Gnuii™ gives 
you instantaneous transmit recovery. 

True Receiver Incremental Tuning (RID 

True Receiver Incremental Tuning <RJT) lets 
you dodge QRM and compensate for drift 
without moving your transmit frequency . 



MFJ Integrated CW Station 

Transceiver, tuner, vowerpack fastens together to 
form tiny 6x6 l Ax6*A inch integrated CW station. 



SAVE *30 



MFJ-9I20 





u 'iT <*0 & 



Save *30! S299 8 " 
buys complete 
MFJ CW Station. 
Includes MFJ-9020 
transceiver. 
MFJ -97 1 tuner, 
MFJ^l 12 power 
pack, MFJ- 1760 
antenna . . . order 



MFJ-9120. $329,80 if purchased separately". 



f 



JTFf 



Vn "'"I'.hn MW F4IPL 



Enough Power to Work the World 

With 5 watts you'll have plenty of power to 
work the world even with a makeshift antenna. 

You can use any antenna with an SWR up 
to 3:1. The MFJ-9020 is rugged enough to 
withstand momentary antenna opens or shorts 
without damage. 

If you're really into QRP you can reduce 
your power down to milliwatts. 

A pleasing sinewave sidetone lets you 
monitor your sending. 

You also get quiet adjustable semi-break-in 
and adjustable automatic transmit offset. 

You II get hours of battery operation — 
draws only 50 ma. receive, I amp transmit. 

Looks Great! 
Hie MFJ-9020 is housed in an attractive 
matte-black aluminum enclosure with a deluxe 
brushcd-aluminum front panel and matched 
knob set. Machine screws and pressed- in PEM 



nuts are used — not sheet 
metal screws. 

Has power-on LED, 
transmit LED ami SO 239 
coax connector for antenna- 
Designed by Rick 
LittleTfeld, KlBQT 

The MFJ-9020 was 
designed bv Rick 
| Ltttlefield. "KlBQT. He's 

known worldwide for his 
reliable high-performance 

transceiver designs and 

numerous papers. 

KlBQT has given careful attention to board 
layout, heats inking, mechanical rigidity, voltage 
regulation and component selection to ensure 
stable operation ana long-term reliability. 
It meets or exceeds all FCC requirements. 

Comes fully assembled, tested and 
guaranteed to work 

Your factory built MFJ-9020 is ready to 
work DX right out of the box. If s not a kit 
of parts you have to put together and hope 
you can get to work. 

Free MFJ-9020 Manual 
Manual includes operating instructions, 
setting up your station, DX techniques, antenna 
suggestions, trouble shooting guide, theory of 
operation, alignment procedures, parts 
placement, schematic, pans list and more. 
For free MFJ-9020 manual write or call MFJ, 

Plug-in Keyer and Narrow Filter 

MFJ-412 Curtis chip iambic keyer, $39.95. 

MFJ-726 namow audio filter, S29.95. Has 
In/Out switch. 

Each plugs into MFJ-9020. Controls on rear 
panel. No soldering or modifications needed, 

No Matter What™ Guarantee 

You gel MFJ's famous one year No Matter 
What™ unconditional guarantee. That means 
wc will repair or replace your MFJ-9020 (at 
our option) no matter what for a full year. 

Continuing Service 
MFJ Customer Service Technicians will 
help you keep your MFJ-9020 performing 
(lawlessly — no matter how long you own it, 
Jusi L"ill our toll-free help line 
800-647-TECH(8324) — an MFJ exclusive. 

Made in USA 

The MFJ'9020 is made in the USA, Help 
our fellow Americans by keeping our money 
here - buy Made in USA. 

Call Your Favorite Dealer Today 
Enjoy DXing and ragchewing wherever you 
go. Call your favorite dealer today and ^et 
your MFJ-9020. Don't leave home without it* 

Other Bands Available Soon 
MFJ CW Transceivers for 15 Meters and 
other bands available soon. Watch for them. 



MFJ Portable Operating Accessories 



MFJ Portable Antenna Tuner MFJ Portable Power Pack 







• 



fTfJ 




MFJ 971 Has Cross-Needle SWR/Wattmeter, 
$yOS5 covets 1.8-30 MHz. balun for 

*™ balanced lines, 200 wutts PEP, Tunes 
coax, balanced lines, random wire. Wattmeter 
has two ranees. Tinv 6x6^x2U inches matches 
MFJ-9020. Fastens io MFJ-9020 and/or 
MFJ-4112 Power Pack to form single unit. 



MFM112 Portable Battery AC Power Pack 
for MFJ-9020 or other low power 
transceiver. Provides 12 VDC from 

eight D cells (not included) or from 1 10 VAC. 

6x6'4x2 '4 inches matches MFJ-9020. Fastens to 

MFJ-9020 anoVor MFJ 971 Portable Antenna 

Tuner to form single unit 

CIRCLE 86 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



MFJ Portable Antenna 

* 29" Lightweight, easy to carry, easy to put 
up Perfect for portable operation with MFJ-9020. 

Nearest Deater/Ortkrs: 80(^647-1800 

Technical Hdp: 80<MS47 TECH (8324) 

• 1 year unconditional guarantee • 30 day money back 
guarantee (less s/h) on orders fnom MFJ • Free catalog 

MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC, 

Box 494, Miss. State. MS 34762 
(601 J 323-5tf0: TELEX: 53 4590 
FAX: (601) 3234551: Add S^K 

MFJ . + . making quality affordable 

© 1992 MFJ Fmeipriseai. Inc. 




S2 to HIGH, and then switch the scope on. A 
horizontal line should appear on the CRT. 
Now short the test leads at J3, and the trace 
should become a vertical line (if these dis- 
plays are reversed, swap the connection to the 
scope) . Never turn the analyzer off with the 
scope on* as this will stop all trace sweep on 
the oscilloscope, and the resulting stationary 
spot could burn the CRT if left in place too 
Longl Adjust the scope's input attenuators to 
obtain a nearly full-scale deflection on the 
CRT in both axes (about 5 volts per division). 
The actual attenuator setting or scope calibra- 
tion is unimportant, since we are not interest- 
ed in measuring absolute voltage or current 
values. The trace shape is the important 
thing, 

The dynamic component analyzer can be 
used to test discrete components in or out of 
circuit, and can also be used to isolate defec- 
tive stages in complicated circuits. To test 
components out of circuit, clip the compo- 
nent across the test leads at J3, and observe 
the waveform displayed on the oscilloscope. 
Small signal diodes, transistors, and IC chips 
are tested in LOW range, while power tran- 
sistors and rectifiers should be tested using 
the HIGH range. Resistors, capacitors, and 
inductors can be tested on either range— sim- 
ply select the range which gives the most 
detailed display, When testing capacitors, 
pay attention to the voltage rating, especially 
on electrolyticsl 

Testing components in circuit, or attempt- 
ing to isolate a defective stage, requires a 
slightly different procedure. First and most 
important, do not attempt to use the analyzer 
on powered circuits! Always make sure the 



Dynamic Component 
Analyzer Specif icatrons 
Maximum open-drcuit test voltage; 

Low Range: ^3 VAC peak (6,5 V RMS) 

High Range: 18.8 VAC peak (13 V RMS) 
Maximum short-circuit current; 

Low Range : 1 23 mA rms 

High Range; 1 .2 mA rms 
Test Frequency: 60 Hz 
Input voltage: 120 volts AC 
Maximum input power consumption: 

Low Range : 1 .8 watts 

High Range: 1 watt 




1 lO VAC 



Front PaneF - Rear Vbatv 



Casv BoH urn - Incidc View 



Figure 5. Wiring diagram. 





Parts List for Active Component Tester 


Qty. 


Description 


Symbol RS^ Price 


1 


1 2,6V CT transformer 


T1 273-1 365$4.29 


1 


6-foot AC power cord 


PI 278-1255$ 1.1 9 


1 


5-point lug strip 


274-G884/$1 .29 


1 


SPST toggle switch 


Sl275-624$2.29 


1 


DPDT toggle switch 


S2275-626$2.59 


t 


neon lamp assembly 


11 272-705 2/$1 .79 


1 


fuse holder 


270-7392/$.99 


1 


120V, 1/4Afuse 


F1 270-12713/179 


2 


100 ohm, 1W resistor 


R1* 271 -1522/3.29 


1 


10 k ohm, 1/2W resistor 


R2271-0312/$.25 


3 


BNC chassis mount jack 


J 1 -3278-1 05$t.39/ea. 


1 


plastic case 


270-250$3.99 


Total cost of project: $23.92 




* Connect the two 100 ohm, 1 watt resistors in parallel to 


create the 50 ohm resistor needed for R1 r 



device under test is disconnected from its 
power source, or severe damage could occur 
to the analyzer, scope, or unit under test. This 
warning holds true for the commercial units 
as well. Dynamic component analyzers are 
not meant to be used on live circuits! 

To properly test a component in circuit, a 
known-good "reference* 1 circuit is required, 
since multiple current paths will tend to dis- 
tort the analyzer signature. The test leads are 
alternately placed across identical points on 
the good and bad boards. Although the result- 
ing pattern may not look anything like it 
should, the scope traces should be identical 
between the two boards. When identical test 
points produce different signatures, the tech- 
nician has found the defective stage, and fur- 
ther comparison on a part-by-part basis 
should quickly weed out the defect. Although 
most readers don't have a spare TS-440S or 
IC-735 lying around, this is still a viable 
troubleshooting technique for audio equip- 
ment. Most faults with stereo components 
typically involve only one channel. Thus, the 
functional channel can be used as the refer- 
ence for the bad channel! 

Component Signatures 

Most components under test will produce 
one of eight main types of traces, or signa- 
tures. An open circuit (Figure 4a) produces a 
horizontal line, while a dead short will pro- 
duce a vertical trace (Figure 
4b). A resistor will produce a 
diagonal line (Figure 4c) t the 
angle of which will depend on 
the value of the resistor. Very 
low resistances will produce an 
almost vertical trace, while 
very high resistances will tilt 
the trace just slightly off the 
horizontal baseline. Capacitors 
and inductors cause the trace to 
appear as an oval (Figure 4d). 
The shape and angle will vary 
from a very narrow ellipse to a 
large, broad circle, depending 
on the actual value of the com- 
ponent under test. A good P-N 
semiconductor junction should 
appear as a right angle (Figure 
4e)— a vertical line meeting a 



horizontal line at a very sharp, well defined 
90 degree angle. A skewed vertical line, or a 
rounded, poorly defined intersection between 
the two lines (Figure 4g) indicates a leaky 
semiconductor junction. If the pattern ap- 
pears reversed, or upside-down, don't wor- 
ry , as it is a function of test lead polarity. A 
zener diode should produce a stair-step type 
pattern (Figure 4f). Again, it doesn't matter if 
the pattern appears upside-down from the 
example— the overall shape and definition of 
the right angles are the important things. Fi- 
nally, a non-linear resistance will produce the 
trace shown in Figure 4h. Non-linear induc- 
tance and capacitance will produce a similar 
trace, except that it will appear as an ellipse 
instead of a line, Three terminal devices such 
as transistors are tested as three discreet P-N 
junctions. Hooking the test leads across the 
emitter and base, the base and collector, and 
finally the emitter and collector, should pro- 
duce traces for a good P-N junction, a good 
P-N junction, and an open circuit, respective- 
ly. Although it may seem a bit complicated, 
the basic patterns are easily learned within a 
few hours. The quickest way to learn is to 
grab a handful of junk-box parts and observe 
the signatures each produces! 

The prototype unit described in this article 
has been in use for a little over six months 
now, and has proven itself extremely useful, 
especially in testing semiconductors. I previ- 
ously tested transistors with an industrial di- 
gital multimeter with a built-in diode test 
function. I was literally shocked to discover 
how many of my surplus junk box power 
transistors were actually bad! Although the 
DMM indicated all the devices were good, 
the component analyzer showed over 40% of 
the devices suffered from excessive emitter- 
collector leakage, poor junction perform- 
ance, and gross non-linearities! And check- 
ing junctions with the analyzer is twice as fast 
as using the DMM, since there is no need to 
reverse the test leads for front-to-back com- 
parisons! The tester has also weeded out a 
number of capacitors which were either leaky 
or exhibited excessive amounts of series re- 
sistance. All in all, the unit has easily paid for 
itself many times over- The prototype was so 
successful in the shack that I'm building a 
second unit for the work QTH! 



12 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1992 




. - ". '.-',.■ 




[ . 11 . 



■ ■ - -■■ 



■ ' ■ ' 



■ '' "ih" 



2 1 Reasons To Buy 






' ' 



in 




Wp 




1, 

6, 

7. 

a. 

13. 



IS. 
16. 
17, 
18. 
19. 

21* 

All 



iE"10Mzto 

Hi-Speed ASfC (Application Speeife Integrated Circuit) ;St^e-O^Tfe-Art: 
258 Time§ Faster than other hand held douhtors. 
10 Digit LCD; Readability §vw> iri -Bright Sunlight 
6 Functions - Frequency, Period, Ratio, Time Interna]/ Average and 
RF Sighaf Strength Bargraph % 16 Segments Zero & Full Scale Adjust. 
Excellent for locating Hidden Transmitters. 
Four e^rerrieiy Fast Gate Times Gi, 1 1 s 10 sec. 
Dual High Impedance Amplifiers; 
Maximized Sensitivity 

Hoy Switch > Locks ;in measurements FAST- 
± 1FPM Accuracy 

Direct Count - 1 Hz resolution to 22QMhte 
Sensitivity <1mv 1pMHz -200MHz, <5mv * 2GHz. 
Single Shof Time Inteival 100ns, .1ns averaged 
Push-button Input, Gate & Function selection, 
Extruded Aluminum Enclosure, 
NiCad & Charger Included; 
Low Battery Indicator, 
1 Year Parts & Labor Warranty 
30 day Money Back Guarantee. 
OPTOELECTRONICS backs this with ourl 8 Years of 
Dependability & Service, 

this and more for the Low Price - $375. 



. 



^^^i^^^™^^^^^^ 



I t 1 T ■ 1 ■ T T U « !■ » I I ■»»»■!■■■■■ 



i r ■ ■ ' ■ ■ w'i ■ » ■ n'.i i 



— , — • — - .,- — ■ — 




OPTIONS: 




For A Limited Time Only 

Model 3000 f BacklighljBeeper, Carry 
Case & TA-100s Whip Antenna 

All -this for only $44A 



TCXO 30 ±.2ppmTCXG 

BLB30 

Back light & two step audtbte signal level indicator ,.$ 75, 
CC30 Carry Case $ 15. 

TA1 MS Telescoping Whip Antenna $ 12 



Factory Direct Order Line 

1 -800-327-591 2 

(305)771-2050 < FAX(305) • 2052 5821 NE 14th Ave. - Ft, Lauderdale, FL 33334 

5% Siiip/Shancfting (Max. $10) U.S. & Canada. 15% outside continental US, Visa & Master Card Accepted. 

CIRCLE 28 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



YOU CANT LOSE! 



Number 5 on your Feedback card 



Log Periodic Dipole 
Array for 2 Meters 

Wideband performance in a smail package. 



by Dave Koslow N2KLK 



1 wanted an antenna for back- 
packing that would be very 
portable, very small, have high 
gain, a good f/b ratio, and cover the 
whole 2m band. Not a small wish 
list! 

Consulting my trusty ARRL An- 
tenna Book, I experimented with 
quads (too bulky and fragile) > ver- 
ticals/ground planes {low gain and 
not directional), and yagis (too big 
physically, and small bandwidth). 
Then I found what seemed to be my 
dream antenna— the Log Periodic 
Dipole Array. Never seen one? 
Just look at the roofs in your neigh- 
borhood — many TV antennas are 
LPDAs! 

The LPDA 

In these antennas the elements 
are all driven, and each half is fed 
ISO degrees out of phase with the 
other. The feedpoint is at the front 
of the antenna. All the characteris- 
tics, such as SWR* gain, f/b ratio, 
and pattern, are fairly constant 
over the entire operating band- 
width, This means you don't have 
to optimize the antenna for a small 
segment of the 2 meter band, You 
can work any mode anywhere in 
the 4 M Hz range and expect consis- 
tent performance. At VHF and 
above, the feeders can double as 
the boom. This allows for simple, 
solid construction. While all ele- 
ments are driven in this system, not 
all are active at any particular fre- 
quency. As the operating frequen- 
cy changes, so does the area of the 
antenna that is resonant* The re- 
maining elements act like reflec- 
tors and directors. {The ARRL An- 
tenna Book, 15th Edition, pp. 10-1 
to 10-7.) 

With the help of a spreadsheet, 
scientific calculator, and lots of 
tea, 1 worked through the equations 
to optimize a design. Believe me, 
this is one antenna project where 
math had better be your friend! 

I arrived at a 5 -element design 




Photo A. Inside Jul! view, horizontal polarization. 




Photo B. Detail of the boom and element, horizontal polarization. 




Photo C. Detail of the hoom t element assembly and feedpoint 
attachment. 



that gave 9 dB gain, about 1 5 dB f/b 
ratio, and all on a 2-foot boom! My 
finished antenna collapses to a bun- 
dle about 25" x 1.5" and weighs a 
little over a pound . Not too shabby , 
huh? Because of its small size, this 
is also an excellent * 'stealth" an- 
tenna for condos that don't like 
hams. It looks just like a tiny TV 
antenna. Its portability and high 
gain also make it perfect for emer- 
gency communications. 

I built a prototype from plumb- 
ing pipe and old bits of TV antenna 
to prove out the design. Later, I 
made an interesting discovery — the 
prototyped performance was a 
close match for the final version 
that I machined! 

My final antenna basically con- 
sists of two parallel feeders of 1/2 " 
aluminum tube and five sets of ele- 
ments of 1/4" aluminum rod. You 
should be able to find this in any 
good hardware store. The feeders 
are held together with a fixed gap 
by nylon hardware and washers. 
(Sets of nylon hardware, sufficient 
for two antennas, are available for 
$4 from: Dave Koslow N2KLK, 
3315 Hamilton Rd., Fairlawn NJ 
07410.) 

Clearly, here is a case where 
measurement, not material, is im- 
portant. 1 have included data on 
various element and feeder diame- 
ters so you can build one out of 
what you have at hand. 

Construction 

You will need some basic metal 
working tools and skills. Later in 
this article I have included some 
alternative suggestions for con- 
struction using simpler techniques. 

Cut the two boom sections to 
27". You will need a drilling jig 
and drill press to make accurate 
holes. 1 made up a block of wood, 
slightly longer than the boom sec- 
tion, with a "V" notch about 3/8" 
deep down the long axis. Lay the 
boom section in the groove and 



14 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 



o 

yj 
Q_ 

< 

in 



o 

DC 
LU 



LU 

Q 
■ 

< 
< 



o 

CL 

I- 

co 
< 

o 

o 
o 



LU 



< 

LU 
< 



o 

LU 
CL 

CO 



LU 



O 
DC 



LU 



£ 



UJ 

a 
i 

< 

< 



o 

I— 
< 

a 
o 
o 



LU 



< 

LU 
< 



B& W * BENCHER • BUTTERNUT • CUSHCRAFT • DIAMOND • HUSTLER • HYGAIN • ICOM * KANTRONICS 




SALES 



SERVICE 




ORDERS 
IN-STATE 
SERVICE 
FAX SERVICE 



1-800-TRU-HAMM 
1-313-771-4711 
1-313-771-4712 
1-313-771-6546 



23040 Schoenherr, Warren, Ml 48089 

OPEN MON-FR1 10-6, SAT 10-4, SUN CLOSED 



WANTED: QUALITY USED GEAR, CASH OR TRADE 



KENWOOD 



jgBjBL 

TH-22SA 

TH-27A 

TH-47A 

TH-415 

TH-77A 

MOBILE VHF/UHF 
MODEL 



DESCRIPTIO N 

2M SW SCANNG DEL 
2M 2-5W MFCHO £DME 
70CM 2-5W MICRO 
TOCMZWSCANNdDEL 
JM/TOCMDELDUALB 



DESCRIPTION 



TM-241A 


2M J5W PROG MIC 


TM-331A 


220MKZ 2SW PROG MtC 


TM-441A 


44DMHZ 25W PROG MlC 


TM-741A 


SMtfOCM^TfllBANDER 


TM-751A 


2M25WALL-MQDE 


T5-711A 


?M?5WAM.MaaFeAse 


TS-790A 


ZM/70CM SATELUTE 



HF EQUIPMENT 
MODEL 

TS-MOS 

TS-690S 

T5450S 

T5-4505/AT 

T&450S 

TS450/AT 

TS^950S 

TS-9S0SO 



DESCRIPTION 

HFCQMPGENCOV 
HF/BM COWP Q EN COV 
HF DELUXE O0MP 

hfdelCdmptumr 
HF12VDELDDS 
WFlZVDELTLlNfl 
HF BASIC VERSION 
HF THE OX MACHINE" 



LIST 

399.95 

419.95 

429.95 

419.95 

H0.H 



LIST 

459.95 
169.95 
4/9,95 
S49.95 
E9S.95 
1059.95 



LIST 
949.95 

1549.95 
1349.95 
1549.95 
1699.95 
1*99.96 
3399.95 
1339.95 



PUBS 

CALL 
CALL 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 



TERMS: 

Prices Do Not Include Shipping. 

Price and Availability Subject to 

Change Without Notice 

Most Orders Shipped The Same Day 

COD's Welcome ($4.00 + shipping) 



3 B 



-vSi 






ICOM 



CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
Call 
CALL 



OURS 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 



WE STOCK A PULL LINE DF ACCESSORIES 

FOR THE KENWOOD LINES, CALL FOR OUR DISCOUNTED PRICF3' 

l-BOO-TflLNHAMM 




ADVANCED ELECTRONIC APPLICATIONS 



MODEL 

ISQLOOP 

ISOPOLE1H 

MM-3 

pcb^b 

PK-232MBX 

Pk-os 



description list 

14-30MHiHF ANTENNA 348.00 

2M BASE VERTICAL 50,00 

TRAlNEfi/KEYER 1S9.00 

IBMCOWP PLU&INBflD 179.0D 

ALL-MODE flTTY. CW 379.00 

packE r Tn€ 300/1 zoo sand 1 aa .do 



UUHS 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 



NT'S 
MODEL 

IC-02AT 
ifraGAT 
IC-SSAT 
IC2SRA 

*C2*AT 
tC-3SAT 
JC-4SAT 
FC4SRA 
IC^GAT 
IC-W2A 

MOBILE VHF/UHF 
MODEL 

IC-229A 
IC-229H 
IC-3220A 

IG-322QH 
I0-J4K? 

HF EQUIPMENT 

MODEL 

1C-72S 

lC-726 

IC-73& 

1C-751A 

lC-7fifi 

i&rai 



OESCRIPTtON 

aMSWlOMEMDTMF 
EM 7W 15M£M DTMF 
3M2-5W DEL MICRO 
aWSCANNCfl MT 
2M/70CM DEL MICflO 
220M 2-5W MICRO 
7DCM 2-5W MICRO 
7QCM/5CANNER HT 
■/0CM7W15MEMOTMF 
2M/70CM DUAL MICRO 

DESCRIFTt ON 

2MFM. 25W2DMEM 
2M FM, 45W 2DMbM 

2M/70CM 25W 40MEM 
2M/70CM45W40MEM 
2M.70CM 45W DEL. 

DESCRIPTION 

• IF COMPACT GFN CQV 

HF/6MCOMPGENOOV 

HP DELUXE COMPACT 

HF iZV BASE TXCB 

HFDELUXETNR.PS 

HF DX'ERS DELIGHT 



409.00 
429.00 
459.00 
599.00 
499.95 
449.00 
149.00 
599.00 
449 0D 
629.00 

LIST 
449.04 

479,00 

B59.00 

69900 

TEA 

LBT 

939 00 
1299.00 
1149.00 
1699.00 
3149.00 
& Lis ■::■:■ 



OURS! 

Call 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

PLWS1 

CAI.I 

CALI 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

OUfiSi 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

CALL 
CALL 



WE STOCK A FULL LINE QF ACCESSORIES 

FOR THE ICOM UNES, CALL FOR OUR DISCOUNTED PRICES' 

1 -BOO-TFILI-HAMM 

cushcraft 



NT'S 

WODEL 

FT-411E 

FT*T1 

FT-470 

FT-2* 

FT-7B 

MOBILE VHF.IUHF 
MODEL 

FT-290RII 

FT-E&DRII 

FT-73BR 

FT-5S00 

FT-6200 

FT-E4S0H 

rT-79QRll 

HF EQUIPMENT 

MUDEL 

FT-747QX 

FT757GXII 

FT-76A3X 

FT-990 

FT'tOOOB 

FT^IOOOD 

FT-S90AT 



YAESU 



DfeSCfUPTtON LIST 

2M2-SWS0MEM.CTCSS 405 flO 

7DCM 2-5W S0MEM 405.00 

2M/70CM 2-5W 50MEM 4&1 .00 

2M-&WVWTH/PTM5 PAGING 349 DO 

440MHz-5WWITH/DTMS PACING 359.00 



DESCRIPTICH LIST 

?M ?S W Ml -MODE B10.0O 

6M10W ALL-MODE 7&2.GO 

2MiT0CM 22&n t SAT 1922.00 

3M^70CM DUAL BAND 749.00 

TOCMlf 1 2. DUAL BAND B99.00 

SMMW,LCD t CTCS5 <l9-«3 

7DCM2SW ALL-MODE 68100 



DESORJPT1QN L£T 

HFLQTWQT MOBILE *W9.O0 

HfCOMPQENCOV 1089 00 

HP MXQffTQC TUWR 2£99jO0 

HFiaVDELTUNflt 2399 M 

HF BA^lC VERSION 3399.00 

HP QSL CATCHER!? 4399.00 

HF DEL MOBILE DOS 1 529.00 



WE STOCK A FULL LINE OF ACCESSORIES 
FOR THE VAESU LINES. CALL FOR OUR DtSCOU NTED 
PRIGE5I 1 ■ &DO - TRU - H AMM 



TEN^TEC 



&. 



ASTRON CORP. 



MODEL 

KM-35M 

RM-50M 

RS-IE'A 

R5-13W 

RS-12S 

RS-20A 

R$'?0M 

PS-20S 

RS-35A 

RS-35M 

RS-50A 

RS-5QM 

R3 i'A 

VS-20M 

VS-35M 

VS-S0M 



DESCRIPTION 

POWStJP 19 ' PACK 25. 35AC 
POWSUP 19" RACK 35. MAG 
POWSU" t2V. 9AC0NT 12SLTR 
12V9C12SWMFTERS 
POWSUP 12V 7.5 IOC SPKR 
POWSU P 12\/, 1 $ CON 20 SuR 
POWSUP *3V ^6C 30S W MET 
POWSUP T2V r6. 20C SPKR 
POWSUP 12V. 2S CON 3S SUR 
POWSUP t2V. 25C.35S W MTR 
POWSUP i?V, J5CON50SUR 
POWSUP 12V. 35C 50S W MET 
POWSUP 1 ?V 5A COM 7A SUR 
T6A, 20C MTR VOUCUR CON 
POWSUP 1 2V25C 35S MET VA 
POWSUP 1 2V35C 50S MET VA 



LIST 

310.95 
354.95 

75.95 
•■•■•-- 
1 12.95 
1^1 .95 
144.95 
138.95 
t9?,95 
204.95 
2fl5.B5 
31495 

5B.95 
170 95 
330.9& 
33095 



OURS 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 



MODEL 

A38 

A3WS 

A4S 

APS 

AH-10 

AR-3/70 

ARX-220B 

ARK-2B 

Am 

AV5 
R5 

R7 



CORPORATION 

DESCRIPTION 

ANT HF 1 OrtSraOM 3 EL STAI 

ANT HF I2j i 17M. 3 EL. BDO. STAI 

ANT HF THIBANDER 1O/15J20 

ANT HF SO- 10 WARC VERTICAL 

TEH METER HINQO 

2MT70CM BASE VERTICAL 

220 MHz VERTICAL 

VKF 2M VERTICAL 

HF 20/1 BM0M VERTICAL 

ANT HFa074O/2OJf 5/10 VERTICAL 

H F 20/ 1 m 5/1 2/1 VERTICAL 

7. 10. 14. lft. 21. 24. 28M VERTICAL 



HF EQUIPMENT— AMEiRlCAN MADE 



MOPEL 
OMNJIV 
PARACON 



D ESCRIP TION 

HF9BANDTXCVH 
HFGENCOVTKCVH 



LBT 

2245.00 
22*5.00 



DAIWA 



MODEL 
CN101 

CN103 

CN41DM 

CN460M 

CN465 

CN520 

V-!.'.-..- 

hsbbopa 

NS663SM 
NS6G3BN 



DESCWPTION 
METER 1. S- ISO MHz 15/1 5K 
1 40-525 M-Hz SWRIPWR METER 
3 5- 1 60 MHZ SWR/PWR MTR 
1 40-450 MH? SWR/PWR :MTfl 
METER 1 40-450 MHrl5/75W 
MfETEH 1 ,B-«0 MMt 200/JkW 
METER 1.8-lKJ MHz 30/3KW 
MEEER I.e-tSOMHzanW 
SWR METER BASE UNIT 
METER 150-525 MHzSOOW 



LIST 

100.00 

10295 

£5.00 

B5.00 

eri.so 

BB.00 
159 50 
19500 
177.97 

187 65 



OURS 
CALL 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 



MODEL 

NR-mH 

Nft.770fi 

5K-100 

SX-1000 

SX-200 

SX 4;"JI? 

3X-G00 

X-2O0A 

X-300 

X-500A(N) 

X-5O0HNA 

X-50A 

Jf-700 



DIAMOND ANTENNA 

DESCRJPTIOH LIST 

2M/7QCM 3,'g, DS WQB ANT &4.&S 

2M//0CM 3V5.5 OB MOB 54.96 

TOOM 1.B-B0M3O/3O0VaKW 165.00 

1000 M 18-1 BOM 3O0 275.00 

200 M 1 .*-?0OM 5/2O/20OW 125.00 

400 M 1 -KO-52&M &£0/?QQW 1 45.DO 

600M1.S-«Jf1*O-S25 2MW 215.00 

2M/70CMe3HSyBOB 1SO.B5 

2M/70CM E.5/9 DB 169.95 

2M/70 8.3/11. 7 DB 209.95 

HD REPEATER VER X-SO0 254.95 

2M/70CM 5.8^4.5/7^06 1 19.95 

2 M/7DCM 24' H 9.3/1306 409,95 



KANTRONICS 



See Michigan Radio 

At the Dayton Hamvention 

in the Silver Arena 

24,25,26,1992 
Booth #'s 328, 329, 330, and 331 



April 



MDDEL 

2-117 

2-217 

2-23 
2-317 

2^417 

2T?0 

S/TOG 

3-112 

3-2t1 

3-22 

3-312 

4^110 

4^10 

4-32 

RPC'Erttf 



DEScniPTioN 

1i4MHj AMPIOWIN 1 TOWOUT 
144MH? AMP2WIN 170WOUT 
l«MHz AMP2W1N 30WOUT 
144MHf AMP 3QW1H 1 7QWOUT 
i^iMNz AMP 45WIN 1 7QWOUT 
DUAL 3-30W 2M/5-20W 440 
PREA3-30W 2Mffi-20W440 
2MMHZ10WIN120W0UT 

220MHz 2WIN110WOUT 
22DM'HZ AMP2WJN 20WOUT 
220MH; 30WIN 120WOU1 
■m^MmzAMP 10WIN 10QWQUT 
440MHZ AMP 30WIN lOOWOUT 
440MMi AMP 3WIN 20WOUT 
DUALBAND AMP 5W1N25WOLJT 




R/R 






sr 





Room 5 




STEWART 



* - 




1 ft«R £C°<1 



oufls 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 



OURS 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 



OURS 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 



OURS 

CALL 
CALL 



OURS 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL 

CALL. 



MODEL 


DESCRIPTION 


UST 


DURS 


DATA ENGINEER 


TNC SOFTWARE 


49.95 


CAL ! 


KAM 


CW/RTTY/PACKET/FAX TwC 


319.95 


CALL 


KPC-2 


300/1 200 BAUD PACKET TNC 


1B9.95 


CALL 


If PC .2400 


300/1 2MW24O0 TNC 


27900 


CALL 


KPC-I 

# 


DUAL PORT VHF PACKET TNC 

fconoeo 


279.00 


CALL 



LIST 


OURS 


310 00 


CALL 


3T9 00 


CALL 


1J3.D0 


CALL 


279.00 


CALL 


279.00 


CALL 


23000 


CALL 


289.00 


CALL 


319.00 


CALL 


31900 


CALL 


129.00 


CALL 


279.00 


CALL 


388-00 


CALL 


3^1.00 


CALL 


170.00 


CALL 


269.00 


CALL 



m 



O 
O 

a 

* 

E 

DO 

m 



31 
> 

m 



3D 

-n 
O 

o 

o 

m 



a> 



m 



m 

o 



> 

m 
a> 

* 
m 



o 

O 
a 

m 



> 
m 







o 

m 

"D 
CO 

m 



m 
o 

> 

m 

CO 



BS W • BENCHER • BUTTERNUT • CUSHCRAFT • DIAMOND • HUSTLER • HYGAIN • ICOM • KANTRONICS • 



CIRCLE 162 ON READER SERVFCE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 15 



Reference 
1 



Boom Spacing „J 
(See Table 1) _!_ 




Figure 1. Construction details of the LPDA antenna. Note that the feedpoint is located { A " in 
front of the shortest element pair. 

tioiL Cut off the excess boom material, about 
1/4" behind the longest element, and 1/4 " in 
front of the feedpoint. Assemble the two 
boom sections together with nylon hardware 
and sufficient washers to provide the speci- 
fied gap. The two halves must be insulated 
from each other, as they are the active parts of 
the feeder. 

Cut each element about 1-1/4" longer than 
the finished size to allow for threading and 
tuning. Using a i/4-20 die, cut about 1" of 
threads on one end of each rod element (see 
Figure 2), Put a nut on each element, spin- 
ning it down to the bottom of your threaded 
section, and tighten it in place with a wrench. 
In a LPDA, the feedpoint is at the front of the 
antenna, so the smallest element goes here. 
Each element half is screwed in to the boom, 
alternating top-left to bottom-right for the 




Figure 2. Cut each element 1-1/4" longer 
than shown in Table 1. Then cut al" length of 
screw threads on one end of each element 
using a 1/4-20 tap and die set 

scribe a line down its length with a pencil, 
using the block surface as a guide, This will 
be your drilling line. 

Now rotate the tube so that the line is per- 
pendicular to the block. Drill a small hole at 
each end of the boom section and 
secure the boom to the block with a 
small screw. Now lay out the hole 
spacing, starting with the first hole 
about 1-1/4" from an end. The 
measurements for hole spacing and 
element length are given in metric 
terms for greater accuracy. Mark 
each point with a center punch or 
hammer and nail to prevent drill 
skip. Drill and tap each hole for a 
1/4-20 thread. These are for the 
elements to screw into. Drill a 
small hole, about 1/2" forward of 
the smallest element. This will be 
the feedpoint. Remove the boom 
from the jig, rotate 90 degrees, 
then secure it again with small 
holes and screws at the ends. Now 
drill three 1/4 " clearance holes, at 
about 3% 13" and 23" from the 
longest element end* These are for 
securing the two boom halves. Re- 
peat the process for the second sec- 

16 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 



Specifications 




Frequency range: 144-148 MHz 




Gain:9dB 




F/B ratio: 1 5 dB 




Half-power beamwidth: 25 degrees 




SWR:< 1.5:1 




Boom length: 25" 




Longest element: 41 +" (total) 




Packed size: 25" x1.5" 




Finished Element Halves (2 of each) 


Element Spacing 


Element 1 52.44 cm (20.65") 


Reference 


Element 2 48.50 cm (19,10*) 


16J8cm(6.6V') 


Element 3 44.86 cm (17.66") 


15.52 cm (6.1 1") 


| Element 4 41.50 cm (16.34") 


14.36 Cm (5.65 ") 


Elements 38.33 cm (15.11") 


13.28 cm (5.23") 


Boom Spacing (Center-to-Center) 




0.500" boom & 0,250* element 


0,614" spacing 


0.500" boom & 0.376" element 


0.652* spacing 


0.625" boom & 0.250" element 


0767" spacing 


0.625" boom & 0,375" element 


0.815" spacing 



first element, top-right-to-bottom-left for the 
second, and so on (see the photos and Figure 
1). This is to give a 180 degree phase shift to 
each pair. Attach a nut, finger-tight, to the 
element segment protruding from the boom. 
Measure each element length from the boom 
center and File or grind off the excess. Do the 
same with the threaded element past the nut. 
To attach the feedline, solder the conductor 
and shield to small brass washers and secure 
to the boom with brass hardware. 

Alternatives 

There are many ways to construct a LPDA, 
My two antennas were radically different in 
construction style and both work fine. In my 
prototype, the elements were 3/8" aluminum 
rolled tubes from an old TV antenna, held in 
to a copper tube boom with sheet metal 
screws. The boom insulators were PVC pipe 
welded together. 

If you can't find aluminum tubing, 1/2" 
copper tubing works just fine. Because of the 
difference in diameter (it is really 0.625" 
o . d . } i the antenna requires a different spacing 
of the boom halves. See Table 1 for the speci- 
fications. If you don*t have access to metal 
shop tools, try contacting a local high school 
industrial arts shop. Surely a little fast talking 
(and maybe a ham radio demo) can get a few 
pieces threaded and drilled. You could also 
try using plain aluminum rod with speed nuts 
instead of threads. This will make portability 
a bit tough, though. Another possibility is 
threaded steel rod for the elements. Use your 
imagination— the dimensions and spacings 
are all that is critical. 

Mounting is somewhat an individual thing, 
but there are some guidelines to follow. Be- 
cause the whole antenna is active, it doesn't 
Like metal masts too close. This is especially 
true with vertical polarization. You should 
have a nonconductive mast at least 10" be- 
yond the longest element tip before a metal 
mast. I use a 3' PVC pipe on a small metal 
mast for backpacking DX. The antenna rests 
in a slot at the top and is held in place by a 
slotted PVC end cap. One end has a slot for 
vertical polarization; the other end 
is horizontal. This works pretty 
well for temporary setups. I 
haven't worked much on a perma- 
nent installation. Whatever you 
come up with, make sure you don't 
short the two boom halves togeth- 
er. If performance (or SWR) is 
poor, check that the elements are in 
proper order, and alternating left- 
to-right and top-to-bottom. It is 
very easy to make a mistake, so 
check carefully. This has **got" 
me several times in the hills. 

I have had great success with this 
antenna, on repeaters and SSB, ev- 
erywhere from mountaintops to my 
back yard. Try it I think it will be 
the best portable antenna you've 
ever had. 



Table L Log periodic dipole array specifications. 



Contact Dave Koslow N2KLK at 
3315 Hamilton Rd. f Fairlawn NJ 
07410. 



Feedback 



In our continuing effort to present the best 
in amateur radio features and columns, we 
recognize the need to go directly to the 
source — you, the reader. Articles and 
columns are assigned feedback numbers, 
which appear on each article/column and 
are also listed here. These numbers corre- 
spond to those on the feedback card oppo- 
site this page. On the card, please check 
the box which honestly represents your 
opinion of each article or column. 

Do we really read the feedback cards? 
You bet! The results are tabulated each 
month, and the editors take a good, hard 
look at what you do and don't like. To show 
our appreciation, we draw one feedback 
card each month and award the lucky win- 
ner a free one-year subscription (or exten- 
sion) to 73. 

To save on postage, why not fill out the 
Product Report card and the Feedback 
card and put them in an envelope? Toss in 
a damning or praising letter to the editor 
while you're at it. You can also enter your 
QSL in our QSL of the Month contest. All 
for the low, low price of 29 cents! 

Feedback# Title 

1 Never Say Die 

2 Letters 

3 QRX 

4 Poor Ham's Dynamic Component 
Analyzer 

5 Log Periodic Dipole Array for 2 
Meters 

6 QRP Sidetone Companion 

7 The Copperback Beetle 

8 Review: The MFJ-247 Antenna 
Analyzer 

9 Battery Watchdog 

10 Control Your Station by Computer 

11 Review: LOGic Jr. and LOGIC II 

13 Review: Daiwa PS-304 Power Supply 

14 Review: Yaesu FT-26 

15 Homing In 

16 ATV 

17 Hams with Class 

18 QRP 

19 Circuits 

20 Dealer Directory 

21 New Products 

22 AskKaboom 

23 Special Events 

24 Above and Beyond 

25 Hamsats 

26 RTTYLoop 

27 73 International 

28 Barter 'n' Buy 

29 Random Output 

30 Propagation 

31 DXpodition Lessons from Peter I and 
Bouvet Islands 



EVERY ISSUE 
of 73 

on microfiche! 

The entire run of 73 from October, 1 960 
through last year is available. 

You can have access to the treasures of 
73 without several hundred pounds of 
bulky back issues. Our 24x f iche have 98 
pages each and will fit in a card file on 
your desk. 

We offer a battery operated hand held 
viewer for $75, and a desk model for 
$220, Libraries have these readers. 

The collection of over 600 microfiche, is 
available as an entire set. tno partial sets) 
for $285 plus $5 for shipping (USAL 
Annual updates available for $1 0. 

Your full satisfaction is guaranteed or 
your money back, Visa/MC accepted, 

BUCKMASTER 
PUBLISHING 

"Whitehall" 

Route 3. Box 56 

Mineral. Virginia 231 17 

703-894-5777 
800-282-5628 



r 
i 
i 
i 



Budget QSLs 

$39/1000 



I 
I 
l 



I plus $3.75 Shipping in U.S. I 

■ • RAISED PRINTED * ■ 

I BEAUTIFUL, GLOSSY INK I 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Thought you couldn't afford really good 
QSLs? These high quality RAISED 
PRINTED cards can be in your hands for 
only 4c each! Your choice of 4 colors of 67 
lb. bristol stock; Gray. Yellow, Blue, Ivory. 
We print in blue ink in the format shown. If 
you don't want the state outline, we can 
remove it and make the callsign larger to 
balance the card. NO EXTRA CHARGE 
for ARRL logo, or extra wording if we have 
the room. Order with confidence, these 
are the best value in Ham Radio today! 
Your satisfaction is guaranteed. Sand 
your check or call us if you have Master- 
Card or Visa. 
Need a custom card? Call (318) 443-7261 . 




iiwua«icun]i 

-■m - mm* V 



rr:z .::.;.:.. ■ 



£*C2t Q>**p 



DENNIS 

WA5QMM 

NETWORK 

QSL CARDS 



CIRCLE 168 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



P.O. Box 13200, Dept. 73 

Alexandria, LA 71 31 5-3200 

(318)443-7261 or FAX your order to: 

(318) 445-9940 



I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
i 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



CIRCLE 44 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



VERSATILITY! MEASURE POWER FROM 
2mW to lOkW WITHIN 5% OF READING. 




A handful of Bird's 
unique 7-level plug-in 
elements and a 441GA 
series THRULINE* watt- 
meter, lets you cover wide 
power and frequency ranges 
anywhere — engineering lab, 
production floor, service bench 
or in the field. 

Inside Bird's 4410A directional 
wattmeter is a patented, self- 



balancing bridge detect- 
ing scheme that permits 
fast> accurate readings 
from 2mW to 10kW over 
frequencies from 200 kHz 



who else but 

ffiiYH 



(or as low as 50 kHz 
with a special ele- 
ment) to 2.3 GHz. 
^F^ The secret is in the new 
4410 series elements pro- 
viding seven power ranges 
instead of one, with ±5% read- 
ing accuracy. Simply select the 
range you want with a front *panel 
rotary switch. 

Available in 4 versions: battery port- 
able, AC and battery 
portable, rechargeable 
portable, or AC and battery 
rack mount. Carrying case 
optional. 



30303 Aurora Rd„ Ctewtand OH 44139 USA • (216) 248*1200 *TLX: 706898 Bird Bee UD • FAX: (216) 24fr5426 
WESTERN REGION OFFICE: Ojai CA ■ Phone: (605) 648-7255 

€ Copyngfrt 1 99 1 &*f O E iecrrof*e Corp 



CIRCLE 176 DM READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 992 17 



Number 6 on your Feedback card 



QRP Sidetone Companion 

And part-time code practice oscillator. 



by Charles D. Rakes KI5AZ 



If you're a QRP emhusiasi who enjoys 
building and operating small QRP trans- 
mitters, and you're doing so without the ben- 
efit of a built-in sidetone generator, take a 
look at our QRP Sidetone Companion and 
part-time code practice oscillator. This inex- 
pensive t easy-to-build project can add a 
pleasant sidetone to almost any QRP trans- 
mitter, and serve double duty as a code prac- 
tice oscillator for a soon-to-be ham. 

Five transistors, a few capacitors and resis- 
tors, and an IC occupy a small PC board 
measuring 7/8" x 2-1/4", All of this along 
with an on/off switch, two phono jacks, a 
speaker, and a 9- volt battery, share space 
in a small plastic cabinet from Radio Shack. 
If you don't have a junk box to scrounge 
from, you can end up with ten dollars or 
less in the project by prudent component 
shopping. 

The Inner Workings 

To see how the circuit goes, lake a look at 
the schematic diagram in Figure 1 . The cir- 
cuit is designed to operate with most any QRP 
transmitter that uses a positive keying voltage 
(most do). Two phono jacks are wired in 
parallel with the center conductors connect- 
ing to the base of Ql through a 680k resistor. 
C5 eats any stray RF that might come in on 
the key leads. The positive keying voltage 
turns Ql on. The emitter of Ql is direct 
coupled to the base of Q2, turning it on also. 




Figure 3. Parts placement. 



Q3 is direct coupled to the collector of Q2, 
and when Q2 is on, Q3*s base is clamped to 
near ground level, turning it off. With no 
current flow through R4, Q5 remains off. 

By closing the key, the positive voltage at 
the base of Ql disappears, turning Ql and Q2 
off; this allows Q3 and Q5 to turn on, bring- 
ing up the plus supply voltage to pin #4 of the 
567 PLL IC. The 567, connected in an audio 
oscillator circuit, produces an audible tone sig- 
nal that drives Q4. Q4's collector supplies au- 
dio to the speaker through a current-limiting 
resistor, R8, R9 sets the sidetone's frequency. 

Three transistors are used in the front end 
to isolate the sidetone's circuitry from load- 
ing and falsely keying the QRP transmitter, 
For even greater isolation, Rl can be in- 



e 



iOk 



P! 



TOTi 
KEY IN 



HT 



T 



Ci 
I 



<R3 

; 4Tk 



Jl 



@ 



ffl 



Hi 
eeofc 

I **¥> 



Ql 






TOKf* <£ 



Two** 



10* 



05 



B5 

tOl 





r^ 



SI 



"1* 

i 



•±-ai 

9V 



T0«C 

C4 
005 



TO* 



JTT 

j Li 



-** 






41-44 Z«3*Q4 
5 ZH390« 



ICI 

5*7 






m 



l! 



: :. 



a io 

4TQ4 



Wl 



04 




ffi 



Figure I. Schematic diagram of the Sidetone Companion. 



creased to 1 megohm. This will only be nec- 
essary if the sidetone circuit is used with a 
super-sensitive keying circuit— which isn't 
likely, but with Mr. Murphy lurking around 
every corner, anything is possible. 

The part-time code practice oscillator is 
activated by inserting PI into either J I or J2 t 
and a key in the remaining jack. If you like to 
fiddle with the sidetone T s frequency, drill a 
1 M * hole in the cabinet directly over R9, and 
adjust away. 

Building the Sidetone Companion 

The easy way is to use a PC board and 
follow the component placement drawing in 
Figure 2. As you position each part on the 
board, double-check its value and electrical 
location against the circuit diagram in Figure 
I . In any case, the circuit is non-critical, and 
can be built breadboard style and housed in 
anything you like. 

The circuit board is cut to slide into the 
groove in the side of the cabinet. The tele- 
phone headset (speaker) is located at one end 
of the cabinet, hot-glued in place. The power 
switch, the two phono jacks, and the plug are 
located along one edge of the cabinet. The 
battery fills the other end, Using the compan- 
ion, plug the key into one of the jacks and run 
a jumper from the other jack to the *key" 
input of the transmitter. Flip SI on, and hear 
what you are sending. Good QRPing! B 

Charles D. Rakes KI5AZ, P.O. Box 445 r 
BenwnviileAR 72712. 




Figure 2, PC hoard foil pattern. 

18 73 Amateur Radio Today • May , 1992 







Parte list 




B1 


9- volt transistor battery 


R8 


2.2k 1MW resistor 


CI .2,3 


0,1 |iF SQ^oltdisc ceramic capacitor 


R9 


50k mint trim pot {vert} 


C4 


005 pF 100-vott mylar capacitor 


RIO 


470-ohms 1 /4W resistor 


C5 


680 pF 100-vott disc ceramic 


S1 


Mini 3PST toggle switch 


Q 1,2,3.4 


2N3904 NPN transistor 


Spk-1 


Headset removed from okf telephone or a mini 


06 


2N3906 PNP transistor 




8- or 16-ohm speaker 


!C-1 


567 PUL IC 


NPPCi 


Cabinet, wire, battery snap, hot glue, etc. 


J1.2 


Phono jacks 


A printed circuit board and all of the parts tor it are available tor 


PI 


Phono plug 


18.95 ptus$1 .00 shipping from: KRYSTAL KITS. P.O. Box 445. 


Rt 


680* V4W resistor 


eentonville AR 72712. Tel. (501) 273-5340, You will need to 


R2 


47k 1/4W resistor 


furnish the cabinet, switch, jacks, plug, speaker, oahery, and 


B3.4.5.0.? 


10k 1/4W resistor 


any pari not 


on the PC board. 




For the best buys in town call: 
21 2-925-7000 

Los Precios Mas Bajos en N ueva York 

WE SHIP WORLDWIDE! 




KITTY SAYS: WE ARE NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

Saturday & Sunday 10 to 5 P.M. 

Monday-Friday 9 to 6:00 PM 

Come to Barry's for the best buys in town 



Lewis W2BIE, Kitty WA2BAP, Jan KB2RV 

Join us for the latest 
En amateur/commercial radio 





ONV Safety 
belts-in stock 



O 
ICOM 

IC-R71 A, 751 A, 781 , 229B, R-70O0, IC-765, 
fC-726, 322QH, 735, IC-901, IC725, 
IC-241QA/2500A, R-1 n R-72, R 100 



KENWOOD 



FT-767GX, FT-890, FT-747GX, FT-990, 
FRG-8800, FT-736R, FMO0OD, FT-415/815 
FT-5200, FT-24G0, FT-470 



SL>:-50 

CSS 




ANTENNAS 

AS. AES, Cushcraft. Hy-Gairt, 
Hustfer, KLM> METZ, Urban, 
MODUBL0X. T0NNA, Butternut, 

Multi-Band 



YAESU 

FT-23R/26/76 

FT411E8T 1-911 

FTH-20Qe/7008 



TS450S/AT, R-5000, TS-B50S, TM 241A/ 
441 A, TR-751A, Kenwood Service Repair, 
TH225A, TM-631 A, TS14GS, TS690S P RZ-1, 
TS-790A, TS950SD, TH-77A, TH27/47A, 
TM-941 A, TM-741 A r TM-732A. 




AMPLIFIERS 
STOCKED: 

RF Concepts 

Mirage 
TE Systems 



MARINE RADIOS 

ICOM M7, M11 + M5G, M700TV, MflOD 

AVIATION PORTABLE ICOM A-21 

KJNGKX-9§ 




Biidwig ANT, Products 

FLUKE 77, 13, 85, 87 Multimeters 




JCOM 

IC2/3/4SAT 

IC02AT/2SRA 

IC2/4GAT/24AT 

IC-A21/UT6 



Landmobile HT'a 

ICOM: U16, H16. VI 00, U400 

MAXON, MOTOROLA, 

YAESU: FTH 2006/7008 

UN I DEN, REGENCY. KING r 

MARINE COM, M7 P M5&, M70O 

AVIATION ICOM: A21 H.T.. TAD 



Simplex Autopatch SDI-50 Will Patch FM 
Transceiver To Your TeJephone. Great For 
Telephone Calls From mobile To Base Simple 
To use, SD I -50 




w ■ ■-. yC-.< tnWF*t»#*S 





i 1 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ i ■ ■■»■■ 

Pnriya Patch El 

* * £ c • 

Connect Systems (CSI) 

PRIVA TE PATCH V r Duplex 8200, 
CS800 

TUNERS STOCKED: 
NYE MBV-A 3 Kilowatt Tuner 



IC-W2A 



IC-H16/U16 



GEOCHRON 
World Time Indicators 



MOTOROLA flADHJS 

COMMERCIAL RADIOS 



TH«77A 



FM70 




MOTOROLA t l" ini l v ^Srg 





VoCom/Mirage/AMnco 

VoCom/Nlirage/TE SYSTEMS 

Amplifiers & 5/8XHT Gain computer interfaces 

Antennas IN STOCK Stocked: MFJ-127DB, 

MFJ-1274, MFJ-1224, AEA 

GAG ELECTRONICS ART1 , PK-88, MFJ-1278T, PK-232 MBX MOTOROLA AUTHORIZED DEALER 

Air Dfsk T SWU Morse Coach W/FAX, DBS! PRODUCTS KACHINA COMMUNICATIONS DEALER 



DAIWA 



COMMERCIAL 

&HAM 

REPEATERS 

STOCKED. 

WRITE FOR 

QUOTES 



Kantronics 
KAM, KPC II, 
KPC IV, Data Engine, 
DVR2.2 



Covercrafl/Coaxsefll Slocked 



SHORTWAVE RECEIVERS 
STOCKED 




Panasonic 

Shortwave Radios/Marine 



AOR-AR900, 1000, 2500, 2600, 
3000— wide range scanners 



JRC 
NRD-525, 

JST135, 

NRD-535D 



AUTHORIZED 



Wide selection of SW & Amateur 
Publications 




'& 



Telephone scramblers 

for cellular and regular 

phones. S293. M each 



Phillips DC-777 

FM,MW ; LW,SW 

Cassette Car Stereo 



Alpha Delta 
Products 
Stocked 



AEA jsopoles 
(144, 220, 440 
MHz), Isoloop. 




EIMAC 
3-500Z 
572B, 6JS6C 
12BY7A& 
61466 

BIRD 
attmeters & 
Elements 

In Stock 




DEALER 

DIGITAL FREQUENCY COUNTERS 

OPTOELECTRONICS model 1 300 HtA, 0-1300MHz 

£300, 2210 H, 0-2200 MHz, 260DH, UTC-3000, 2610 

Long-range Wireless 
Telephone for export m stock 



BENCHER PADDLES, 

BALUNS, LOW PASS FILTERS 

IN STOCK 



Radios for Business, 
Gov't, 2-wav, etc. 
Stocked & serviced, 
call for great prices! 



COMET ANTENNAS 
STOCKED 



Media Mentors— 

Amateur Radio Course 



HEIL 

EQUIPMENT 
IN STOCK 

DRAKE 




MIRAGE AMPLIFIERS 

ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

Belden Wire & Cable, Int'l Wire 

OPTO KEYERS STOCKED 




Hy-Gain Towers 
will be shipped 
direct to you 
FREE of 
shipping cost. 



New TEN-TEC 
PARAGON, OMNIV 



MX Towers, Antennas, 

Mobile Radio mounts 

stocked. Call. 




AMERITRON AUTHORIZED DEALER 



MAIL ALL ORDERS TO: BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP, , 512BROADWAY, NEW Y0RKCITY, NY 1001 2 (four euxxs north ofcmal st., between spring and broomest.) 



Maui Vai-It ritu»i LARGEST STOCKING HAM DEALER 

new TorR ^iiy s complete repair lab on premises 



"Aqul Sa Habla Espanol" 

BARRY INTERNATIONAL TELEX 12-7670 



Monday-Friday 9 AM to 6:00 PM. 

Saturday & Sunday 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. (Free Parking) 

IRT/LEX-"Spring St. Station". Subways: BMT- 
■ 'Prince St. Station". IND*"F" Train-Bwy Station" 
Bus: Broadway #6 to Spring St. Path*9th SU6th Ave. 
Station. 



COMMERCIAL RADIOS 
STOCKED: ICOM. Motoro- 
la. MAXON, Standard, 
Yaesu. We serve munici- 
palities, businesses, Civil 
Defense, etc. Portables, 
mobiles, bases, re* 
peats rs. 



ALL 
SALES 
FINAL 



We Stock: AEA, ARRL, Ameco, Ameritron, Antenna Specialists, Astatic, 
Astron, B&K, B&W, Belden, Bencher, Bird, Butternut, CDE t CES f Cushcraft, 
Daiwa, Eimae, Henry, Heil, Hustler, Hy-Gain , (com, KLM, Kantronics, Larsen, 
MJF S Mirage, Nye, Palomar, RF Products, Saxton, Shure, Tempo, Ten-Tec , 
TUBES, Yaesu, Vibroplex, Duplexers, Repeaters, Scanners, Radio 
Publications, Uniden, Kenwood, Maxon, RFC. 

WE NOW STOCK COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS 

HAM DEALER INQUWES INVETED PHONE *N YOUR ORDER & BE R&MBUHSED 
COMMERCIAL RADIOS stock* d « s*nrlc»d on pr«ml*«». 

Amateur Radio Courses Given On Our Premises, Call 

Export Orders Shlppad Immadlataly. TELEX 12*7670 



Technical help offered upon purchase 



FAX: 212-925-7001 



CIRCLE 41 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 7 on your Feedback card 



The Copperback Beetle 



A new type of "bug. " 



by Charles D. Rakes K15AZ 



In the May 1991 issue of 73 
Amateur Radio Today, I in- 
troduced the "Copperhead" key- 
er paddle that electronically re- 
places a mechanical paddle, Just a 
few days after the magazine came 
out, a fellow ham, Floyd Deen 
AA5QY, asked if I could design 
an electronic replacement for the 
cantankerous "Bug'* keyer. 
Here are the results. 

The ''Copperback Beetle" 
performs like the famous Bug- 
happily generating dits automati- 
cally, with the last dit a twin of the 
first, no matter how many are in between. 
Also, the built-in dit generator is self-com- 
pleting. Dahs are produced like the Bug— for 
as long as you like. And, like the Copperhead 
Keyer, the Beetle is touch-activated and will 
operate most commercial solid-state rigs with 
positive keying. 

The Beetle is an excellent trainer for any- 
one who wants to learn to use the mechanical 
Bug because you can slow the dit maker to a 
snail's pace, or rack it up to a machine-gun- 
like speed. If you've been up to your Adam's 
apple with dits trying to master a Bug, then 
give the Copperback Beetle a shot. You 
might even like its feather touch. 

Circuit Operation 

Look at the Beetle's schematic diagram in 
Figure 1 . See how few electronic components 




Photo A. The Copperback Beetle electronic bug. 

are needed to replace the many monkey-mo- 
tion mechanical parts used in a typical bug. 
Also notice that an on/off switch isn't needed 
because the standby current is almost nonex- 
istent. At rest, the battery will stay up for its 
normal shelf life. 

The heart of the beetle is a single 4093 
CMOS quad two-input NAND Schmitt 
trigger IC. The "dit" (left) paddle is con- 
nected to the input of gate "A" through a 
100k resistor, and on to the positive voltage at 
the output of pin #1 of gate 4 C , * * through 
four series 10 megohm resistors. The 
minute current flow through the 40 megohm 
resistors holds the gate's input high. In 
standby the gate's output, pin #3, is low. 
When your skin resistance bridges the pad- 
dle-to-circuit ground, the gate's output goes 
positive, starting the dit generator, which is 






R7i 

I DM? 



-A DOLE 



PITr-s^ 
£1^ 



F2 
300k 

Vyiji — 



C2 
39pF 






R 10 

-ViV- 



14 



r J VM>- 






DA 
-■■\DJ_L 






-'■vV^ 



R6 
I DM 

■R5 




-IT 



^J" 



n 



J> 



-±-C4 
'CM 



1 



ei 

9V 



rh 



Li ^v 



Rh 
ESQ* 



P 



Rl3 

IM 



' — wv — 



C3 
i 



HI 

IDOk 
-vw- 



CKT BD 
MAT 



1 



rn 



G 




u 



Dl 
IN5M4 

-N- 



CL 
39pF 



GND 
PLATE 



1C1 
4093 



IN9I4 



0| 

2M39oa 



r 



PHONE 
PLUG 



R42 — .^ 

4,7 k [T\ 



KEY r 

C5 OUTPUT^ 
'aOl 



A 



m 



Figure L Schematic diagram, 
20 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



made up of gates "C" and "D," 
The self-completing function is ac- 
complished when the output of gate 
4i C" (pin #10) goes low, holding 
the dit input circuitry low for the 
time duration of the dit. The posi- 
tive output at pin #1 1 of gate "D" 
passes through D2, turning on Ql 
to activate the keyed output during 
the dit period. 

The ■ L dah" (right) paddle circuit 
operates in a similar manner, with 
the positive output at pin #4 of gate 
4i B" passing through Dl, switch- 
ing Ql on to supply a keyed output. 
A 39 pF capacitor at the input of both the 
"A' ' and "B M gates routes any stray RF to 
circuit ground. 

Building the Beetle 

The Beetle uses the very same hard- 
wood base and paddle setup as the Cop- 
perhead keyer used (see Figures 2 and 3). 
The circuit can be constructed breadboard 
style or, to make the job easier, with a PC 
board. However you build it, take special 
care in handling and installing the CMOS 
chip. 

Woodworks 

Shape the keyer's base out of a hardwood 
block 3" x 8-1/2" x 1-1/4% as shown in 



top view 

OF KEYER 
(HAftDWOQD-1 



T 



2 1/4 ' 



-2 1/2— 
I J 



SIDE VIEW 



T, 

I 1/4' 



B 1/2 H 



\n 



PADDLE 
SPACER 



i ur 



Figure 2. Keyer and spacer dimensions. 



Courteous Service * Discount Prices ■ Fast Shipping 

ALL ELCCTItOniCS CORP. 

Mail Order Electronic Parts And Supplies 

P.O. Box 567 • Van Nuys, CA 91408 



Handset Coll Cord 



=3S 



JSiMiMt 



1 2" beige coif cord with modular plugs on each end. 
Small modular plugs for handset to phone connection. 
Retracted length is 2*. _ #& 

CAT* MCT-12 $4 >U 

10 for $12.50 ■ •■©!• 



PC BOARD WITH RF MODULATOR 
(and fots of other parts) 



-ti T - 




We recently received a load of these PC boards which 

contain, among other things, a RF modulator. With a 

little desolderhg you should be able to liberate a 

working unit from ihe board. Also contains 7EQ5T 

voltage regulator with a couple of heaisinks, 20 fCs, 

capacitors, resistors, diodes and connectors. No hook- 

up information available on the modulator. CAT# VMB-1 



*V S each 



Electroluminescent 

BACKLIGHTS 




At last I A low cost electroluminescent glow strip and 
inverter. These brand-new units were designed to back- 
light small LCD TVs made by the Citizen Watch 
Company, The inverter circuit changes 3 or 6 Vdc to 
approximately 100 Vac. the voltage required to light the 
gJowstr^). Luminescent surface area is 1 .7" X 2.25". The 
strip is a salmon color in its off state, and glows white 
when energized. The circuit board Is 2.2" X r. Glow 
strip and circuitry can be removed easily Irom plastic 
housing. Ideal for special lighting effects and 
backlighting. Two models available: 

Crtizartf 91TA operates on 3 Vdc CAT* BLU-91 

Citizen# 92 T A operates on 3 6 Vdc CAT# BLU-92 

LARGE 
QUANTITY 
A VAILABLE 

101or*32.00 • 100 for $275.00 



ELECTRET MIKE 



High elficiency. omni -directional, miniature 
eJectret condenser microphone element. LJ 

Low current drain, good signal to noise ratio, operates 
on 2 to 10 Vdc. Ideal tor telephones, tape recorders, 
noise- activated alarms and other applications. 0.39" dia 
X 0.31 "high. 

CAT#MIKE-10 AP^ 

200 pes. S 150.00 U > 




(75tf each) 



each 



wmMmEEMR&EimtNm 




:^AttWG&D£ttttytmWMf&pm&i&. 



UAA^ri^^U^AAAUI* 



TERMS: Minimum order $10.00. Shipping and handling 
for the 43 continental U.S.A. S3. 50 per order. Aft others 
including AK r Ht t PR or Canada mustpsy futf shipping. 
All orders delivered in CALIFORNIA must include state 
tales tax (? 25%, 7.5%, 7.75%, 8 .25% & 5%) .Quantities 
I Limited NOCOD Prices subject to change w/out notice. 



Call or WritB For Our 
FREE 64 Page Catalog 

(Outside Tho U.S.A. Send $2.00 Postage) 

ALL ELECTRONICS CORP. 

CA -91408 

CIRCLE 194 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Next D(l\ 



Sir* bo*, Wiscoisii 
Sa^Jf County 



ess: 



'two-Color 
IRnmbow Assortment 



W* Ship Sttibay 2nd Duy A&iP 



I life 11 

AtttennasWest 
t (801) 373 S425 



100 
200 
-100 

500 
1000 



$J9.95 
$49. 95 
$54. 95 

$99.95 



$24,95 

$S4 95 
£44.95 

S49.95 
$89.95 



SI 9. 95 
$29.95 
$39.95 
$44.95 



AIL rtrirn pfiJ 2iJ J±v iif .'priori ry mill. 
For ovemgJit lir delivery t44 510. 

Bos 5fJ06M, Prov* UT &4fiG5 



CIRCLE 5 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



LOWEST PRICES 



MFJ, 6W COMTEK, JPS, BENCHER, VIBROPLEX 

,S FLEXW£AVE" TB 169 STRAND COP., DACRONfiOPE, 

BALUn OPEN WIRE FEED, FREO. COUNTERS, 

DSPAFSNFFIlTEfla 

DAVIS RF Co. POB 230-E, Carlisle, MA 01741, 

CATALOG (1. 1-800484-4002, CODE 1356. 



BUILD YOUR OWN ANT'S 

COAX - ROPE - WIRE 



THE RF CONNECTION 

'SPECIALIST IN RF CONNECTORS AND COAX" 



Part No. 
PL259/USA 

aa-isp-ioso 

83-822 
PL259/ST 
UG175 
UG-176 



Description Price 

UHFMde Phenolic, US A made S .70 

PL-259 Phenolic, Ampheriol .89 

PL 259 Teflon, Amphenol 175 

UHFMate Silver Tef ton, USA 1.50 

Reducer for RG 58 .20 

Reducer for RG 59 A M IN I 8 .20 




RW 



GOLD QST 



N Male RG-S. 213, 214, large body 5.00 
N Male Pin for 9 &1 3, 9086, 8 2 1 4 

fits UG-21D/U & LJG-21B/U Ms 1.50 

N Male for RG-3 with 9913 Pin 3.95 

NMaleforRG-8with9913Pin 5.75 

N Male to SO 239, Teflon USA 600 

N Female to PL 259, Tef ton USA 6.00 

"THIS LIST REPRESENTS ONLY A 
FRACTION OF JUR HUGE INVENTORY" 



UG-21ByiJ 
9913/PIN 

(now in gold) 
UG-21D/9913 
UG-21B/9913 
UG-146A/U 
UG-S3B/U 



(SEE US IN DAYTON AT BOOTHS 1 55 & 156) 

THE R.F. CONNECTION 

213 North Frederick Ave. #11W 
Gaithersburg, MD 20877 

ORDERS 1 -800-783-2666 
INFO 301-840-5477 FAX 301-8G9-36SQ 

PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

VISA, MASTERCARD, ADD 4% 

UPS COD ADD $4. 00 PER ORDER 



n h pi mjL m w*m * irt.1j 



*-^ Nziwvrk view 



-•+fW I l.h.J? Tn nl 



AEA and Kantronics Owners: You nead 
the advanced features in PkGOLD for AEA and 
KaGOLD for Kantronics. Put away Pakratt, 
Hostmaster, Lan-Link Acuterm, even TCP/IP. 
Super! or features & performance In all modes. 

You Compare: 

File transfers, 

conferences, 

Multi-Session 

power, Cut and 

Paste buffer, 

Scroll Back 

buffers, Robot 

CQ mode in all 

non-Packet 

modes, Logging, Packet and ARQ Quick 

Connects, Screen blanker, DOS shell, and 



P* I tm- lin I ^— b 

■■hi a. Lin 

■ ■rill L4 — iC'^f 
■^ ■ kvun I ^^_ 

t Status A. fnjo 



r ■■•d -i|- ■; h-iii 



] 



f Function Keys 



■ Popup 



M/b- '.ml Wm\h 



much more. Requires 8088 to 80486 DOS 
systems, desk or laptop, 25/43/50 line mode. 
user selected colors, any serial port, runs in 
Windows & Desqyiew. KaGOLD requires ver 
5.0 ROM. PkGOLD runs on any AEA INC. Easy 
install, easy to run, powerful features, The 
choice of demanding users worldwide. 

How to Order: KaGOLD or PkGOLD with 
Manual, Online Help, Sound Tutor disk, 
Technical Support, Landline BBS access is 
only S79.95, plus $5 for S&H CA res add 
7.75% sales fax. Inter Flex Systems, PO Box 
6418, Laguna Niguel, CA 92607-6418. (714) 
496-6639. Include your callsign. VISA/MC 



mmmmmmmmmn 



:■ •* SSS .•■£■•■• ' 



CIRCLE 115 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 7? ON READER SERVICE CARD 



0ELIMINATE, 




NI-CAD Battery Problems! 




mm® 




DECHARGING SYSTEM 



Reody-Pak Jr. cures common Ni-Cad 
Memory* by property decharging Ni-Cad 
cells and pocks. Automatically stops dis- 
charge at proper level, then balances 
and equalizes cell voltages! For AAA, AA, 
C, & D groupings, or Ni-Cad packs which 
ere between 70 MaH and 1200 MaH. 
Mobile racio$,phones, RC hobby, cordess 
tools, etc, all use Ni-Cads - . , gef em back 
in shape with Ready -Pak Jr.! 

COMES WITH 3 CONNECTION SYSTEMS: Alligator c«pt, 9v battery incp, and Ac|ustabte Velcro 
system to fit AIL X-celver and ceWuky flat pocki, 

Chk, M,0. 



r^. 







CFL add 6% 
safes tax) 

FOR CAMCOBDERSh 

Ask for 
Reaay-Pak ll 
Dechorger. 
All 6, 9.6, 
12v packs. 
$44.95 



CHOOSE LO W 

OR H/GHRANGE 



LOW RANGE UNIT 

1br7.2*&4,9.6j lO.Svoit 

HI RANGE UNIT 

for 9.6, 10A 12, 13.2 volt 

*44,95 each (S*h fnchjd«i) 




(904) 385 - 9893 

Phone Holm 
1 lam - 7 pm, EST Mon - Frl 
381^7 N. Monroe ST. #15 

Tdkfta$see,R 32303 
MADEIN USA ) 



CIRCLE 142 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 21 



■3 t/4' 



— *j $*&" *- 



L 

UCSRCUFT B 
(2 REQ Q\ 



*— HOLE "A*-^p 
ARD PADDLE O - 



T 



t/z" 



|— 3/4 l! — 13/ 

-O Q 



HOLE "A" 



SIDE VIEW 



PADDLE SPACER BLOCK 




HOLE "A -TO CLEAR #6-32 

SCREW 



[—3/4'^ 



7 i 

1/2" J- 



* 



1/2' 



/T 



CJ^O 



-J i/g* U _J i/£" 



DRILL ANfJ TAP 

#6-32 

BOTTOM VIEW 



I I/?' 



HOLE THROUGH BASE 
FOR "LUG" FROM 
CKT BOARD GND 



HOLE "A 



S£^£ 



I 1/4 



* »| \/2"\^- 



2 I3/J6' 



"CIRCUIT BOARD MAT'l" COPPER SlUE UP 



i 



HOLE TO CLEAR 

WOOD SCREW 



■5/16' 



5 3/e ! 




FigureS. Paddle dimensions. 



Figure 2, Carve a 2- 1/2" long by 2-1/4" wide 
by 1" deep cavity in the base to hold the 
circuit board and battery, 

Cut a paddle spacer from the same hard- 
wood material to the dimensions shown in 
Figure 2. Cut two paddles from circuit board 
material to the size and shape shown in Figure 
3. Drill two holes in each paddle to match up 
with the two holes in the spacer block, then 
use a file or belt sander to round the corners 
of one end of each of the paddles. Smooth the 
edges with fine grit sandpaper. 

Now you can drill the paddle mounting 
holes through the side of the spacer block as 
shown, and then drill two holes in the bottom 
of the spacer. Thread each for a 6-32 metal 
screw. Drill four holes in the base, then 
mount the spacer board in place with two 
5/8" 6-32 screws. 

The grounding board, a section of circuit 
board 5-3/8" x 3", is mounted to the keyer's 



base with glue and a single wood screw. A 
long solder lug extends from the wood screw 
through a hole in the base (see photo of the 
completed key) to the cavity where it con- 
nects to circuit ground. 

The paddles are mounted to the spacer 
with nylon 6-32 screws and nuts. A long 
solder lug on each paddle is secured by the 
nylon hardware and extends through the 
base connecting to the circuit* as shown in 
Figure 1 . 

Figure 5 shows the component side of the 
circuit board and the parts placement. Mount 
the parts as shown and solder them in place. 
Then connect the paddles, grounding pad, 
battery snap, and output plug wires to the 
circuit board. 

Mount the circuit board, with the 1 
megohm pot towards the back, to the inside of 
the cavity with two 1/4" plastic spacers and 
wood screws. The battery is kept in place 



t 


Copperback Beetle Parts List 


B1 


9-volt transistor battery 


C1,C2 


39 pF ceramic disc cap 


C3,C4 


0.1 pF ceramic disc cap 


C5 


0.01 nF ceramic disc cap 


D1.D2 


1N9 14 silicon diodes 


1C-1 


4093 quad 2-input NAND Schmitt trigger 


Q1 


2N3904 NPN transistor 


R1,R2 


1O0k 1/4 watt resistors 


R3-R10 


10 megohm 1/4 watt resistors 


R11 


220K 1/4 watt resistor 


R12 


4.7k 1/4 watt resistor 


R13 


1 megohm pot 


Phono plug 


mini or standard 1/4" 


Misc.: 


Hardwood material, circuit board material, battery snap, nylon 




hardware, solder lugs, wire, solder, etc. 


You can buy 


a complete kit of parts, including a shaped base and spacer ready for stain or 


paint, paddles, hardware, circuit board, and all components, postpaid for $29.95 from 


Krystal Kits, 


P.O. Box 445, Bentonville AR 72712. 



Figure 4. PC board foil pattern. 

with an * *I/* bracket made from a spring steel 
9 volt battery holder, and is mounted to the 
edge of the cavity with a wood screw. 

Checking the Beetle Out 

With a battery in place t take a VOM in the 
RX-l position and connect the positive lead 
(don't rely on red to mean positive; check it 
out) of the meter to the tip of the keyer's 
output plug, and the meter's negative lead to 
the common sleeve on the plug. 

Position your wrist on the grounding pad 
and touch the * k dit" (left) paddle. The meter 
should go from infinite resistance to approxi- 
mately half -scale, and wiggle back and forth 
at the dit rate. Adjust R13 for the desired dit 
rate. Now touch the "dah** (right) paddle and 
the meter should go from infinite resistance to 
near zero. If so, you're ready to dit dah in 
style. 



Contact Charles D. Rakes KISAZat P. 0. Box 
445, Bentonville AR 72712. Please enclose 
an SASE* 



MOUNTING 
i-o. r 



TO DAk 
PA DO*. E 



'BftftEfrY 



PLATE 



KEY - 
OVTPUT 



MOUNTING 




Figure 5. PC board parrs placemen t. 



22 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 



RAMSEY ELECTRONICS 




1-3 
$279508 



2 WAY RADIO 
SERVICE MONITOR 



COM-3, Ihe world's most popular low-coat service moni- 
tor For shops big or small, the COM-3 defers advanced 
capabilities for a fantatic price — and our new lease pro- 
gram allows you to own a COM-3 for ress than $3.00 a day. 
Features "Direct entry keyboard wilh programmabie 
memory Mudio ft transmitter frequency counter *LETD bar 
graph frequency/error deviation display »Q. 1-10-000 wV 
outpui te*e«s 'High receive sensitwty. less than 5 uV 
• 100 kHz to 999.9995 MHz "Continuous frequency cover- 
age "Transmit protection, up to 100 watts *CTS tone 
encoder. 1 kHz and external modulation. 




RSG-10 
$249500 



SYNTHESIZED 
SIGNAL GENERATOR 

Finally, a tow-cost lab quality signal generator— a true 
alternative to the $7,000 generators. The RSG-10 is a 
hard working, but easy so use generator ideal for the lab 
as wen as for production lesi , Lease ii for less Than $3 .00 a 
day. Features + 100 kHz to 999 MHz * tOO Hz resolution to 
&00 MHz, 200 Hz above * - 1 30 to + 10 d£m output range 
•0,1 dB oulput ^solution *AM arid FM modulation «2Q 
programmable memories *Ou(put selection in volts, dB, 
dSm with instant conversion between units *Rf output 
reverse power protected *LEO display of all parame- 
ters— no analog guesswork I 



FREQUENCY COUNTERS 



GT-70 7 DIGIT 525 MHz 



CT-90 9 DIGIT 600 MHz CT-125 9 DIGIT 1.2 GHz 




Ramsey Electronics has teen manufacturing elec- 
tronic tesl gear for over 10 years and is recognized for 
Us Fab quality products at breakthrough prices. All of 
our counters carry a full one-year warranty on parts 
and labor We take great pride in being the largest 
manufacturer of low-cosi counters -in Ihe entire 
U.S.A. Compare specifications. Ourcounters are Full- 
featured* from audio to UHF. with FET high 
impedance input, proper wave shaping circuitry, and 
durable high quality epoxy glass plated -thru PC 
board construction. All units are 100% manufactured 
in the U.S.A. AH counters feature 1 .0 ppm accuracy. 




. :*-*■■_ 




NEW CT-250 2.5 GHZ 



ACCESSORIES FOR COUNTERS 

Telescopic ship antenna— BNC plug. WA-10 

High impedance probe, light loading, HP-1 

Low-pass probe, audio use, LP-i „,....,. 

Direct probe* general purpose use, DC-1 

Tilt bail, elevates counter for easy viewing. TQ-70 . . 

Rechafgeable internal battery pack, BP-4 

CT-90 oven lirnebase, 0.1 ppm accuracy, OV-1 



$11.95 

$16.95 
$16,95 

316.95 
£9.95 

. 58.95 
. 59-95 



ALL COUNTERS ARE FULLY WIRED & TESTED 



MODEL 



CT-so 



CT-70 



CT-90 



CT-T25 



CT-250 



PST0B 
PreSCaler 



FREQ. RANGE 



20 Hz-600 MHz 



20Hz~55O(WIHz 



10 Hz-600 MHz 
lOHz-t,£5GHz 



10 Hz-2.5 GHz 
typ«caFly3.0GHz 



!0MHz-t.5GHi, 
divide by 1000 



SENSITIVITY 



< 25 mV to 500 MH^ 



<50mVto 150 MH; 



<10mVto TSOMHz 
<t50mVto6aOMH2 



<25mVto50MHz 
<15mVto500MHz 
<100mVto1 GHz 



< 25 mV lo 50 MHz 

<10mVlo1 GHz 

< 50 mV to 2.5 GHz 



<50mV 




SPEED RADAR 
$89.95 

complete Kit 
SG-7 



lew low-cost microwave Do p pier 
idarkh "clocks" cars, planes, boats, 
arses,, bikes or any large movmg ob- 
ct. Operates at 2.6 GHz with up to 
f 4 mile range. LED digital readout 
isplays speed in miles per hour, kilo- 
ielers per hour or feet per second I 
arphone output allows for listening to 
:tual doppler shift. Uses two 1 -lb cof- 
e cans tor anlenna (not included) 
id runs on !2 VDC. Easy to build — 
I microwave circinlfy Is PCstriplme, 
33 plastic case with speedy graph- 
s for a professional look. A very use- 
i and f uH-cf-f un k-il . 



DIGITS 



a 



9 



RESOLUTION 



1 Hz, 10Hz 



1 Hz, 10 Hz, 100 Hz 



0.1 Hz, 10 Hz, 100 Hz 



0.1 Hz, 1 Hz, 10 Hz 



0.1 Hz, 1 Hz. 10 H? 



Convert your exigling counter 
to 1.5 GHz 



BROADBAND 
PREAMP 






Boost those weak signals to your 
scanner, Tv\ shortwave radio or fre- 
quency counter, Flat 25 dB gain, 1 to 
1000 MHz. 3 dB Nf . BNC connectors. 
Runs on 1 2 VDC or 1 10 VAC. 
PR-2, wired, includes AC adapter 
£59.95 



PRICE 



J1&9.95 



$139 95 



$1t>9.95 



11 89.95 



$249.95 



5S9 95 




JCROWAVE 
ITRUSION ALARM 

real microwave DnppFer 
jnsor that will detect a hu- 
an as f ar as 1 feet away, 
perates on 1 3 GHz, and is 
it aFlecied by heat, Tight, or 
brations. Drives up to tOO 
A output, normally Open or 
osed, runs on 12 VDC 
DmplotokitMD-3 . $19.95 



3NE DECODED 

Msnplete tone decoder 
a single PC brand. Fra- 
'6S: 409-5000 K2 30- 
.13 Die range via 20-tum 
E, triage 'egulatian. bfcj 1 
. Useful lrjr irjuch-tOne 
r&1 rj«&c1ion, F5K, elc. 
n also be iiied is a sl&- 
■ lone c-ncccv ' FUms en 

mplele kit, TD-1 £595 



CKLE STfK 

stvocking kit! BJink- 
; LED atlraols vic- 
is to pick up mno- 
mt-looking can— 
iu walch (he fun^ 
sal for oHJce desks, 
irties. nosey kngw- 
lll&l 
5^4 kit $9.95 



2M POWER AMP 

Easy to build power amp has B times 
power gain, 1 W in. SW oul, £W in, 
1 6W oul, 5W is for 40W out. Same 
amp as featured in many ham mag- 
azine articles. Complete with all 
pans, less case and T-fl retay. 

PA-T, 40W pwr amp kit $34.95 

TR-1 -, RF sensed T R relay kit $ 9,95 



MUSJC MACHINE 

rteal k\l thai will produce 25 cSNer 
gm dassical and papula-' lunes. 
plus 3 docrchime sounds Lots cf 
fun For coorballs. shop, or store eJt- 
i'dives, car hom, music soties, elc 
Runs on 9V baltery or wall t r an& 
igrmar Excellent speaker voij'ia 
SAd fld|nslab»e le^ipo and pilch. 
Add our case set lc a handteome 
finished took. 

Coffltfete kH, MM-5 3^4.95 

Case i knob set, CM M-b . E'2.S6 



FM WIRELESS 
MIKE KITS 

FM-3 
SHOWN 

Pick the unit that's right for you. All 
units transmit stable signal in 58- 
tOfl MHz FM band up to 300' except 
for hi power FM-4 that goes up to te? 
mile. 

FM-1 , basic unit $ 5.95 

FM-2, as above but with added mike 
preamp $7.95 

FM-4, Jong range, high power wi(h 
very sensitive audio section, picks 
up voices 1 0' away $14.95 

FM-3, complete unit includes case, 
battery, switch, antenna, and built-in 
condenser mike. Excellent fidelity, 
very small, kit . $16.95 

FM-3WT. as above, but fully wired 
and tested $19.95 

SMC. miniature sensitive mike car- 
tridge lor FM-1, 2. 4 $ 2.95 



PACKET flADIO 

Two new versions are available 
for |he Commodore 64 (P-64A) 
or Ihe IBM-PC fP- IBM). Eoaygg, 
sembly "NO TUNfNG". Fn- 
clusdes FREE tflsk software, PC 
Boa»'d and FuR Documentation. 

KIT P-«4A $5995 

P-IGM $59.95 

CASE CPK $12.95 



LO NOISE PRE AM PS 

Make lhat reciever come 
ALIVE I Small size lor easy 
installation with Hi-Q tuned 
input for peak performance. 
Excellent gain and noise fig- 
ure — guaranteed to improve 
reception? Specify band: 
3M— Pfl-10, 220 MHz— PR- 
20, 440 MHz— PR -40. 
Each kit $1 7.95 



VOICE ACTIVATED 
SWITCH 

Voice act i vated 
switch kit provides 
switched output with 
current capability up 
to 100 mA. Can drive 
relays, lighls, LED. or 
even a tape recorder 
motor, fluns on 9 
VDC. 
VS-1 kit $6.95 



LIGHT BEAM 
COMMUNICATORS 
Transmits audio over 
infrared beam up to 
30'— use simple lens- 
es to go up to 'A rn He I 
Hum free, uses 30 kHz 
carrier Great Ipr wire- 
less earphones or un- 
detectable "bug." 
Transmitter - receiv- 
er set, LB56 . . 519.95 



TELEPHONE 
TRANSMITTER 

Mini-sized wilh profes- 
sional performance. 
Self-powered trom 
phone line, transmits 
in FM broadcast band 
up to Mi mile. Installs 
easily anywhere on 
phone line or inside 
phone! 
PB-1 kit $14.95 



NEW 



FM RADIO 

Fufl'flcdged superhet. 
microvolt sensitivity, 
fC detector and 10.7 
MHz IF. Tunes Strt. 
FM broadcast band as 
wetF as large portions 
on each end- Ideaf for 
"bug" receiver, hob- 
by experiments or 
even as FM radio! 
FR-1 kit $14 95 



SPEAKER PHONE 

Talk on Ihe phone hands-free, great to put in 
shop or shack, press the button (o answer — no 
actual phone needed. Works same as commer- 
cial units. Talk from anywhere in room, phone 
line powered— r>o battery needed. Super (or 
family and conference calls or buy two for 
hands-free Intef com! Add our case set for a pro 
look, 
SP-1 $29.35 Case-CSP $12.95 



SUPER SLEUTH 

A super sensitive am» 
plifier which will pick 
up a pin drop at 15 
teeil Great (of moni- 
toring baby's room or 
as general purpose 
amplilier. Full 2W rms 
oulput. Runs on 6 to 
15 volts, uses S-45 
ohm speaker. 
BN-9 kit 55 95 



JL 



BROADBAND 
PREAMP 

Very popular sensitive 
all-purpose preamp. 
ideal lor scanner, 
TVs, VHF/UHF rigs. 
counters. Lo noise, 20 
d8 gain, tt)0 kHz-1 
GHz, 9V-12 VDC Op- 
eration. 
SA-7M. .. $14-95 



•2 METERS 
•223 MHz 

•440 MHz 




$149 



95 



FANTASTIC 
FM TRANSCEIVERS 

SYNTHESIZED IVO GFtYSTAlS 

Ramsey breaks the price barrier on FM rigs! The FX is ideal for shack, 
portable or mobile. The wide frequency coverage and programmable re- 
pealer splits makes trie FX the perfect rig for Amateur, CAP or MARS 
applications. Packeteers really appreciate the dedicated packet port, 
■T.HUE-FM" signal and almost instant T/R switching. High speed packet? 
... .No problem. Twelve diode programmed channels, 5W HF output, 
sensitive dual conversion receiver and proven EASY assembly. Why pay 
more for a used foreign rig when you can have one AMERICAN MAD£ {by 
you) For less. Comes complete less case and speaker mike. Order our 
matching case and knob set lor that pro look. 

FX-1 46 kit (2 Meters} ;...., $149.95 

FX-223 kJI fm Meters) . , , $149,95 

FX-440 til (3/4 Meters) $109-95 

CFX matching case set $ 24.95 



2 MTR & 220 BOOSTER AMP 

Here's a great booster for &ny 2 meter or 220 MHz hand-held unit. 
These power boosters deUver over 30 watts of output, allowjng you to 
hit the repeater's full quieting while the low noise preamp remarkably 
improves reception. Ramsey Electronics has sold thousands of Z meter 
amp kits, bul now we oHer completely wired and tested 2 meter, as well 
as 220 MHz. units. Both have all the features of the high-priced boost- 
ers ai a fraction of the cost. 
PA-10 2 MTR POWER BOOSTER {10 X power gain) 

Fulry wired & tested $59-95 

PA-20 220 MHz POWER BOOSTER (6 X power gain} 

Fully wined & tested $69. 95 




QRP TRANSMITTERS HAM RECEIVERS 



20, 3D, 40, 80M 
CW TRANSMITTERS 







20, 30, 40, 80M 
All Mode RECEIVERS 



Join trie lun on QRP! Thousands of these mini-rigs have 
been sold and tons of DX contacts have been made. 
Imagine working Eastern Europe with a $30 transmit- 
ler — that's ham radio at its best! These CW rigs are ideat 
mates to the receivers at light. They have nwo-position 
variable crystal control (one popular ORP XTAL includ- 
ed), one watl oulput and built-in antenna switch. Runs on 
1 2 VDC. Add our matching case and knob set lor a hand' 
some finished look. 

Your choice Of bands ..,..,. S29.95 

(Specify band: QRP-20, 30 r 40 or 50) 
Matching case & knob set, CQflP $12.95 



E-Z KEY CMOS KEYER 



Send perfeel CW wJthln an hour of receiving this kill 
Easy-to-build kii has sidetone oscillator, speed control 
and keys most any transmitter. Runs for months on a 9 V 
battery. 26-oage manual gives ideas on making your 
own key for extra savings. Add our matching case sei 
for complete slation look. 

CW^7 kit ... , ,....,. $24 ,9S 

Matching case knob set, CCW $12.95 



ACTIVE ANTENNA 



Cramped for space? Get longwire performance wilh 
this desktop antenna. Properly designed unit lias dual 
HF and VHF circuitry and built-in whip antenna, as well 
as external Jack. RF gain control and 9V operah'on 
makes unit ideal for SWLs, traveling hams or scanner 
butts who need hotter reception. The matching case 
and knob set gives ihe unit a hundred doHar lookl 

AA-7 Kit 524 95 

Matching case & knob sel, CAA 112-95 



SPEECH SCRAMBLER 



Communicate in total privacy over phone or radio, Kil 
features full duplex operation using frequency inver- 
sion. Both mike and speaker or fine infoul connections. 
Easy hookup to any radio, and telephone use requires 
no direct connection? Easy to build 2 IC circuit. Can also 
be used lo descramble many 2-way radio signals. Fin- 
ish your kit off with the handsome ease 4. knob set, 

SS-7 kit $29.95 

Matching case & knob set, CSS $12.95 



SHORTWAVE RECEIVER 



Build your own mini ham station. Sensitive all-mode 
AM, CW, SSB receivers use direct conversion design 
with NE602 IC as featured in QST and AHHL hand- 
books. Very sensitive varaetor tuned over entire band. 
Plenty of speaker volume. Runs on 9V battery. Very 
EASV to build, lots of lun and educaiional^ideal for 
beginner or old pro. New 30-page manual. Add Ihe case 
sel 'or well-fitted professional look. 

Your choice of bands ,. + $29.95 

(Specify band: HR-20, HR-30. HR-40. HR-80) 
Matching case & knob sel, CHR ,...,,,, $12.95 



2, 6, 10 MTR, 220 
FM RECEIVERS 





Keep an ear on the local repeater gang, monitor the cops, 
check out the weather or just plain listen around. These 
sensitive superhet receivers are just the ticket. They tune 
any 5 MHz portion of ihe band and have smooth varacior 
tuning, dual conversion wilh ceramic IF filters, AFC, ad- 
justable squelch and plenty of speaker volume. Runs on 
9V battery and performance that rivals the big rkjsl For a 
complete finished pro look, add our matching case and 
knob set with screened graphics. 

FM communications receiver kit . , , $29-95 

Specify band: FR 146 (2m), FR6 (5m). FRlQ^lOm), FR- 

220 (220 MHz) 
Matching case 4 knob set, CFR $ 12.95 



FM STEREO TRANSMITTER 



Run your own stereo FM station! Transmit a stable signal 
in the siandard FM broadcast band throughout the house, 
dorm or neighborhood. Connects easily to line outputs on 
CD player, (ape decks, etc. Runs on W battery, has 
Internal whip antenna and external antenna jack. Add our 
case set for a "station" took' 

FM-10 kit , $29.95 

Matching case sel, CFM $1295 



AIRCRAFT RCVR 



Fantasia receiver that captures the world with Just a 
1 2" antenna' Can receive any 2 MHz portion irom 4-1 1 
MHz. True superhet hassmoo'h varaetor tuning, AGC. 
RF gain control , plenty of speaker vol ume and runs on a 
9V battery. Fascinating Scout, school or club project 
provides hours ol Fun for even the most serious DXer. 
For the car, consider our shortwave converter. Two 
switehable bands (rn 3-22 MHz range), each i MHz 
wide— Tunable on your car radio dial. Add some interest 
to your drive homel 

Shortwave receiver kit, SRI $27.95 

Shortwave converter kit, SCI $27.95 

Matching case set for SRI, CSR $12.95 

Matching case set for SC|, CSC $12.95 




Hear exciting aircraft communications — pick up planes 
up to 100 miles away! Receives H0-i35 MHz AM air 
band, smooth varaetor tuning superhet with AGC< ce- 
ramic filter, adjustable squelch, excellent sensitivity and 
lots o! speaker volume. Runs on 9V battery. Great for air 
shows or jus' Hanging around the airpoil Mew 30-page 
manual details pilot talk, too., Add case set tor "pro" 
look. 

rT-r"!" " "Ml ■■■ ■■■■■ ■ i ■*■>■'■ ■ |i ib ■ > '■ i ■■■■■'■■■■■■■■ ^S»v** i y>J 

Matching case set. CAR . r , $12.95 



TERMS: Sanaratlirin CfUflTanie*d EiamiYit tor' 10 
d^VS ' f n 0t pfPSSed rpJum in oriftinjl 1onn 1qf rg- 
rur.d. "Add 53.75 ror shipping. rwndlHig and \n- 
SuranCfr. » Far lOrejgji Orders j)<Jrt JORi Ifr tgrface 
mail. 'COO {U.S. onlvl- add SS.ao. +Order!i 
UPdtfrSSft, *drf SJ. 00 «rdV ccsidcnls 3<W 7% 
sales 1-ax. -90-doif parts. warranty on Ml parts. 
* 1 ■ ^ ear pari* £ labo? warranty tn *ni*d uriita . 

RAMSEY ELECTRONICS, INC. 



, PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-924-4560 

1 FAX 716-924-4555 

793 Canning Parkway, Victor, NY 14564 



CIRCLE 34 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



GO WITH THE WORLD LEADER IN LOGGING SOFTWARE! 



The WB20PA LogMaster 



HF Logging System for PC Compatibles 



♦ QSY and Send DX Spots from OX Packet Cluster Window. 

♦ Kenwood, Slcorn, and Yaesu Rigs, Supported, 

♦ Import K1EA CT (Or Any Other Format Upon Request). 

♦ Auto "Needs" Indicator As You Enter Log information. 



♦ Used By The Gordon West Radio School 

♦ Featured At The W5MIR Space Exhibit 

♦ Simple To Operate, Full Featured, and Very Powerful. 

♦ 30 Day Money Sack Guarantee 



$69.95 Complete, Demo Disk $5.00 (Refundable With Purchase) 

Sensible Solutions 

P.O. Box 474, Middletown, NJ 07748, U.S.A., Tel; 1-800-538-0001 

Outside of U.S. And Canada: (908) 495-5066 
VISA and MasterCard Accepted 

"Professional Software For The Radio Amateur, - The Difference Is Gfoir To $e&*\ 
Come See US at Dayton Booth #4&9 Eurg P ean ^stributor : L E, Reimers Box 213, 5-261 23 Landskrona, Sweden Tel: 0418-13926 




CIRCLE 95 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



AMATEUR RADIO EQUIPMENT 



CALL 



$rJR I 



nc. 



800-942-8873 

For Your Best Price 



Authorized dealer for Icom, Kenwood, Yaesu, 
ASTRON, Belden, Bencher, AEA, Cushcraft, MFJ, RF 
Concepts, Hustler, Kantronics, Wilson, Diamond, 
Ham- 10, Larsen, Wm. M. Nye, B&W, ARRL, Ameritron, 

Epson, Farr Corner, DTK 



1057 East 2100 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 

801-467-8873 



CIRCLE 1S6 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




AMSAT Has Established Amateur Radio 
As a Permanent Resident in Space! 

From operating any of 12 Amateur satellites circling the globe today to 
partiefpating in Amateur Radio activities from the Space Shuttle, the benefits of 
space based Amateur Radio are available to you by becoming an AMSAT 
member. Our volunteers design, build and launch state-of-the-art satelites for use 
by Radio Amateurs the world over. We provide educational programs that teach 
our young people about space and Amateur Radio. Most of all, we provide our 
members with an impressive array of member benefits including: 

• Operating aides such as discounted tracking software and land line BBS. 

• An extensive network of volunteers to provide you local technical assistance. 

• The AMSAT Journal, your bi-monthly periodical devoted to the 
Amateur Space program. 

It *s Fun! It's Easy! It's Exciting! 

JOIN TODAY, For more information, call or write for your free 
information packet. Or send your dues now, check or charge; $30 U.S., 
$36 Canada f Mexico, $45 all else. ($15 towards the AMSAT journal.) 



AMSAT, P. O. Box 27, Washington, D.C. 20044 

(301) 589-6062; Fax: (301) 608-3410 



RF POWER 
AMPLIFIERS 



NEW! 

400 
WATTS 

'(144-148 MHz} 



Pin Pout Ic Gain/NF (13.8 V) 
Model (W) (W) (A)(dB)(dB) Typa 



5DMHz 

G508G 

05DSR 

051DG 

0510R 

0550Q 

0550RH 

05526 



1 170 28 15/0,6 

1 170 28 -/- 

10 170 25 15/0.6 

10 170 25 ~h 

10 400 60 15/0.6 

10 400 60 -/- 

25-40 400 55 15/0.6 

0552 RH 25-40 400 55 -/- 



Standard 
Repeater 
Standard 



NPA 
Repeater HPA 

HPA 
Repeater HPA 



14036 


1-5 


10-5Q 


6 


15/0.6 


LPA 


14690 


2 


150 


25 


15/0.0 


Standard 


1409R 


2 


150 


24 


-h 


Repeater 


141DG 


10 


100 


25 


15/0.6 


Standard 


1410R 


10 


160 


24 


■+- 


Repeater 


1 41 20 


25-45 


160 


20 


15/0,6 


Standard 


f*12l 


25-45 


too 


19 


-/- 


Repeater 


1450G 


to 


400 


54 


15/0.6 


HPA 


1450HH 


10 


400 


54 


-f- 


Repeater HPA 


1452G 


25 


400 


50 


15/0.6 


HPA 


1452RH 


25 


400 


50 


-/- 


Repeater HPA 


14546 


50-130 


400 


45 


1 5/0,6 


RPA 


1454RH 50 100 

OOfl MUt 


400 


45 


-h 


Repeater HPA 


2210Q 10 


130 


20 


12/0 J 


Standard 


2210R 


10 


130 


10 


-h 


Repealer 


2212G 


30 


130 


15 


1 2/0 J 


Standard 


2212R 


30 


130 


15 


-/- 


Repeater 


2250G 


10 


220 


42 


1 4/0.7 


HPA 


2250RH 


10 


280 


45 


-h 


Repeater HPA 


2252G 


25 


220 


36 


1 4/0.7 


HPA 


2252 RH 

A Aft Mil 


25 

m 


280 


40 


-/- 


Repeater HPA 


44100 10 


100 


13 


1 0/1 .1 


Standard 


441 on 


10 


100 


10 


-h 


Repeater 


4412G 


20-30 


100 


19 


10/1.1 


Standard 


4412R 


20-30 


100 


16 


-h 


Repeater 


44500 


10 


175 


34 


12/1.1 


HPA 


4450 RE 


10 


175 


34 


-/- 


Repeater HPA 


4452 G 


25 


175 


29 


12/1 J 


HPA 


4452RE 


25 


175 


29 


-h 


Repeater HPA 






W-v- -V. 


dHBr/ 


tf 


fel 




™ . W- ™; 




MODEL 1410G 




MODEL 14506 



All amplifiers (non-rplr) are linear, all-made with fully 
automatic T/R switching and PIT capability. The receive 
preamps use GaAs FET devices rated at .5 dB N F with +1 8 
dOm 3rd order IP LPA. Standard and HPA amps are 
intermittent duly design suitable lor base and mobile 
operation, Repeater amps are continuous duty, class C* 

Amplifier capabilities: High-power, narrow or wide- 
band; 100-200 MHz, 225-400 MHz; 1-2 GHz, Military 
(28V), Commercial, etc, - consult factory. A complete line nf 
Rx preamps also available. 



RX Preamplifiers 

NF Gain 
Band Model [dB) (dB) Connector 



CIRCLE 1 10 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



50 MHz 
50 MHz 
144 MHz 
144 MHz 
220 MHz 
220 MHz 
440 MHz 
440 MHz 



052GB 
0520H 
1420B 
1420N 
22200 
2220 N 
4420 B 
4420H 



.5 
.5 
.5 
.5 

,5 
.5 
.5 
.5 



25 
25 
24 
24 
22 
22 
16 
18 




Consult your local dealer or send directly for 
further product information. All Products Made in 
USA. 




TE SYSTEMS 

P.O. Box 258 4 5 

Us Angeles, CA 90025 



FAX 213-473-403B 



CIRCLE 232 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



24 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 



Numbers on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Bill Clarke WA4BLC 



The MFJ-247 

Antenna Analyzer 

SWR analyzer with a built-in frequency counter. 



MFJ Enterprises, Inc. 
P.O. Box 494 

Mississippi State MS 39762 

Telephone: (800) 647-1600 

Price Class: $190 



Last year I reviewed the MFJ^207 HF SWR 
analyzer from MFJ (see the January T 91 
issue, p. 18). It is an excellent device and it 
sure hefped me sel up my antenna system. 
This unit had a mechanical dial which gave me 
a good relative idea of the antenna's resonant 
point. However, to determine the exact reso- 
nant frequency, the user has to set up the unit 
by either beating a signal on a receiver or 
using an outboard frequency counter. 

This was not a real problem for me , as I had 
a battery-operated counter and could plug it 
into the analyzer to get exact frequency read- 
out. But suppose I didn't have a counter, or 
didn't want to carry two separate devices and 
their connection wires? Why not a combina- 
tion unit that reads the SWR and frequency 
simultaneously? Well, that is exactly what 
MFJ has done with their model MFJ-247 HF 
SWR Analyzer. 

What is an SWR Analyzer? 

The MFJ-247 is used to accurately find the 
SWR of an antenna at the shack feedline, the 
antenna, the tuner, or any point between. No 
RF signal is required from your transmitter 

The new analyzer is completely portable for 
field use, meaning no trips back to the shack 
to check SWR on your antenna. It provides a 
means for eliminating on-the-air tune-ups for 
setting up antennas, or when adjusting a 
tuner, Trimming and adjusting can be done at 
the same time measurements are made. 

Using the MFJ-247 In the Field 

Although the analyzer is very simple to op- 
erate, a quick read of the instruction manual is 
advisable. It won't take more than five min- 
utes, as the instructions are clear and simple 

Using the analyzer for setting up a new 1 60 
meter dipole, I initially figured the leg lengths 
of the dipole to be 126.5 feet each. I cut the 
legs a couple of feet over-size (a recommend- 
ed practice). After assembly, the antenna was 
hauled into place. Connecting the analyzer to 
the feedline at the base of the tower, I selected 
the 1 .8-2.9 MHz band (the other bands are 
3.2-5.3, 6.5-11, 12-21, 18-30 with overrun 
on each). The tuning knob was slowly turned 
until the meter showed the lowest SWR point. 

When the lowest point was located, I read 
the frequency from the LCD indicator, which 
showed 1.795 MHz* I brought the antenna 
down and trimmed some wire off each leg, 




Photo A, The MFJ-247 digital SWR analyzer. 

raised it again, and rechecked the lowest 
SWR point. The readout was 1.846 MHz. 
Close enough! 

The dipole was put in place and tuned with* 
out returning to the shack. There were no on- 
the-air tune-ups, I merely connected the an- 
tenna's feedline to my remote antenna switch 
and was finished with my outside work. 

Checking Feedlines in the Shack 

I hooked the analyzer onto the feedline in 
my shack to assure that all was going to work 
as planned. A patch line was run from my 
transceiver selection switch to the SO-239 on 
top of the analyzer. I checked each antenna 
for exact the frequency of the lowest SWR, 
and made a notation in my station log. 

If you are unsure of an antenna's SWR at a 
specific frequency, just tune the analyzer until 
it displays that frequency and read the SWR 
from the meter. 

It is particularly interesting to make SWR 
plots of muftiband antennas. Generally you 
will discover there are multiple points of low 
SWR, often where you may not expect Ihem. 



Graph paper will help you make permanent 
records of the SWR plots of your antennas. 

Adjusting a Tuner With the 247 

You can use the SWR Analyzer as an aid in 
adjusting an antenna tuner without putting out 
a carrier on the air. By using a good quality self- 
grounding coax switch, you can select between 
the transmitter and the analyzer on the input 
side of an antenna tuner. Once selected, tune 
the analyzer to the frequency you will be trans- 
mitting on and adjust the tuner for the lowest 
SWR reading on the analyzer's SWR meter. 

Just switch the feedline back to the trans- 
mitter and you are ready to operate. A word of 
warning: DO NOT TRANSMIT INTO THE AN- 
ALYZER or you will fry itl 

Frequency Counter 

The analyzer also functions as a frequency 
counter with up to six decimal places of dis- 
play (i.e. 146.310025 MHz). This gives the 
MFJ-247 a dual purpose; an SWR analyzer 
and a frequency counter in one box, 

I should note that the counter is not very 
sensitive, and, as is mentioned in the manual, 
the use of a ' limes 1 " probe is recommended. 
For service work inside a transceiver this 
would be necessary, but for general frequen- 
cy checking a rubber-duck on the top BNC 
connector is sufficient. 

The manual has some good information 
about coax feedline losses and explains why 
high SWR can increase these losses- Also 
included is a sample SWR antenna plot chart, 
which can be copied. 

My Recommendation 

I enjoyed working on my antenna system 
with the original antenna analyzer and using 
the MFJ-247 just makes it easier since every- 
thing is inside one box. 

Anyone working with antennas will find a 
use for the analyzer. It will be a real help for 
tuning a beam on top of a tower and setting the 
bands on a vertical. Also, the idea of "a no- 
carrier tune-up" is excellent. 



Specifications 

Dimensions: 4 x 7.5 x 2.5 inches (WHD) 

Frequency: 1 75-33.5 MHz 

Power: 1 2 VDC # 300 mA 

Batteries; 6 AA 

Counter Sensitivity: 000 mV 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May d 1992 25 



Number 9 on your Feedback card 



Battery Watchdog 

Keeps your battery up to snuff. 



by Martin E, McCoy WB0TCZ/7 



My station runs primarily from a 12 volt 
deep cycle battery under the shack, 
providing emergency power capability at a 
moment \s notice. However, my 2 meter all- 
mode with a 170 watt linear drains the battery 
rapidly during my sessions as Net Control, 
and my other station equipment just adds in- 
sult to injury. With more 12 volt equipment 
planned, and my habit of forgetting to turn 
the charger on and off as needed to keep my 
battery fully (but not over) charged, 1 needed 
something to monitor my battery status and 
keep it charged. 

With this in mind. I decided my battery 
watchdog should turn a charger on when the 
battery voltage drops below 1 1 volts, and turn 
it off when the battery voltage rises to 14 
volts. 

The parts for the watchdog are easy to find 
at Radio Shack, a discount store and a quick 
stop at a TV/stereo repair shop (or parts 
house) , (See the Parts List.) If you refer to the 
schematic (Figure 1), my explanation of this 
circuit will make more sense. 

Charger On 

Zcner diode Dl conducts as long as the 
battery voltage is over 1 1 volts. To maintain a 
stable voltage, this diode must conduct at 
least i 1 mA, and since I don't want to draw 
more power than necessary, the scries resis- 
tor of 680 ohms will keep the current down to 
a reasonable 16 mA. Since I wanted a high 
(logic 1) signal when the battery voltage 
drops below 1 1 volts, I used the 1 1 volt out- 
put from the zener regulator to drive one of 
the four gates in the 4001 CMOS quad's two- 
input NOR gate. By tying the two inputs to 
this NOR gate together, it functions as an 
inverter. Since it is a CMOS gate, it will 
operate directly from the 12 volt battery, and 
an 1 1 volt input won't harm it. 

Charger Off 

Zener diode D2 conducts when the battery 
voltage exceeds 14 volts. To maintain a stable 
voltage, D2 must conduct at least 8,9 mA, 
and since 1 don't want to draw more power 
than necessary, the series resistor of 1200 
ohms will keep the current down to a reason- 
able 12 mA. Since this zener regulator pro- 
vides the high (logic 1 ) output 1 want when the 
battery voltage exceeds 14 volts, no inverter 
is necessary, 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May , 1992 



12V BAtTEftY 



t 



Si 



0PTlDM4L( 



© 




■ .". 



|4 



iCi 

4Q-DI 



x 



I 



1 



1C2 

4QI 1 



f77 



} 



\ 



m 



Ql 
I IV 



1/4 4001 



til 

MOO 




D2 



D Q 

1/2 4013 



1 



fi 3 

soooo 

— *w* — 




I ' l J*LUC 



NC 



mot mm. 



f»2 



D3 



r 



m 



Kl 

NO 



EXTENSION 
CQHO 



fh 




[)) RECEPTACLE 



Figure L The schematic diagram of the battery watchdog. 



Charger Control 

One of the flip-flops in the 4013 CMOS 
dual D type flip-flop is used to turn the 
charger on and off. If the Q output is connect- 
ed to the D (Data) input and the clock input is 
grounded, then it behaves as an R-S flip-flop. 
In other words, when a high (logic 1) is 
applied to the S (Set) terminal, Q goes high 
and remains there until a high is applied to 
the R (Reset) terminal, causing Q to go low 
(logic 0), 

Operation 

Assume that the flip-flop is off— that is, its 
Q output is low. With Q low, no current is 
supplied to the NPN Darlington Ql, it 
doesn't conduct and relay Kl is open, leaving 
the battery charger off. 

When the battery becomes discharged, the 
voltage available drops below 1 1 volts. The 
regulator circuit containing Dl ceases to con- 
duct, removing the input from ICI . Since IC 1 
is a NOR gate operating as an inverter, a lack 
of input causes the output to go high. Since 
this output is connected to the S (Set) input of 
IC2 (the flip-flop), the output Q goes high. 
This high output passes through R3 to keep 
the base current through Ql to a reasonable 



value. Since Ql is a Darlington transistor 
with a gain of at least 2500, this small current 
through the base is more than sufficient to 
allow the transistor to pass the 38 mA re- 
quired to pull relay Kl in. When this relay is 
energized, the battery charger begins charg- 
ing the battery. 

When the battery charger starts charging 
the battery, the voltage available rises above 
11 volts. This causes the regulator circuit 
containing Dl to begin conducting, supply- 
ing a high to the input of IC 1 . As you remem- 
ber, IC 1 acts as an inverter, so its output goes 
low, removing the high to the S (Set) input of 
IC2. But the output Q of the flip-flop remains 
high because the R (Reset) terminal is not 
receiving a high from the regulator circuit 
containing D2. 

When the battery is fully charged > the bat- 
tery voltage exceeds 14 volts. The regulator 
circuit containing D2 conducts, supplying a 
high to the R (Reset) input of IC2. When this 
happens, the flip-flop resets, output Q goes 
low and transistor Ql stops conducting, re- 
leasing relay Kl. The battery charger stops 
charging. 

The diode across the coil of relay Kl 
clamps the voltage spike that occurs when 



& 



ASTROIM 

CORPORATION 



9 Autry 

frvine, CA 92718 

[714)458-7277 




MODEL VS-50M 



ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

HEAVY DUTY • HIGH QUALITY • RUGGED * RELIABLE 



SPECIAL FEATURES 

• SOLID STATE ELECTRONICALLY REGULATED 

• FOLD-BACK CURRENT LIMITING Protects Power Supply 
from excessive current & continuous shorted output 

• CROWBAR OVER VOLTACE PROTECTION on ail Models 
mm RS-3A, R5-4A. RS-5A. RS4L. RS-5L 

• MAINTAIN REGULATION & LOW RIPPLE at tow line input 
Vott^Qe 

• HEAVY DUTY HEAT SINK • CHASSIS MOUNT PJSE 

• THREE CONDUCTOR POWER CORD except for RS-3A 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY • MADE IN USA, 



PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS 

• INPUT VOLTAGE: 105-125 VAC 

• OUTPUT VOLTAGE: 13.8 VDC ± 0.05 volts 
(Internally Adjustable: 11-t5 VDC) 

• RIPPLE Less than 5mv peak to peak (full load & 
low line) 

• All units available in 220 VAC input voltage 
(except lor SL-11A) 



SLSE 




MODEL 



Colors Continuous 

Gray Black Duty [Amps) 



LOW PROFILE POWER SUPPLY 
SL11A • * 7 



ICS* 
lAmpsJ 



11 



Size [INI 
H*W*D 



2% x 7% x 9% 



Shipping 
Wl (IhsJ 



11 



RS-L SERIES 




Continuous ICS* Size (IN) 

MODEL Duty (Amps) (Amps] H - W ■ D 

• POWER SUPPLIES WITH BUILT IN CIGARETTE LIGHTER RECEPTACLE 
RS4L 3 4 3ft x 6ft x 7ft 

RS-5L 4 5 3ftxGftx7V* 



Shipping 
WL (lb*] 

6 
7 




19" RACK MOUNT POWER SUPPLIES 

Continuous 
MODEL Duly (Amps) 



RM SERIES 



MODEL RM-35M 



RS-A SERIES 




MODEL RS-7A 



RM-12A 

RM-35A 

RM 50A 

RM-60A 

Separate Volt and Amp Meters 

RM-12M 

RM-35M 

RM-50M 

RM-60M 



9 
25 
37 
50 

9 
25 
37 
50 



ICS* 

(Amps) 
12 
35 
50 
55 

12 
35 
50 

55 



Size [IM| 

HxWxD 

5ft x 19 x 8ft 

5% x 19 x 12ft 

5'/- x 19 x 12ft 

7 x 19 x 12ft 

5 r Ax 19x8ft 

5% x 19 x 12V? 

5% x 19 x 12ft 

7 x 19 x 127b 



Shipping 

Wt [lbs] 

16 

36 
50 
60 

16 

38 
50 
GO 



MODEL 

RS3A 

RS-4A 

RS-5A 

RS^7A 

RS-7B 

RS-10A 

RS-12A 

RS-12B 

RS-20A 

RS-35A 

RS-50A 



Colors 
Gray Black 






* 
■ 

■ 



Contimiis 

Duly (Alps) 

2.5 

3 

4 

5 

S 
7.5 

9 

9 

16 
25 
37 



ICS" 

[Ai M | 
3 
4 
5 

7 
7 
10 
12 
12 
20 
35 
50 



Size I IN] 

HxWxD 

3 X VA X 5& 

3% X 6ft X 9 

3ft X 6ft X 7ft 

m x 6ft x 9 

4 X 7ft X Wk 

4 X 7ft X 10¥4 
4ft X B X 9 

4 X 7ft X 1034 
5 X 9 X 10ft 
5 x 11 x 11 

Gx 13 3 4 x 11 



Sbipffii 

W1 fill.) 

4 

5 

7 

9 
10 
11 
13 
13 
16 
27 
46 



RS-M SERIES 




MODEL RS-35M 



MODEL 

Switchabte vott and Amp nwter 

RS-12M 

Separate voft and Amp meters 

RS-20M 

RS-35M 

RS-50M 



Ciiliiiiu 
Dilf |A«s*J 

9 

16 
25 

37 



ics- 

(A"MJ 
12 



35 
SO 



Size (IN) 

H x W x D 

4ft X 8 x 9 

5x9 X 10ft 

5x If x11 

6 X 13* x 11 



Shipping 
Wl. (lit.) 

13 

IS 

27 
46 



VS-M AND VRM-M SERIES 



Separate Volt and Amp Meters • Output Voltage adjustable from 2-15 volts * Current limit adjustable from 1.5 amps 




to Full Load 

MODEL 

VS-12H 
VS-20M 
VS-35M 
VS-50M 



Ctifiiitit 

lltf fAlpf] 

@13 + 8VDC @10VDC 

9 5 

16 9 

25 15 

37 22 



MODEL VS-35M 



• Variable rack mount power supplies 
VRM-35M 25 15 

VRM-50M 37 22 



@5VDC 

2 

4 

7 

10 



7 
10 



ICS* 

(Asps) 

@13.8V 
12 
20 
35 

50 



35 
50 



(li) 

IxWxl 

4ft X 8 X 9 

5 X 9 X 10ft 

5 X 11 X 11 

6X1334X 11 



5% X 19 X 12ft 
5ft X 19 X 12ft 



Siippiig 
WL (lit.) 

13 



40 



38 
50 




Built in speaker 

MOQEL 

RS-7S 
RS-tOS 
RS-12S 
RS-20S 



Colors 
Gray Black 



* 
# 



Oily (Anps) 
5 

7.5 
9 
16 



ICS" 

Anpi 

7 

10 
12 
20 



Size (IN) 

H x W x D 

4 X 7ft x 10* 

4 X 7ft X 10* 

4ft x 8 X 9 

5 X 9 X 10ft 



Shipping 
WL (IhlJ 

10 

12 

13 

16 



MODEL RS-12S 



* ICS— Intermittent Communication Service (5D% Duty Cyde 5min. on 5 min. off) 



CIRCLE 16 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Figure 2. PC board foil pattern. 




,-TrI~ I- a . 



IC2 
4B13 



|R 

2 



3 



Kl 

RCLflY 



COM 







Parts List 


, QTY 


Part Number 


Description 


1 


RCA SK1 1 A/5020 A 


1 1 volt 0.5 watt zener diode 


t 


RCA SK14A/5023A 


14 voH 0.5 watt zener diode 




RS 276-2401 


4001 CMOS quad two-input NOR gate 




RS 276-241 3 


40 1 3 dual-type D f tip-flop 




RS 276-2066 


NPN Darlington transistor 




RS 271-021 


680 ohm 0.5 watt resistor 




RS 271-024 


1200 ohm 0-5 watt resistor 




RS 271-026 


3000 ohm 0.5 watt resistor 




RS 276-1 102 


1N4003 rectifier 




RS 275-624 


SPST switch 




RS 275-248 


5A 1 25V relay 1 2 VDC coil 




RS 270-233 


Project box 




N/A 


3-wire extension cord 


A blank PC board is available for $3 + $1 .50 shipping from FAR Circuits, 


18N640 Reld Court. Dundee IL 601 18. 



NC 



NO 



Figure 3. Paris placement. 

the transistor turns off. Without this diode the 
transistor has a short life! 

Construction 

I found that a perfboard and point-to-point 
wiring was a good way to construct this cir- 
cuit. [Ed. note; An etched and drilled PC 
board is also available. / A hacksaw and a file 



trimmed my perfboard scrap to fit in- 
side the metal box easily. I drilled 
holes in the box and the perfboard for 
mounting standoffs before beginning 
construction. 

Try to arrange the components on 
the perfboard neatly, I find I make 
fewer mistakes this way, and it looks better, 
too. I passed the 12 volt power cord and the 
extension cord (both in and out) of the box 
using plastic crimp-style strain reliefs. 

Tie all the inputs of all unused gates in both 
IC1 and IC2 to ground. For 1C1 (the 4001 
CMOS NOR gate), this would be the six 
unused inputs. For IC2 (the 4013 CMOS 




CAN YOU SPOT THE ANTENNA? 



Neither can your neighbors. At last 
a solution to antenna restrictions. 
The Ventenna™ slips over your ex- 
isting vent pipe in less than 10 min- 
utes, and with 2.6 dBi gain, your 
signal really gets out. The Venten- 
na is virtually invisible. And, there's 
no more rugged antenna made. 

Call today to order your 2m, 220, 
440 or scanner version of the Ven- 
tenna. 

Only $49.95. 






P.O. Box 445, Rocklin, CA 95677 
Orders: 1-800-551 -51 56 




Forbes 
Group 




■"WiB'COiw 



Please add $4.00 for shipping ajid handling. Dealer inquiries invited. 



28 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



CtRCt£ 22t OH READCR SfUVICt CARD 



flip-flop) this would be the D T S, C and R 

inputs, If these inputs arc left floating (not 
connected to ground), the two CMOS inte- 
grated circuits are very vulnerable to damage 
from static. 

Mount the relay away from the other com- 
ponents on the board. Cut the extension cord 
in the middle, and pass the two ends through 
holes in the box. Connect the neutral and 
ground wires back together with either wire 
nuts or a careful solder job and insulating 
tape. This is 120 VAC at significant amper- 
age you have available and it will do damage 
if you make a mistake* so be careful! Solder 
the hot wire to the Normally Open terminals 
or the relay, The same precaution applies 
here, so be careful! Secure the wires to the 
circuit board near where they arc soldered to 
the relay so accidental movement doesn't 
twist them loose. 

When wiring the switch in the circuit, you 
can add an LED and a series resistor (1000 
ohms) if you want a power indicator. 

When you place the perfboard in the box, 
examine the area between the bottom of the 
circuit board and the box for any possible 
shorts, I neglected to do this and was reward- 
ed by an impressive display of sparks! 

If you have problems with RF1 from your 
transmitters, ground the metal case. Add a 
toroid coil in series with both the positive and 
negative DC power leads. Bypass this coil to 
ground with a ceramic capacitor (0.01 \xF)> 
An electrolytic across the DC input will also 
help. Additional bypassing may be needed on 
the extension cord. Ceramic capacitors (0.0) 
\i¥) will help here, too, 

My battery watchdog has worked quite 
well, and I don't worry about a dead battery 
or scrambling to plug the battery charger in 
during a session as net control. 

I want you to be aware that a charging 
lead- acid battery produces a sufficient 
amount of hydrogen to cause a very damag- 
ing explosion. My battery is not in the shack, 
but under my home, vented to the outside* 
Two A WG 00 cables bring DC into my shack 
with very little voltage drop (0.5 volt mea- 
sured at 40 amps). 

Now when the power goes off in the middle 
of the sweepstakes or during a rare DX con- 
tact, you can just smile and keep hamming! 



146 / 220 / 440 MHz 




> jj.;j 



3.5" 




. . . 



I- 



3.5" 



I 



Amazing new high performance antenna only 
.003" thick virtually disappears on your car 
window. Used for undercover surveillance by 
Jaw enforcement agencies — now available to 
the general public lor the first time! 



BliiaiDILiS (H^pl WWBBELK/m 






VIDEO LD. BOARD 






«t^^ins]dc:pfife;wi 



li«in« 



;; s^ratchc&L no suction cup Kinudgifcft, 'no clips, 

* hrtds pfcbterras wkli car -wisiiss and garajys doors. 
■■*$(<$ ^dy^Hisirig your rig to poi£OEF<il thieves. 

* More cflfci fesit than through- glai>y anlettius- 

* Wide bandwidth; SWR less chati J .5: Lover (he entire hand. 
* ,S?]f -adlieiisvc dix;iJ sejeks to any glas£,$Ltff$??* " 

- Muifipol^riziLtiLin retinues QSEt iii urban itfeas.:, 

•MadcirilheUSA^' 

. .. . 

■* Hi^Fi pcifonrinncc copper scrpcnlJMc rjontow. array, etched 

•jao.lycnide with anfi-cofmsive graphite colored coating. 
« Printed: This vehicle protected by alarm, same pjri&l 
Specify Alarm dix-al-wherr order ing. 

50 Watt □ 146 MHz no Watt 



_„ 95 D 220 MHz 



95 




VI DA 



30 da y money back guarantee, 
1 year manufacturer warranty, 



UPS shipping in US included. Foreign orders +$10 



j-Com Box 194 T Ben Lomond CA 95005 
(408)335-9120 FAX 335-9121 



CIRCLE 175 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




•Custom Graphics with your Call Sign 

•4 Screens (2 Hi-res/2 color bar) 

■12 VDC Operation 

•Instant Video ID 

•Video Relay for switching in Live 

Camera Video 
■Built-in Automatic Sequencer-Timer 

(steps through all four screens) 

VDG-1 with pre-programmed calls: 

$99 

Caff or write for catalog of available graphics 

ELKTRONICS 

12536 T,R, 77 ■ Findlay, OH 45840 
(419)422-8206 



wmsK. 




EJIBLVH-WB9CLK 




ELKTRONICS 

1253G T.a. 77 
Findlag. OH 15B10 

OlH) 422-0200 



KA8HLV 

1m* |n "bJww* 





CIRCLE 8 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



SHORTY ALL-BANDER 



M» 



^JW- 



THE PERFECT MATCH FOfl 
ANTENNA TUNERS WIT 
A BALANCED OUTPUT 



"ft? 
H ty 



*?HB> 



ONLY 70 FOOT 
LONG OVERALL 



- Completely l&ct&fy assembled rea<] ¥ !o us ^ 

* Small, hghtwS^hl. wOflll"*flflyOflf. sealed s-horte*ie^6 wilh slainhess steel 
eyelets 

* Heavy 14 (7/22) gaLKjft Slrafldfrd CORfler sntenna wire 10 Survive ino*0 
severe storms 

* Cenler Ted wilfa 1 00 Feel O* low loss 4&0 onm balanced trEHisriisEiOfi line 

* Includes center insulator with an uyd hook f 5r center supparl 

* Includes CUBttffl molded msulatars rfWHtfed Of lop fairly material wlih 
hrfjti diel*ClfiC Qualities arid excell-enl wea1lieratji(i1y 

* Complete installation instructions included 

* Overall lengJh 70 feel . less when creeled as an inverted vee or sloptf 

* Handtes 2 Hw PEP & covers 160 Irir&uon 10 melers 

* May be tnmmetf 10 til small city lots 

Only $39.95 ppd 

me ALL -BANDER DIP0LE. ail-band doublet type antenna is fully assembl- 
ed overall langih 135 1eei wim UK) Feel *$Q OHM leadline 

Only $29.95 ppd 

G5RV ANTENNA 




The GSRV MULTIBANDEfl antflrina sS dm excellent all band (3 5-30 
MH;j "0? foot diflOle On 1 fl MHz trie anlenna may ba used ai a Mar- 
coni typ* amenna when used wim a lunor and a good earm ground. The 
proper combination of a 102 1aol Flat-top anrl 31 Feel m 30O ohm KW 
LwmJwad Irahimsssion Mr'iu auhiev&s resonanto on an ins amateui oands 
from SO irifpggh 10 meters whh only one antenna There is no tees in 
I raps and cons Ttvo jmoedanc* piestmi at me und of me aoo onnv «vv 
twiniead transmission hue >s aboul 50-60 ohms, a. good maich 10 the 70 
Feet o\ FIGQX mini loam Coax. II corned ClMlplet&ly isiSOmblCd ttiStJOy lot 
mstaJfauon, tiandles £ KW PEP BnfJ may he used *n a horijontaJ or in- 
verted "V conhyuratiun 

MODEL BANDS LENGTH 

G5RV-MB B0-10 t02' 

(mooei iNuslratedi 
G5HV 50-10 103" 

fna jflmr or cabFe. wilh 31 ' bal 
G5RV JR. 40MO Si" 

(tip sPnir or cabte, wilh 2Q' bat 



PRICE 

$49. 95 ppd 

$34.95 PPD 

Feedtine) 

$29, &5 ppd 

I^H.Mll'f-.'l 



AT YOUN DEALER, FF NOT ORDER DJHECT 



VGE 



VAN GORDEN ENGINEERING 

BOX 21305 S EUCLID, OHIO 4*121 

PHONE (216) 48^-6590 FAX (2T6) 491 0329 




LM€W 



BULLETIN 

CALL US 
NOW" 



; 'CJ 



Your Ham Dollar Goes 

Further At 

call ok write for special quote 



When it comes to 

FAST DELIVERY HONEST DEALING ana 

PROMPT .'DEPENDAfiLE S-E-R-V-l-C-E back-up 



We ctont just advertise it — WE GIVE IT 1 




we'£f &&z? 



In 1937, Stan Burghardt (W0IT), because of his intense interest in 
amateur radio, began selling and servicing amateur radio equipment 
in conjunction with his radio parts business We stand proud of this 
long-lasting tradition of Honest Dealing, Quality Products and 
Dependable SERVICE"! 

Above all, we fully intend to carry on this proud tradition with even 
more new product lines plus the same "fair" treatment you've come 
to rely on. Our reconditioned equipment is of the finest quality with 30, 
60 and even 90-day parts and labor warranties on selected pieces. 
And always remember: 

— WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL — 



pwt\ 



SELECTION 



S-E-RVI-C-E 



SATISFACTION! 



"AMERICA'S MOST RELIABLE AMATEUR RADIO DEALER" 

SELL-TRADE 

New & Reconditioned 

Ham Equipment 

Call or W rile Us Today For a Quote! 
You']] Find Us lo be Courteous, Knowledgeable 

and Honest 

phone (605)886-7314 
fax (605) 886-3444 



AEA 
Alinco 
Ameritron 
Amphenol 

Ampire 
Antenna 

Specialists 

Astro n 



B&W 

Belden 

Bencher 

Bird 

Butternut 

Centurion 

CES 

Cushcraft 



Daiwa 

Hustler 

Kantronics 

Kenwood 

Lars en 

MFJ 

Mirage/KLM 

Mosley 



Patomar 

Radio Callbook 
Ritron 
Rohn 
Telex/Hygain 

Ten-Tec 

UnadiUa/Reyco 

Yaesu 



STORE HOURS: 

M P.*. (CSTi 
MONDAY thru HtlDAf 

&MM SATURDAYS 
into *-! P.HMCET} 

CLOSED 
5UNDATS, HOLIDAYS 




MAIL *ND 

TELEPHONE 

ORDERS 

, . Th»r'r» our 

byiin*SJ l I 



iMealerCord) 


VISA' 



Write today for our latest Bulletin /Used Equipment List. 



182 N, Maple 

P.O. Box 73 

Watertown, SD 57201 




Get the most of HF Mobiling 

Yaesu FT-747GX 
SPECIAL OFFER! 

CALL TODAY 
FOR SPECIAL QUOTE 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May. 1992 29 



Number 10 on your Feedback card 



Control Your 
Station by Computer 

Hardware and software Interfaces for Kenwood rigs 



by F. Barry McWilliams WK2S 



Computers are finding their place in ham 
radio shacks in ever-increasing fre- 
quency. They are being used to replace paper 
logs for both general operation and, especial- 
ly, for contest operation, They are being used 
as word processors to produce club newslet- 
ters. They are being used for learning CW, 
and there are programs available that tutor 
you in the theory and regulations for different 
grades of ham licenses. They are being used 
for all sorts of complex calculations, such as 
Minimum Usable Frequency (MUF), great 
circle beam headings and distance. Smith 
charts, antenna patterns and circuit analysis. 
The next step is the use of the computer for 
actually controlling your station. 

Though often unseen by their users, com- 
puter control is commonplace in many VHF 
repeater installations. A microcomputer, not 
unlike the one in your desktop computer, 
controls the repeater's transmit, receive and 
identification functions. However, unlike the 
desktop computer, the repeater control com- 
puter runs only one program, the program 
that controls the repeater. 

This article examines cne hardware and 
software interfaces that make it possible to 
control your HF station with your IBM-com- 
patible desktop computer. The major ham 
radio manufacturers each offer computer 
control for some of their HF and VHF trans* 
ceivers. Here weTl look at the hardware and 
software interface provided by Kenwood for 
computer control of the following models: 

• TS- 140S 
•TS^40S 

• TS-940S 

• TS-950S 
•TS-711S 
•TS-811S 
•R5000 

First, we will examine the hardware inter- 
face between the computer and the radio. 
Then we will discuss how a computer pro- 
gram can control the operation of the radio by 
taking a look at some sample segments of 
BASIC code. 

Hardware Interface 

The hardware interface between the radio 
and your computer is a straightforward RS- 
232C serial interface, not unlike your com- 

30 73 Amateur Radio Today May. 1992 




Photo A. Easy computer control of your rig is 
possible with this simple interface. 



TS-*40S 




tF-«ae 




IBM PC 




I 




m * 


R5-232 
SERIAL 
PORT 






LEVfL 
CONVERTER 




IF-lOB 





















Figure i. TS~940S~to-PC configuration. 



TO t$M PC 



a 

6 



U1 

i flay 



C^^+tH- 



U2 
I46B 



I ?4Q4 



Kl^TT^ 



fh 



\ i 



*12V 



5V 



0S2i 
PLUG 






TT 



*5V 



i 



TO 
rs-940 



P2 



U3 

"■■. - 



•sv 



220pF 



yi 

■ 489 



u 



1 



6 PIN Q4N 
PLUG 



I 



Figure 2. TTURS-232 level converter. Inte- 
grated circuits; U! MCI } 489 RS232 quad line 
receiver (Radio Shack 276-2521); V2 
MCI 488 RS2S2 quad line driver (Radio 
Shack 276-2520); U3 7404 hex inverter (Ra- 
dio Shack 276-18021 Miscellaneous; PI - 
25-pin female type D plug (Radio Shack 276- 
1548); P2 - 6-pin DIN plug (Radio Shack 
274-0201 



puter's interface to a telephone modem or a 
packet TNC. The Kenwood transceivers re- 
quire an interface kit that is installed in the 
transceiver, and a level converter unit, IF- 
232C, that comes as a separate unit with 
cables that connect to your computer and to 
your radio, Figure 1 shows the hardware 
configuration for the TS-940S, 

The IF-10B computer interface kit is in- 
stalled in the TS 940S, and the output of the 
computer interface is available at the ACCl 
accessory connector on the rear pane! of the 
TS-940S. The signals at the ACC I connector 
are TTL logic levels, and +5 volts. The 
IF-232C level convener converts the TTL 
signals to RS-232 standard levels required for 
use with the serial IO ports on IBM and com- 
patible PCs. 

There are different interface kits for vari- 
ous models of the Kenwood radios. You 
should check with a Kenwood dealer to be 
sure you have the interface kit that matches 
your particular radio. The IF-232C level con- 
verter is the same for all of the Kenwood 
radios. You can build your own IF-232C and 
save a bit of money over the Kenwood acces- 
sory. 

A home-brew converter is shown in Figure 
2. It consists of only three integrated circuits: 
a TTL inverter (7404), a TTL-to-RS-232 lev- 
el convener (1488) and a RS-232-to-TTL 
converter (1489). 1 built this circuit on a 
Radio Shack perf board using sockets for the 
ICs and small gauge (wire wrap) wire for 
connections. 

The power supply requirements are mini- 
mal: 

* +5 volts is required for the 7404 TTL logic 
IC and the converter chips. 

* + 9 to + 1 2 volts can be used for the positive 
RS-232 level, 

* —5 to — 12 volts can be used for the nega- 
tive RS-232 level. 

The positive and negative RS-232 levels do 
not need to match one another. I used a Cole- 
co game power pack that supplied 4-5, +12 
and -5 volts. 

Software Interface 

The PC communicates with the radio by 
means of commands sent to the radio as a 
string of characters. For example, if the com- 




mtmm 9 



HF Equipment Regular SALE 

IC-781 Xcvr/ps/tuner/scope-Sjtfecya/ $6395.00 4999 




IC-7B5 Xcvr/ps/keyer/tuner • SpecM..28QH00 2299 




IC-751A 9-band xcvrAl-30 MWi rx ... $1440. 

PS-35 Internal power supply. 228 

FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 59 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 115, 

FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 115 

FL-7D 2.8 kHz wide SSB filter 59 

IC-735 HFxcvr/SWrcvr/mic 1064 

PS-55 External power supply .....228 

AT-150 Automatic antenna tuner 446, 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter 69 

EX-243 Electronic keyer unit 64 

UT-30 Tone encoder.. 18 



1199 
20995 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 899 95 
00 209 95 
67 399 95 

00 
67 
67 




IC-725 HFxcvr/SWrcvr/mic, $893.00 749 95 

AH-3 Automatic antenna tuner 488.33 449* 5 

JC-726 10-bandxcvrw/6m 1283.00 1089 

HF Accessories: Regular SALE 

IC-2KL HF solid state amp w/ps $2079.00 1719 

IC-4KL HF 1 kw amp w/ps * Special.. 7275,00 5799 

EX-627 Automatic antenna selector 314.67 279 a5 

PS-15 20A external power supply ........ 183.00 1 69 9 - 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6 pin plug 363.00 329 95 

SP-3 External speaker 65.00 

SP-7 Small external speaker. 52.00 

CR-64 High stab. ref. xtal; 751A, etc 79.00 

SM-fi Desk microphone. 47.93 

SM-fl Desk mic; two cables, scan „„ 89.00 

AT-500 500w 9 band auto ant tuner 589.00 539 95 

AH-2 8-band tuner w/mount& whip,.. 780,00 B89 95 

Accessories for IC-781/765/765/72S/725 • CALL j 





• Large Stocks 
+ Fast Service 

• Top Trades 





VHF/UHF Base Transceivers Regular SALE 
IC-2T5H lOOw 2 rtl FM/SSB/CW 1455.00 1219 

IC-475H lOOw 440 FM/SSB/CW 1665.00 1399 

1C-575A 25w6/10mxcvr/ps .. 1455,00 1199 

IC-575H 25wlQ0w6/10mxcvr„ .1564.00 1329 

IC-1275A lOw L2GHz FM/SSB/CW 1923.00 1599 

J- >. &■ ~ ^v Kl fc. Sfc ^ 

.. . .■:■ .p.s Sftfflftflfr 

: , . 
.• . ¥■>;•■ 

<«W v> " " : 

^ k S. .;:.::■?. ■ ;.■•'■. 

ScB 

VHF/UHF FM Transceivers Regular SALE 

IG-229A 25w2mFM/TTPmic . $392.00 329 95 

IC-229H 50w2mFM/TTPmic ; .425.00 359 95 

IC-38A 25w220MHzFMxetf* -.409,00 349 M 

IC-449A 35w440FMxcvr/TTP 473.00 399* 5 

IC-1201 lOw 1.2GHz FM/SSB/CW 831.00 719 to 

Dual band FM Transceivers Regular SALE 

IC-2410A 25w 2m/440 FM/TTP mic $889.00 749* 

IC-2410H 45w2m/35w 440 FM/TTP mic 932.00 789* 5 

IC-3220A 25w2m/«0 FM/TTP mic 685.00 579** 

IC-3220H 45w 2m/ 35w 440 FM/TTP mic 727.00 599 95 

IC-2500A 35w 440/10w L2GHz FM „.„..1039.00 8B9 95 

Multi-band FM Transceiver Regular SALE 
IC-901 50w2m/35w440WIHzFMxcvr $1039.00 8B9 95 

UX-R91A Broadband receiver unit 405,00 359 a5 

UX-19A lOw 10m unit 311.00 279 9S 

UX-59A 10w6munit 363.00 329 95 

UX-S92A 2m SSB/CW module 623.00 549 95 

UX-39A 25w 220MHz unit 363.00 329 95 

UX-1 29A lOw 1.2GHz unit....... ....571.00 509 95 

UX-49A 440MHz module lor IC-900 363.00 31 9 95 

IC-97QA 25w2m/430MHzxcvr/ps 2409.00 1999 

IC-970H 45w2m/430 MHz transceiver, 2567.00 2159 

UX-R96 50-905 MHz receive unit 405.00 349 95 

UX-97 1.2GHz band unit 1039.00 B69 95 

VHF/UHF Mobile Antenna Regular SALE 

AH-32 2m/440 Dual Band mobile ant $39.33 

Larsen P0-K Roof mount 23.00 

Larsen PO-MM Magnetic mount „,„ 28,75 

VHF/UHF Repeaters Regular SALE 

RP-1520 2m 25w repeater. $2319.00 1949 

RP 2210 220MHz 25* repeater,.. ..1715.00 1449 

RP-4020 440MHz 25w repeater. ......... 2392 00 1999 

RP-4Q2Q/50W 440MHz 50 w repeater... .2599.00 2189 

RP-1220 1,2GHz lOw repeater 2703 00 2269 

We stock the entire ICOM line P but due to space 
limitations some items are not listed in this ad, 



HandheJds Regular SALE 

IC-2AT 1.5w2mHT/TTP $247.00 209 95 

IC-02AT/Higti Power 2m .... 333.00 289® 
IC-03AT 2.5w220HT/TTP....319.00 269 35 

IC-2SA 2m HT 345,00 289 as 

IC-2SAT 2m/nP 372.00 319* 

IC-2SRA 2m/25-905MHz a 600.00 509 as 
IC-24AT 2m/440MHzmP... 492 00 419" 
IC-3SAT 220MHz HT/TTP..,., 351.00 299 ss 

IC-4SAT 440MHz HT/HP 351.00 299 95 

JC-4SRA 440MHZ/25-905 ra 600.00 509 s5 

IC-2GAT 2fnHT/n? ..372.00 319 s5 

IC-4GAT 440MHZ/TTP 372.00 319 s5 

IC-12GAT 1.2GHz/nP 381.00 329 s5 

^^^ IC-W2A 2m/440 KT 627.00 529 s5 

Aircraft band handheJds RegufarSMl 

A-2 5W PEP synth aircraft HT 525.00 479" 

A-20 aircraft HTvy/VOR • Closeout... 625.00 499 s5 
A-21 Navicom Plus Aircraft HT 660.00 549" 

For into/prices 011 HT accessories • CALL 
~ R-1 

h 
I 





Shortwave Receivers 

R-1 100kHz-1.3GHzAM/FM handheld 

H-7TA 100kHz-30MHzrcvr .. ... 

RC-11 Infrared remote controller... 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW lifter 

FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter {1st IF)..... 
FL-44A SSB filter {2nd IF) 



S ■ 1 » »■ + ■ 



EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

CR-64 High stabiity oscillator rial. 
R-72 30kHz-30MHz SW receiver 



Regular 
$533.00 

1019,00 
...-71.00 
.... 69.00 
.... 59,00 
.. 178.00 
... 49.00 
... 59.00 
.... 79.00 
.972,00 



SALE 

469" 

869" 



169 ss 



B29 95 




Accessories for 

R-l/R-72/B-lOO/R-SBOO 

CALL 



R-1 00 100kHz-1.856GHzAM/FM r 12vdc 707.00 599 95 

R-7000 25MHz-2GHz receiver .....1221.00 1029 

RC-12 Infrared remote controller 71.00 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 59.00 

TV-R7000 ATV unit... 139.00 134 35 

SP-3 External speaker 65.00 

CK-70 (EX-299) 12V DC option 13.00 

MB-12 Mobile mount 26.00 

R-9000 100kHz-2GHz all mode rec... $5677,00 4699 

Companion Promotion . . tor a limited 
time, all ICOM receivers will include a 
Discount Coupon which can be redeemed 
toward the purchase of a "companion" 
ICOM R-1 from AES® for only ■ $349°° 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 fax: (41 4) 358-3337 

AMATEUR ELECTRONIC SUPPLY 

5710 W. Good Hope Road; Milwaukee, Wl 53223 • Phone (414) 358-0333 



® 

Inc. 



AES BRANCH STORES 



*i?mt 



Associate Store 
— ---■ CHICAGO, lllmots60G3D 

WICKLIFFE, Ohio 44092 ORLANDO, Fla. 32303 CLEARWATER, Fia. 34625 LAS VEGAS, Nev. 891 06 ERrCKSON COMMUNICATIONS 
29940 Euclid Avenue 621 Commonwealth Ave. 1898 Drew Street 1D72 N. Rancho Drive 5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (21 6)585-7388 Pftone (407) 894-3238 Phone (813) 461-4267 Phone (702) 647-3114 Phone (312)631-5181 

1-800-321-3594 1-800-327-1917 No Toll Free Line 1-800-634-6227 1-800-621-5802 



puter sends the following string 
to the radio; FAOOQ 14300000; 
then the frequency of VFO A is 
set to 14.300 MHz. Some com- 
mands elicit a response from the 
radio to the PC For example: 
IF; requests the radio to send a 
report of its current settings to 
the PC, The radio responds 
with a string of data that in- 
cludes the current frequency, 
RIT and XIT frequency, the op- 
erating mode (USB, LSB,CW) t and so forth. 
Because the BASIC programming lan- 
guage is practically the lingua franca of per- 
sonal computer languages, I will use some 
simple fragments of BASIC code to illustrate 
how you can control your radio from your 
computer. At the end of this article, we will 
put all the fragments together to form a rudi- 
mentary program that allows you to send 
control commands to your radio and receive 
status returned from the radio. 

PC-Radio Communications 

The first order of business is to get the PC 





Interface Kit 


Level Converter 


TS-940S 


IF-10B 


IF-232C 


TS-950S 


built-in 


built-in 


TS-440S, TS-680S, R-5000 


IC-10 


IF-232C 


TS-140S 


IF-10C 


IF-232C 


TS-711A.TS-811A 


IF-10A 


IF-232C 


TS*7 1 1 A 


IF-10A 


IF-232C 


TS-790A 


(none) built-in 


IF-232C 



Table 1. Interface kit and level converter matches for Kenwood radios 



and the radio talking to one anoihcr. The 
radio interface always communicates at a par- 
ticular speed and data format; the Kenwood 
interface is set to 4800 baud and 8 data bits, 
The BASIC OPEN statement initialises the 
PC for serial communication as shown be- 
low: 

610 OPEN J 'COM2:48G0,N,8' J AS #1 r OPEN COM 

port 2 
520 COM(2) ON 

These statements initialize PC communica- 
tions port 2. To initialize port 1, change the 
number, 2, in each of the above statements to 1 . 



Handling Asynchronous 
Input From the Radio 

The Kenwood radios commu- 
nicate with the PC by sending a 
series of characters to the PC , A 
complete string of characters is 
ended with a semi-colon (;). 
The PC program must be able to 
process each character as it ar- 
rives from the radio and store 
the characters until a semi- 
colon comes along, 

The BASIC ON statement enables us to 
write code that is executed each time a char- 
acter comes along. The ON statement illus- 
trated below routes control to a subroutine at 
statement 5000. The subroutine: 

* saves the character from the radio, 

* looks for a semi-colon mean- 
ing the end of input, 

* sets the variable L to 1 when a semi-colon is 
found* 

1 00 ON COM{2) GOSUB 5000 ' setup for COM port 2 
Interrupts 



Command 



ID: 



FAggmmmkkkhhh ; 



Returns id of radio, 

IE003; for TS940 

I DO 04; for TS440 

ID005; for E5000 

Set VFO A frequency. Where gg = gigahertz, 
maim - megahertz., kkk «■ kilo-hertz and 
hhh = hertz, AIL the values must be specif ied> 
so to set the VFO A to 7.335 Mflz, enter 
FBQG0Q73- 35000 j 



F3ggmnnokkkhhh; Set VFO B frequency, 



FA; 



FB; 



Read VFO A'^s frequency. 

You should see a response from the radio that 
looks much like the Set VFO A frequency command. 
The response will be of the fnrm, FAg&Tmimkkkhhh, 
and can be interpreted in the same manner as the 
SET VFO frequency command- 
Read VFO B's frequency. 

Read radio information. 

The response from the radio is 35 bytes long and 

of the form,. IFggrommkkkhhheeette5KH}iKrxbNNi.Mfcp--- 



ggrranmkkktibh 

^^- "••• C 1 W *3 1 11 ■ ■ ■ 

E 

K ."Ll™:; I . 

X, _ A, * .1 d .. ri . + _ 

■A *■■■-*■• + *■• + * 

b 

NN . 



H . 



display frequency, gg^mmm. kkkhhh MHz 
step frequency, ee,eee Hz 

plus(+) or minus(-0 RIT/XIT direction 
filT/KIT frequency, k.bhh KHz 
D if KIT is off, 1 if RIT is on 
if XIT is off, 1 if X3T is on 

memory bank number (TS-940) 
memory number 
if transmitter on, 
if transmitter off 
if LSH, 2 if USB 
if FM 
if FSK 



if CW t £ 

if AH, 6 

if VFO A 

if VFO B 

if memory 






if scan off, 1 if scan on 
if split off, 1 if split on 
blanks (net used) 



All; 



AI0; 

FNQ; 
FN1; 
FN2-, 

MCbmm; 

l)S; 
UP, 



Turn auto- information on. 

Whenever any radio function is changed 1 the IF 

information (see above) is sent to the computer. 

Turn auto- in formation off. 

Select VFO A 
Select VFO B 

Select mentory (VFO/HemJ 

Select memory bank b 3 channel mm 

Step VFO frequency or memory channel down One Step, 
Step VFO frequency or memory channel up one step. 



uKQ; 
LK1; 

MD1 j 

rtD3; 

MD6; 

RT0; 

RT1; 

XT0; 

XT1; 

RD; 

RU; 

RC; 

RX; 
TX; 

SCO; 
SCI; 
MS0; 
MSI; 
HD0; 
HD1; 

SPG; 
Sl'l; 

AT; 

LG; 
SH; 

SHw; 

SLvv; 

SLvv; 

VB; 

Vhvv; 

MR bNN; 



Frequency Lock off 
Frequency Lock on 



Select LSB 




Select USB 




Select CW 




Select FE1 




Select AM 




Select FSK 




RIT off 




RIT on 




XIT off 




XIT on 




Tune RIT/ XIT down 


10 Hz 


Tune RIT/XIT up 10 


Hz 


Clear RIT/XIT 




Receive ( transmit 


off) 


Transmit 




Frogram scan off 




Frogram scan on 




Memory scan off 




Memory scan on 




Scan hold off 




Scan hold on 




Split off 




Split on 





Antenna tuner 

etiablg remote control of slope tune and VST (TS-940) 

read Slope tune high 

set Slope tune high- vv is a value between 00 and 31 

read Slope tune low 

set Slope tune low. vv is a value between 00 and 31 

read VBT 

set VBT. vv is a value between 00 and 31 

Read memory. 

b is memory bank 

NN is memory channel 

This command returns the data in the selected 

memory in the form, MR bNNgg^niwnkkkhhhM ; 

W Is the mode (LSB, USB, etc) with the same 
values as H in the IF response, above. 



MM bNNggmmmkkktihhM- -; Write memory 

b is memory bank 

NN is memory channel 

ggmmmkkkhhh is the frequency 

M is the mode (LSB, USH , etc.) with the same 

values as M in cbe IF response, above. 



VK; 


Voice recall 


fit; 


DCL ID readout of call sign 


DS1; 


DCL on 


DS0; 


DCL off 


OS; 


Offset 


ST; 


Tone number step 



Table 2. Radio commands, The commands you can issue and the response you should expect back from the radio. 



32 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 







FREQUENCY COUNTERS 



III NEW BAR GRAPH SERIES 

ULTRA HIGH SENSITIVITY 



SUB-COMPACT PORTABLE INSTRUMENTS FOR THE 
COMMUNICATIONS PROFESSIONAL, HAM OR HOBBYIST 

Choose from 6 NEW MODELS 

WITH ADDED FEATURES & PERFORMANCE 



Our low power design yields 3 to 5 hours portable 
operation from the high capacity internal NI-CAD 
batteries. (Standard in all models). 

StarCab 1 " top quality US made aluminum cabinets 
are used with machine screw assembly. No cheap 
extruded aluminum or steel with self-tap screws. 

Convenient POCKET SIZE: 3.4" W, 3.8" H, 1"D. 
A 2 inch RF SIGNAL BAR GRAPH, ULTRA HIGH 
SENSITIVITY and operation to 3.5 GHZ, all 
available in the btahtek sub-compact models. 




These new models are the most 
sensitive counters yet. A bright LED BAR 
GRAPH functions as a signal strength 
indicator. Very useful for testing, 
adjusting, repairing or locating RF 
devices. These are simply the best 
portable RF counters available today! 



STANDARD FEATURES INCLUDE: 

• NI-CAD BATTERIES & 110VAC ADP/CHARGER 

• 1 PPM TCXO TIME BASE - FRONT PANEL ADJ 

• 3 GATE TIMES • HOLD SWITCH & INDICATOR 

• 9-12VDC AUTO- POLARITY POWER INPUT 

• StarCab" ALUMINUM CABINET 
COMPUTER AIDED CIRCUIT DESIGN 

• TOP QUALITY COMPONENTS 

• 100% ASSEMBLED IN THE USA 

• 1 YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY 




ORDER NOW I ultra high sensitivity 



SAVE UP TO 

$30 

CALL FOR DETAILS 



2 INCH BAR GRAPH 
$220 



1 MHZ - 3200 MHZ 

ULTRA HIGH SENSITIVITY 

2 INCH BAR GRAPH 

$265 




1 MHZ - 1300 MHZ 

QUALITY & ECONOMY 

(REPLACES JV1500A) 

$129 



1 MHZ -1500 MHZ 

ULTRA HIGH SENSITIVITY 

(REPLACES *1500HS) 

$169 



ACCESSORIES: 

#CC-90 BLACK VINYL ZIPPER CASE $12.00 

#TA-90 TELESCOPING BMC ANT 12.00 

#P-110 PROBE. 200 MHZ, 1X-10X 39.00 

#M207*C CABLE FOR MFJ-207/208 10.00 



ALL MODELS 

IN STOCK 

WE SHIP 

SAME DAY! 




ORDER FACTORY DIRECT 
Orders & Information 

305-561-2211 

Orders only 

800-638-8050 

FAX 305-561-9133 



TERMS: Shipping-harxBmg charge* for Rands add $4 + tax, 
US & Canada add 5% {$4 min - $10 max), others add 15% of 
totaJ. COD fee $4. VISA, MC or DISCOVER accepted. Prices 



398 NE 38th St. f *t. LBUOerdaJe, FL 33334 & specificalionH subjacl to chan9e without notice or obligation 




CIRCLE 247 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



5000 REM - process characters from COM Part 

5060 IF EOF(1) THEN RETURN 

5070C$=C$ + INPUT$(LOC(1) F #1) 

5080 IFINSTR(C$ 5 V) = 0THEN GOTO 5060 ' semi- 
colon means end -of -data 

5090 L=1:CI$=C$:C$=" ' Set L=1 and put the 
data in CIS 

51 1 RETURN ' for later use. 

Sending Commands to the Radio 

Control commands are sent to the radio by 
means of the BASIC PRINT statement. The 
following subroutine asks the user to enter a 
radio command and then, at line 8060, sends 
the command to the radio. Line 8060 takes 
the user input in the variable A$ and does a 



PRINT #1 to send the command to the serial 
communications port. The semi-colon (;) in 
line 8060 is needed to tell BASIC that a car- 
riage return character should not be sent to 
the radio at the end of the PRINT string. 

8000 REM - Enter a radio command 

8010 PRINT "Enter command = = = > H ; * prompt 

user for command 
8040 LINE INPUT A$ ■ input command from user 
8050 IF A$ = 4f THEN RETURN 
8060 PRINT #1 t A$; " send command to radio 
8910 RETURN 

We need a way to get to this code so the 
user can enter a command. This can be done 
by setting up a function key so that this rou- 



r 



Complete program 



setup for COM port 2 interrupts 
OPEN COM port 2 



setup F3 key 



Esc key pressed 
Data from radio 



STOP 

display 



100 ON COK(2) GQSUB 5000 

510 OPEN fl Q0m\ 4800, N, 8" AS #1 

520 C0M(2) ON 

650 ON KEY(3) GOSUB 3000 

652 KEY 3 t "Qmd " 

660 KEY(3) ON 

1000 REM - Main Program loop --- 

1020 IF TNKEYS=CHRS(27) THEN STOP 

1100 IF L=l THEN G0SUB 6000: L^0: GOTO 1020 

1190 GOTO 1020 

5000 REM •• process characters from C0MM Port 

5060 IF E0F(1) THEN RETURN 

5070 C$=C$+INPUT$(LGC(1),#1) 

5080 TF TNSTR(CSVY T )=Q THEN GOTO 5060 

5090 L=1:CI$=C$:C$= 1TTT 

5110 RETURN 

6000 REM - display data from Radio 

6010 PRINT CT$ % Display CI$ to see what we got, 

6020 IF MID${CT$,l,2)<> f, IF" THEN RETURN ' is this an IF response? 



semi-colon means end -of -data. 
Set L-l and put the data in CI$ 

for later use. 



6030 RIT=VAL(MID$(CI$,24,1)) 

6040 XIT=VALCMIDSCCIS,25 > 1)) 

6050 Me=VAL(MID$(CIS,27,2)) 

6060 XMIT=VALCMID$CCi$ ( 29,l)) 

6070 NODE^VAL(MID$CCI$,30 J 1)) 

60S0 FUNC=VAL(MID$(Ci;,31,i)) 

6090 SCAN=VAL(M1D$( CIS, 32,1)) 

6100 SPLIT=VAL(MID$(CI$ > 33 > 1)) 

6110 1W=VAL(MID5(CI5,6 ¥ 2)) 

6111 KHZ-VALCMIDSCCI^S^)) 

6112 HZ^VAUMDSCCIS,!!^)) 
6120 PRINT rr Freq: "; 

6132 PRINT MTD$<CIS,6,2); t \ ,t ; ' 

6133 PRINT MIDJCCIS.S^);"/'; T 

6134 PRINT MID$CCI$,11,3); 

6140 TF HIT THEN COLOR 7,4: PRINT 



sort out data in response 



MHz 
khz 
Hz 

KIT 



!! 



: COLOR 7,0 ELSE PRINT 



M 



6150 IF XIT THEN COLOR 7,4: PRINT M XIT ";:CGL0R 7,0 ELSE PRINT 

6160 IF £RIT+X1T)=0 THEN COLOR 7,0 ELSE COLOR 0,7 ' reverse if XTT 

6170 PRINT MIDS(CIS,19,1);" M ;MID${CIS ,20 , 1) ;" . ";MIDS(CI^ 21, 2) ; 

6180 COLOR 7,0 



tt 



n 



or 



RIT 



ii 



ii 



6300 

6310 
6320 
6330 
6340 
6350 
8000 
8010 
3040 
8050 
8060 
8910 



"FM ' 

"AM ' 
"FSK 1 

"VF0 

r, vro 
ii 



620O PRINT Mode 
6210 IF M0DE=I THEN PRINT "LSB* 
6220 IF M0DE=2 THEN PRINT "USB 1 
6230 IF M0DE=3 THEN PRINT 
6240 IF M0DE=4 THEN PRINT 
6250 [f MQS)K=5 THEN PRINT 
6260 IF f101)&=6 THEN PRINT 
PRINT ,T Function: ,T ; 
IF FUNC=0 THEN PRINT 
IF FL'NC=1 THEN PRINT 
IF FUNC=2 THEN PRINT 
PRINT 
RETURN 

REM - Enter a radio command 
PRINT "Enter command => " 
LINE INPUT A$ 
IF A$="" THEN RETURN 
PRINT #1»A5; 
RETURN 



A 
B 



ii 



ii 



ii 



Memory ";: PRINT MC 



prompt user for command 
input command from user 

send command to radio 



The complete interface and control program* 
34 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



tine is called whenever the function key is 
pressed. 

650 ON KEY{3) GOSUB 8000 s setup F3 key 

652KEY3 r "Cmcr 

660 KEY{3) ON 

Main Program 

The main program will spend all of its time 
simply waiting for input from the radio or the 
user. 

1000 REM - Main Program loop 

1020 IF INKEY$=CHR$(27) THEN STOP ' Esc key 

pressed ... STOP 
1100 IF L=1 THEN GOSUB 6000:L=0: GOTO 1020 

' Data from radio ... display 
1190 GOTO 1020 

Line 1020 uses the BASIC INKEY func- 
tion and tests to see if the user has pressed the 
Escape key . If so, the program will stop. 

Line i 100 tests the variable L which is set 
in the radio input subroutine when a semi- 
colon is found (see line 5090, above). L=l 
means that a complete line has been received 
from the radio. The main program calls the 
routine at line 6000 to display the data re- 
ceived from the radio. 

Line 1 190 routes control back to be top of 
the main program loop. 

Display of Data from the Radio 

For our simple program, the subroutine to 
display data received from the radio will just 
print the data saved in CI$. 

6000 REM - display data from Radio 

6010 PRINT Cl$ j Display CIS to see what we got. 

6350 RETURN 

Or* you can use the following code that illus- 
trates how you might extract the data returned 
from the IF; command. 

6000 REM - display data from Radio 

6010 PRI NT 01$ ' Display Ci$ to see what we got 

6020 IF MID$(Cl$ p 1 p 2}> "IF* THEN RETURN ' istftis 

an IF response? 
6030 RIT=VAL(M1D$(Cl$ h 24 t 1)) ■ sort out data in 

response 

604oxit^val(mid$(Ci$ j 25 ] i)) 

6050 MC=VAL(MlD$(Ci$ T 27,2)) 
6060 XMIT = VAL(M i D$(Ci$,29 t 1 )) 
6070 MODE=VAL(MID$(CI$,30,1» 
6080 FUNC = VAL(MID${CI&31 S 1)) 
6090 SCAN * VAL(MlO$(a$ h 32.1 )) 
6100 SPLIT=VAL(MID$(C1$ P 33 r 1)) 

61 10 MHZ=VAL(MtD$(C!$ r 6 p 2» 

6111 KHZ=VAL(MID$(CI$.8.3)) 

61 12 HZ^VALtMIDSpfrt 1 ,3)) 
6120 PRINT " Freq: % 

6132 PRINT MID$(Gl$ t 6 K 2);' r /; ' MHz 

6133 PRINT MID$(CI$,8 P 3); V; ' kHz 
eWPRINTMIDSfClS.II^; 'Hz 

6140 JF RIT THEN COLOR 7 P 4:PRINT * RIT 

";:COLOR7 r ELSE PRINT * "; 
6150 IF XIT THEN COLOR 7,4:PRINT " XIT 

*; "COLOR 7 P ELSE PRINT " "; 
61 60 IF (RIT +XH>0 THEN COLOR 7.0 ELSE 

COLOR 0,7 r reverse if XIT or RIT 
6170 PRINT M]D$(Ct$,19,1); ffl 

";MID$(C[$ T 20,1);V';MID$(C1$ T 21,2); 
6180 COLOR 7,0 




yjUNCO 



OJ-58° 



^V-s 



'2? 






i 





, • So compact, so 
f©) °J sophisticated. 






■'% 



^H^^^HHH ■■■ ■ 











AVAILABLE NOW! 

FANTASTIC 2-METER H/JVs 

HIGH PERFORMAN( n E AT A GREAT PRICE 

• IM-F1TH World's smallest 5 watt H.T, 

• DJ-162TR Full featured 2-meter comes 
standard with EDC-34 rapid charger 



New Model DJ-580T 




i 






m 1 






i* n 



RATED # 1 IN JAPAN, NOW AVAILABLE IN 
THE U.S. 

A super-compact handheld, the tiny DJ-580T is a 
powerful, feature-packed twin bander. This super* 
compact HT is the smallest you'll find, and literally fits 
in the palm of your hand. 

Ergonomic design, combined with excellent sensitivity 
and unbelievable great sound, sets a new standard for 
miniature HTs. 

New MCF function allows you to set the 40 memory 
channels regardless of which channels you want for 
VHP or UHF, Any combination is possible. 

Alinco's DJ-580T has Full-Duplex Cross Band 
Operation and Cross Band Repeater Functions with 
real world power and excellent sensitivity. Airband 



receive with simple modification. 

If the battery is depleted to less than 5 volts, Alinco *s 
Patented Super Low Battery Consumption Function is 
automatically activated. You can continue to operate 
the radio all the way down to 3,5 volts. This feature is 
effective with dry cell batteries only. 

This unit has built in DSQ for paging, CTCSS encode 
and decode standard, various scanning functions, 3 
power level selections for each band, bell function, and 
an illuminated keypad. 

Check out the affordable technology of the 90*s. 
Check out ALINCO. 




ALINCO 

ELECTRONICS INC, 



ALINCO ELECTRONICS INC. 

438 Amapola Avenue, Unit 1 30, Torrance. ( 'A 90501 
Tel. (310) 618-8616 Fax CUQ) 618-8758 



Two Year Limited Warranty. 

Specifications and features are subject to change without notice or obligation. 

CIRCLE 67 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



6200 PRINT " Mode: »j 

6210 IF MODE = 1 THEN PFUNT *LSB*; 

6220 IF MODE -2 THEN PRINT "USB"; 

6230 IF MODE = 3 THEN PRINT "CW »; 

6240 IF MODE = 4 THEN PRINT "FM "; 

6250 IF MODE -5 THEN PRINT *AM -; 

6260 IF MODE =6 THEN PRINT "F3K': 

6300 PRINT -Function:'; 

6310 IF FUNC=Q THEN PRINT "VFO A "; 

6320 IF FUNC = 1 THEN PRINT 'VFO B "; 

6330 IF FUNC=2 THEN PRINT "Memory ";:PRINT 

MC; 
6340 PRINT 
6350 RETURN 



Running the Program 

If the above program lines are combined, 

you have a complete BASIC program that 
can control your Kenwood radio. You wilJ 
need to choose the proper communications 
port number (1 or 2) in lines 100, 510 and 
520, When you run the program, press the 
F3 key and you will be prompted to enter 
a radio command. First try the ID; command. 
You should see a line displayed on your 
computer display which is the response from 
the radio. The ID command response should 
look like "IDOGn;", where n is a number 



MODEL SG-2000 HF SSB RADIOTELEPHONE 
GLOBAL COMMUNICA TIONS FOR DA TA AND VOICE 

Most bams would never subject our SG-2000 all frequency HF trans- 
ceiver to tbe kind of extreme conditions we designed it for. You'd 
likely be satisfied having 150 watts output* 644 ITU channels* 100 
user defined (bam) frequencies in memory plus a direct entry VFO 
with 1 Hz stability, full frequency coverage ; CWwith sidetone and a 
superb 2:1 IF shape factor. Features such as FCC Type Approval, 
made with pride in America* direct Weatberfax support* up to 8 
control beads and full performance from -22Fto -tl40F might seem 
a bit extreme. But if you *ve ever chewed tbe rag on 20 meters in a 
Force 9 Arctic gale* you'll appreciate that there's a difference be- 
tween extreme performance and performance in tbe extremes. 



EXTREM 



FORMANCE 



SCC BuUding, 1 j -$71L Mtb St PObox 5526 Belleriw, WA jM5£M, Tekx: JMJ4. fit* 2fa*tim* M (Mi ~4fc>5 




CIRCU IBS ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Contact Advertisers Easily 
Use your Reader Service Card 



that corresponds to the model of your 
radio (for example, ID003 is relumed by a 
TS-940.} Next, try the All; command. 
This command will cause the radio to report 
its status whenever a change is made. 
After entering the All; command, turn 
the radio tuning dial, and you should see 
the response displayed on your computer 
screen. 

A description of the radio commands ap- 
pears at Che end of this article. 

RF1 

Computers in the ham shuck have been 
notorious for causing interference to the 
ham receiver. I have had the opportunity 
to use an original model IBM PC, an IBM 
PCjr and an IBM PC Convertible (laptop) 
in my shack. Each of these PCs has caused 
some interference, but I've found that the 
interference is reduced to an acceptable level 
by; 

• use of shielded cables for antenna connec- 
tions, and 

• separation of the radio antenna from the 
computer, 

In other words, the proximity of the anten- 
na to the computer is more significant than 
the pickup of interference from computer in- 
terconnections to its keyboard, display or 
other outboard computer accessories. 

I could detect no increase in interference 
when I connected the PC to the TS-940S as 
described, even with the simple home-brew 
level converter. When the radio sends infor- 
mation to the PC, there may be a slight, 
detectable signal for a brief tract ion of a sec- 
ond as the computer reads and processes the 
serial data stream. 

What Else Can You Do? 

The hardware interface described in this 
article is complete, but the software only 
scratches the surface of what you can do, I 
encourage you to use the program to experi- 
ment with how your radio accepts and re- 
sponds to commands. Once you have a feel 
for how this software works, you can use it as 
the basis for: 

• a logging program that gets frequency and 
mode data directly from your radio, 

• a program that stores station call and fre- 
quency information for S WL stations on PC 
disk, 

• a contest program that stores frequency 
information for stations you've heard but 
want to return later to contact, 

• a satellite program that calculates satellite 
passes and tunes your radio — and even, 
with some additional hardware, positions 
your antennas, 

• a packet program that allows you to select 
the frequencies of HF and VHF bulletin 
boards, and 

• programs thai only you can imagine as 
you use the power of your computer and 
radio to enhance your favorite modes of 

ham radio operation. 






36 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 





THE JAPAN RADIO CO. 




THE NEXT GENERATION IN 
HIGH-PERFORMANCE HF RECEIVERS 



Once again JRC breaks new ground in 
shortwave receiver design. The new 
NRD-535 has all the features SWLs 
and amateurs have been waiting for 
General coverage from 0.1 to 30 MHz 
in AM, USB, LSB, CW, RTTY, FAX and 
Narrow FM modes. Advanced ECSS 
operation for phase-lock AM reception. 
Variable bandwidth control (BWC). 
Tuning accuracy to 1 Hz possible with 
direct digital synthesis. 200 memory 
channels with scan and sweep oper- 
ation. Triple Superheterodyne receiving 



system. Superb sensitivity, selectivity 
and image rejection. Dual-widtfr noise 
blanker eliminates impulse noise. 
Squelch, RF Gain, Attenuator, AGC 
and Tone controls. Optional RTTY 
demodulator available. 24 hour clock/ 
timer. Easy to read vacuum fluorescent 
display with digital 3-meter. AC and DC 
operation. Plus the most comprehen- 
sive computer interface found on any 
radio to date. Call or write today for a 
full color brochure, price list and dealer 
information. 



JRC dapan Radio Co., Jttd. 



MAIN OFFICE: Akasaka Twin Tower (Main), Akasaka 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107. JAPAN 

Tel.: (03) 584-8836 Telex; 242-5420 JRCTOK J 

IN U.S.A.: 430 Park Avenue (2nd Floor). New York, NY 10022 
Tel.: (212) 355-1180 FAX: (212) 319-5227 Telex: 961114 JAPAN RADIO NYK 



Number 1 1 cm your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Dick Goodman WA3USG 



LOGic Jr. and LOGic II Vers. 
2.1 Ham Logging Software 



Discover the versatility of a 
computerized logbook. 



Personal Database Applications 

2616 Meadow Ridge Dr, 

DuluthGA 301 36-6037 

Telephone: (404) 242-0887; Fax: (404) 449-6687 
Price Class: LOGic Jr. $39; LOGic II Vers. $79* 



LOGic Jr. and LOGic II from Personal Data- 
base Applications are state-of-the-art in- 
tegrated database management systems ded- 
icated to amateur radio logging, LOGic Jr. is 
the entry level program and will enable the 
user to get started with his or her logging 
requirements. This review will cover the major 
aspects of both as used on the IBM-PC. LOGic 
is also written for the Commodore Amiga and 
the Atari ST. The user's manual also states 
that a Mac version wilt soon be available. 

The LOGic logging system is extremely 
user friendly. Even the uninitiated computer 
user will be able to start basic logging within a 
few minutes after installation. As knowledge 
of the system increases, virtually any type of 
logging function imaginable can be imple- 
mented. Supported functions of LOGic Jr. in- 
clude: 

1 . Logging in real time (auto entry of date/ 
time) and non-real time; 

2. Auto logging of data from previous QSOs; 

3. Automatic tracking of virtually any award; 

4. QSL management; 

5. User-definable fields in the log; 

6. Extremely versatile print function, prints 
log reports, awards progress, beam head* 
ings, QSL Cards and labels; 

7. Up to 20 pages of free-form notes/com- 
ments stored per QSO. 

tf LOGic II is purchased, the following func- 
tions are included: 

1 . Interface capability to most computer con- 
trolled rigs; logs mode, frequency and 
band; 

2. Control of the radio with full screen memo- 
ry display; 

3. Auto duping and scoring for almost any 
contest including user generation of con- 
test parameters; 

4. Meng-driven report writer, enabling de- 
sign of your own customized printouts, 
labels, and QSL cards; 

5. QSL database manager facility; 

6. Gray line propagation chart; 

7. Control of any antenna rotor with RS-232 
interface capability. 

Some Background 

The LOGic logging system was written in 
"DBMAN/' a commercially available applica- 
tions development system. This system is 
used by many large corporations and govern- 

38 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



,ocal 17:00:22 93/B9/9Z DEFAULT- Contest ttode OFF. 

ACTION- S^« P Abandon, Changs, OFF 



'K'-IXKX 



sails 

tot workec 



HftNK 
ELUOHRNr 



UTC 22:00 03/09 

b?° He tun |i: yfeVS Km:lSShV 




rcuD: 



Loc at ion : 


Tim dif : 14.0 


VICTORIA 




DHCC ;UK 


Con tiiier it ;0C 


AUSTRALIA 




Bureau -V 


Third pty"V 


Zone OQ:30 

' 


ITU: 59 TiMZ: -9.0 
. _ j 



Motes = 



Prefix 



.tii 



>nt : 



USE?; LOGIC 



10101: 




tint On 

data 

t lite off 



_.:i:SG-lS 
: 0.1**07 -*?2 



rfiL cents] p*fr- = | 

Bcvd: j 
Address "29 



1(30.0' 



oPerator 
contest id 



JN4A77 



- Display surrounding records 3. Select radio 
. Load UFO Hen file 

Pre 15 <F?> for express keys whi le Logging. Adding, or Changing . 



Photo A LOGic 's fogging screen. This is oniy one of many possible configurations. 



ment agencies for the creation of large inte- 
grated database management applications 
used in PC environments. Using a system 
such as this keeps the developer from "re-in- 
venting the wheel" because many subrou- 
tines and functions are included with the de- 
velopment system and do not have to be 
written "from scratch." Since these functions 
are utilized in programs written by different de- 
velopers, they are proven reliable many times 
over. I have seen programs, logging and other* 
wise, that did not execute reliably because 
they were not tested adequately! Since I write 
software for a living myself, I feel that those 
with a good degree of computer literacy will find 
this an important factor in deciding whether or 
not to purchase any software package. 

Incidentally, some of the DBMAN com- 
mands and functions are available for use 
even if you don't have a copy of the DBMAN 
language. This will allow extensive global up- 
dating and diverse manipulation of your data- 
base. Be careful, however, because some 
commands, such as "ZAP," will totally erase 
a database in one fell swoop! Ensure that your 
database is backed up before you experiment, 
but by all means experiment. This is one sys- 
tem that is limited only by your imagination! 

Installation 

The IBM version of the LOGic system may 
be ordered on any IBM compatible media 
(360K, 720K, 1 .2M, or 1 ,44M disks). ! received 
mine on two 1.2M floppy disks. The system 



requires a hard drive to run. The "LOGic Main 
Disk" has the installation file on it. You are 
required to make a directory on your hard 
drive where the LOGic system will reside, and 
then to run the installation program. The docu- 
mentation is excellent. With LOGic II, two 
manuals are provided. The first is approxi- 
mately 80 pages long and covers all aspects of 
installation and use of LOGic Jr. and LOGic II. 
The second manual is applicable to the "Re- 
port Writing" function of LOGic. Both docu- 
ments are high quality, desktop published 
manuals with the camera ready copy being at 
(east laser-print quality. These manuals are 
the highest quality software documentation 
that I have reviewed to date! Finally, LOGic 
requires 450K of free memory to execute. 

installation on my 80286-based machine 
went smoothly and was precisely documented 
in the user's manual. After installation, a se- 
ries of menus are presented. These allow the 
setting of station parameters such as caiisign, 
location (latitude and longitude), offset to 
UTC, screen colors, screen configuration, and 
selection of fields that you want to have a 
default value in your log. Once these parame- 
ters are installed, you can begin logging. 

Operation 

Using this system is as easy as entering the 
logging screen from the main menu and typ- 
ing in the information. I found the default data 
entry screen to be well designed and quite 
striking in its layout. When a caiisign is en- 



GaAsFET 
PREAMPS 

at a fraction of the cost 
of comparable units! 



LNG-(*) 

ONLY $59 




wired/test ecf 



FEATURES: 

* Very low noise: 0.7dB vhf, O.SdB uhf 

* High gain: 13-20dB r depends on freq 

* Wide dynamic range - resist overload 

* Stable; low-feedback dual-gate FET 

*Specify tuning ranger 26-30, 46-56, 137-150, 

150-172, 210-230, 400-470, 800-960 MHz. 




LNW-(*) 

MINIATURE 



only $29 «. $44 



wired/tested 

• GaAs FET Preamp similar to LNG, ex- 
cept designed for low cost & small size. 
Only 5/8 1l W x 1-5/81 x 3/4"H. Easily 

mounts in many radios. 

*Sp0(ilfy tuning range: 25-35, 35-55, 65-90, 90- 120 r 
120-150, 150-200, 2QO-270, 400-500 MHz. 



LNS-(*) 

IN-LINE PREAMP 




$89 



ONLY ^>0SI kit, $779 wired/tested 

» GaAs FET Preamp with features similar 
to LNG series, except automatically 
switches out of line during transmit. 
Use with base or mobile transceivers up to 
25W, Tower mounting brackets incl. 

*SpGcsfy tuning range: 120-175, 200*240, or 
400-500 MHz. 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 

GaAs FET preamps with 3 or 4 section 
helical resonators reduce inter mod & 
cross-band interference in critical appli- 
cations. MODEL HRG-H, $80 vhf, 

$110 Uhf. *Spetify tuning range: 142-150, 150- 
182, 162-174, 213-233, 420-470 MHz. 




RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 

Law noise converters to receive vhf and 
uhf bands on a 10M receiver Choice of 
kit with case & BNC jacks , kit less case 
$49, kit w/case $74, w/t in case $99. 
Request catalog for complete listings. 

* VHF input ranges avail: 136-138, 

144-146, 145-i47 n 146-148 MHz. 

* UHF input ranges avail: 432-434, 
435-437, 435.5-437.5 MHz. 

TRANSMITTING 
CONVERTERS 

XV2 tor vhf and XV4 for uhf* Models to 
convert 10M ssb ? cw, fm, etc, to 2M r 432, 
435, and for atv. 1W output. 
Kit only $89. PA's up to 45W available. 

Request catalog for complete listings, 



ACCESSORIES 




TD-3 SUBAUDIBLE TONE DECODER/ 
Adjustable for any tone. 
Designed especially for repeaters, with 
remote control activate/deactivate provi- 
sions kit $29. wired/tested $69 




COR-3 REPEATER CONTROLLER. 
Features adjustable tail and time-out 
timers, solid-stale relay, courtesy beep. 
and local speaker amplifier kit $49 

CWID. Diode programmed any time in 
the fieJd r adjustable tone, speed, and 
timer, to go with COR-3 kit $59 




COR-4 kit. Complete COR and CWID 
all on one board for easy construction. 
CMOS logic for low power consumption- 
Many new features, EPROM pro- 
gram med ; specify oaf I kit $99 , w/t $ 1 59 




TD-2 TOUCH-TONE DECODER/CON- 
TROLLER kit. Full 16 digits, with toll-calf 
restrictor, programmable. Can turn 5 
functions on/off. Great for selective call- 
ing, too! kit $89, wired/tested $149 

AP-3 AUTOPATCH kit, Use with above 

for repeater autopatch. Reverse patch 
and phone line remote control are std 
— , ,krt $89, wired/tested $149 

AP*2 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH Timing 
Board kit. Use with above for simplex 
operation using a transceiver kit $39 




MO-202 FSK DATA MODULATOR kit 
Run up to 1200 baud digital signals 

through any fm transmitter with full 
handshakes. Radio link computers, 
telemetry gear, etc kit $49, w/t $79 

DE-202 FSK DEMODULATOR kit. For 
receive end of fink kit $49, w/t $79 

9500 BAUD DIGITAL RF LINKS. LOW- 
cost packet networking system, 

consisting of new MO-96 Modem and 
Special versions of our 220 or 450 mHz 

FM Transmitters and Receivers. Inter- 
face directly with most TNC's, Fast, 

diode-switched PA's output 15 or 5QW. 



For complete info, call or write for free catalog. 

Send $2 for overseas air mail. 

Fcr casual interest JUS. on\yi check reader service; allow 3-4 weeks 

Order by mail, fax, or phone (9-12, 1-5 eastern time). 

Min. $5 S&H Charge for first pound plus addl weights insurance. 

Use VISA, Mastercard, check, or UPS C.O.D. ($5tee) 



if you always thought a microprocessor-controlled 
repeater had to be expensive, LOOK AGAIN! You 
could easily spend this much just for a controller. 

REP-200 REPEATER 

A premium repeater with autopatch and many versatile dtmf 
control features at less than many charge for a bare-bones repeater! 

We don't skimp on rf modules, either J Check the features on 
R144 Receiver, for instance: GaAs FET front-end, helical 
resonators, sharp crystal filters, hysteresis squelch, 



Kit $1095; w/t only $1295! 




Other models available: 

REP-200V Economy Repeater Kit. As above, 

except uses COR-4 Controller without DTMF control or autopatch. Kit only $795. 

REP-200N Repeater with no controller, For use with external controller, 
such as those made by ACC. Kit only $695, w/t %995. 

• Available for the 143-174,213-233, 420-475, 902 92B MHzbands. 
FCC type accepted for commercial service (vhf and uhf). 

* Rugged exciter and PA, designed for continuous duty. 

• Power out 15W (25W option) 143-174 MHz; 15W 213-233; 10Wuhf or902^928MHz, 

• Accessory add-on PA's available with power levels up to 1Q0W T 

* Six courtesy beep types, including two pleasant, sequential, multi-tone bursts. 

■ AUTOPATCH: either open or closed access, toll-call restrict, auto-disoonnect. 

* Reverse Autopatch: two types, auto-answer or ring tone on the air. 

■ Pulse (rotary) dial option available. 

• DTMF CONTROL: over 45 functions can be controlled by touch -tone. Separate 
4-digit controi code for each function, plus extra 4-digit owner password. 

* Owner can inhibit autopatch or repeater, enable either open- or closed-access for 
repeater or autopatch, and enable toll cafts, reverse patch, kerchunk filter, site 
alarm, aux revr, and other options, including two auxiliary externa* circuits, 

* The cwid message, dtmf command codes, and owner-specified default parameters 
for cor and cwid timers and tones are burned into the eprorn at the factory. 

• Cw speed and tone h courtesy beep and tail timers, and courtesy beep type can all 
be changed at any time by owner-password-protected dtmf commands. 
Auxiliary receiver input for independent control or cross linking repeaters, 
Many built-in diagnostic & testing functions using microprocessor. 
Color coded led's indicate status of all major functions. 

Welded partitions for exciter, pa, receiver, and controller. PEM nuts hold covers. 
3-1/2 fnch aluminum rack panel, finished in eggshell white and black. 



HIGH PERFORMANCE XMTRS & 

RCVRS FOR REPEATERS, AF & 

DIGITAL LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC 

FM EXCITERS: 2W continuous 
duty. TCXO & xtal oven options. 
FCC type accepted for com 7 
high Band & uhf* 

* TA51: 143-174, 213-233 
MHz ...kit $109, w/t $139. 

•TA451; 420-475 MHZ 
..,kitS109, w/t $189. 

* TA901 : 902-928 MHz, 
(0.5Wout);w/t$219. 

* VHF & UHF AMPLIFIERS. 
For fm, ssb, atv. Output levels from 
10W to 1 00 W. Severai models starting at £ 

FM RECEIVERS: 

• R144/R220 FM RECEIVERS for 143-174 
or 213-233 MHz. GaAs FET front end, 
0.1 5uV sensitivity! Both crystai & ceramic 
if filters plus helical resonator front end 
for exceptional selectivity: > 100dB at 
+ 12kHz (best aval table anywhere!) 
Flutter-proof hysteresis squelch; afc 
tracks drift. ...kit $149, w/t $219. 

• R451 FM RCVR, for 420^475 MHz. 
Simifarto above. „.kit$l49, w/t $219. 

• R901 FM RCVR, for 902-928MHz. 
Triple-con version , GaAs FET front end. 
...S169 ] w/t$249. 

* R76 ECONOMY FM RCVR for 28-30, 50-54, 73-76, 143-174, 213-233 MHz, 
w/o helical res or afc. ...Kits $129, w/t $219. 

• R137 WEATHER SATELLITE RCVR for 137 MHz. Kit $129, w/t $219. 



OUR 30 IN YhARf 



amironics, mc 

65 MOUL RD. - HILTON NY 14468-9535 
Phone 716-392-9430 - fax 716-392-9420 




CIRCLE 57 ON READER SERVICE CARD 





ucson Aaateur Pacfcet Radio 
RX.2S Level 2 Uersion 2,9 
Holea^e 1.1.2 l2/fr2^fJ5 - 
Chscksun $33 
end :cs 

10 Link state 
Link state 



TOT? 

16 K MH 



Personal Da la base 
Applica lions 



P$ 



strean 
Gtre&n 
stfean 
otrean 
stream 
utrean 

y tjffjar. 

UtrVrfll 




-JACTIQK: 
nll=lSinR 

th = 



Personal Da If 
Applications 



Arbndspiy 
^blYCftLL 



Link state 
Link state 
Link state 
Link state 
Link state 
Link state 
Link state 
Link state 



IS 
IS 

is 
is 
is 
is 

is 
is 
is 
is 



DISCONKECIED 
0I5CONHECIED 
DISCONNECTED 
DISCONNECTED 
DISCONNECTED 
DISCONNECTED 
DISCONNECTED 
DISCONNECTED 
DISCONNECTED 
DISCONNECTED 



wwzy 



i or,k form 



iocal 14:2 i :4fi H3^mv9 3 



DEFAULT 



Cant* et Hod« qPP. 



Tmn 



Gat „ F ind , Prau r N«Kt ., Adjft , Lag, Ratui»» r Changs , Grac* , Of f 

Heading: 313/153° Return: 2 2/202° Hi= 9426 Km 15169 



um 



st 



Location; Tinas difs -9-1. B 

SPJtATLV ISLAND. S CM IMA SEA 



QSL Info for 1S1RB: 
U4FftJ 

Gee entry: JOHN PAKflOI7 P W4FRU 



Date iBS/iVy**! 
!i^irco:Uft2UZI 



FOB S127 \ tflJPFOUU Ufl Z343S 



C changes , U copies Co Uia, 

A copies to flddr, <sp4.ee> for QSL screen, < (Return? continues 



i. Displa* 
2. Load 
Press <F7> for express 



Lay £iirrflunding records 
UFO Men file 



3. Select martin 

4. Notes 

keys uh i le Loya inu . 



Adding, 



5. Switch screens 

6 . Address 
pr Chantring . 



Photo B. LOGic runs under Windows or DesqView* Here LOGic is being run under Windows 3 t simufta 
neousfy with an external packet program. 



tered, a window pops up Identifying the loca- 
tion of the station, its continent time differ- 
ence, time zone, DXCC prefix, CQ zone, ITU, 
whether the country is supported by the QSL 
bureau, and if third party traffic is permitted. 
On the top of the screen, the short and long 
path beam headings are displayed, along with 
the distance to the station. LOGic also informs 
you if you have worked the station before, If 
you are using one of the many transceivers 
with a computer interface, automatic logging 
of mode, frequency, and band may be accom- 
plished. Complete remote control of the radio 
is also possible. LOGic will automatically aim 
your antenna at either the long or short path 
directions at the touch of a function key if you 
have a rotor with an RS-232 interface (1 did not 
review the radio interface or antenna aiming 
function). 

While entering data, on-line help is avail- 
able for each field by pressing the appropriate 
function key. LOGic also utilizes intelligent 
edit criteria to minimize errors in data entry. 
Input of band, mode, state, and several other 
parameters are checked against internal ta- 
bles for valid values. All data in these tables 
may be modified by the user. For example, 
changing the values of frequencies in the 
band table for your license class will enable 
LOGic to warn you if you are operating out of 
your allocated frequency range. 

Screens may be modified for virtually any 
contest and called tip instead of the default 
screen. LOGic includes screens for almost all 
major contests already formatted and ready to 
select via the Select Screen Configuration 
Menu. LOGic also provides for automatic in- 
crementing of contest serial number, dupe 
checking, and multiplier tracking, When con* 
test data is entered, it may be merged in with 

40 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 



your existing tog, or easily removed at the 
completion of the contest. 

Inquiry and locating data in LOGic is simple 
and fast. LOGic uses indexed files for both 
date and calisign. No matter how large the 
database becomes, inquiry by call or date (or 
partial call or date), is effectively instanta- 
neous. LOGic also will allow inquiry via se- 
quential file search of any field (or any charac- 
ter string within a field). While this is not 
immediate (and takes longer as the database 
becomes larger), I found that with a log with 
1,800 entries I could search any field within 
20-30 seconds. Display of multiple records on 
one screen is also possible. In this format, it 
emulates the ARRL logbook configuration. 

LOGic's report generation facility is menu- 
driven and superb (it also comes with its own 
60-page manual). It contains many pre-config- 
ured reports that will probably satisfy most 
requirements. Tabular reports, envelopes, 
QSL labels, and several other normal logging 
formats are provided. These reports may be 
modified or other reports created from scratch 
if desired. 

LOGic even includes a mail merge capabili- 
ty. This will allow you to generate letters and 
personalize them with data from your logging 
database. 

If you are presently using another logging 
program, chances are that LOGic will allow 
you to import data from it. LOGic comes with 
programs to import data from K1EA CT 
(through Version 7), ARIES-1 and 2, HAM- 
RAD, KT5X Contest Logging program, and 
Swisslog. LOGic will also import data from 
DBASE 111 files, standard ASCII fixed-length 
(SDF) files, or comma-delimited ASCII files. 
Unless your present logging system uses 
some really non-standard, proprietary storage 



format, it should be capable of being 
imported into LOGic. 



Awards Tracking 

LOGic really shines when it 
comes to tracking awards. This sys- 
tem will display your status in virtual- 
ly any major award in existence. 
LOGic comes ready to track WAS, 
DXCC, WAC, WAZ, 10-10 numbers, 
County Hunting, and Russian 
Oblasts. Others may be added as 
you get more familiar with the soft- 
ware. The only thing that you have to 
be especially careful about when 
tracking awards is to ensure that 
your latest QSL information is cor- 
rectly input. 

LOGic derives all other necessary 
parameters such as ITU zone, CQ 
zone and DXCC country name from 
its large prefix tables (greater than 
3,800 entries!). For WAS and 
5BWAS, LOGic uses the two char- 
acter state code that you enter dur- 
ing the logging process. This state 
code is checked in tables to ensure 
accuracy as you enter it. After I had 
imported in excess of 1 ,800 log en- 
tries from a DBASE 111 based logging 
system, LOGic built all necessary 
awards tables and indices in a mat- 
ter of two minutes for a DXCC status report. I 
did not import the DXCC country name but let 
LOGic generate that data from its prefix ta- 
bles. The results were right on the money, all 
stations worked were located in the prefix ta- 
bles and the report sent to my printer. 

The report displays callsign, country name, 
date and time worked, frequency, mode, QSL 
status, and signal exchange. Upon comple- 
tion, a summary is generated showing total 
stations reported worked and a confirmed/ 
non-confirmed ratio using QSL status data. 
The report is well formatted and very useful (1 
didn't realize how far I still was from getting 
DXCC!). 

Final Kudos 

While LOGic does not contain a formal 
packet cluster interface, a small communica- 
tions terminal program is included that will run 
in the background with LOGic and allow ac- 
cess to your TNC. 

LOGic also has a comprehensive database 
of QSL managers. This is updated on a period* 
ic basis and is available as an option to the 
user LOGic even has a built-in contest keyer 
for sending CQs and repetitive data during 
CW contests! 

In summary, I found LOGic fast, easy to use, 
and perhaps most important, reliable. It is a 
serious logging program for those who want to 
document more then "Hello and Goodbye" 
QSOs. The capability to add tailored fields 
and virtually unlimited remarks allows the 
user to effectively design his/her own logging 
system without having to learn a high level 
computer language. My suggestion is that if 
you're in the market for a state-of-the-art com- 
puter logging system, give LOGic a try. You 
will not be disappointed 



Six Function DTMF Controller 



Auto- Kail 
AK-4 




• Out puis 2 Of 3 latched, 1 or 2 momentary. 1 timed and 1 

maritally resei group-call latched tor remoie alarm 

• DiNiunl ctfn for turning outputs orVOlf NOT tangle on/nfl like 
most olhers! ■ Wrong number reset 

• 4-diyit acess code - can use * up down 

■ Multiple group -call response ■ On -board 1 -amp relay 




y/£A 



MoTron |q| 
Electronics 



AK-4K 

(board'hif) . $69.95 

AK-4W 

I* red/ (Hied board I . . $89.95 
AK-4C {Conp*tte unit « metal *r-clo* 

310 Garfiekl St*, Suite 4 "'^ ■* m :au! ^.fiftS 

Eu9ene.OR97402 »*^^«M 

Orders 1 -800-338- 9058 Info 503-687-2 n 8 

Fax 503^87-2492 



CIRCLE 248 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



THIS MONTH'S GOODIE FROM THE CANDY STORE 

I 



T 1 

RDC | 



KEHWOOO 

TH-7SA 

£M9.» 




S4ml«r SaiHnfli On Ymm, Atlron, 
loom, HpG«in, AlftOO, Be Al LT.O. 

MFJ 1734 UNDER 114.00 
Qvv 9034 Hom Ifcmfi n Stock. «J Pricw. Cadi FOB Prsston 
Mot« Sp«CHUl in HAM- ADS Locfc^s fa Som#t*ing not Ustptf* 

Caltf WfiM 

floss OfsraauTiNC compact 

TO 5. St»» 5lT**4, Prtmion, Id 83263 - TttOphon* C2C0) B5?-DB» 
Hour i Tut. -ft L H-9-IM«xi»ri tlo«»d S*L 4 Sun 



* Al born inrihg 
WUftvitRmt 

x repBWrfiltbr 
youritoodr^ 

* Mr (KOI per hat 

*DX -tiffany! 

* Graf it flesnjo 




ft takes a WHAMMIN' and keeps on HAMMIN' 

mHertkMmtrkotmtott Worldwide tmtartz 

OUTMCXER ANTENNA SAUS THIUN AERIAL* 

330 Cabr Glen Grde e^ 2,3 Tempi Wo* 

*■—- TN 37412 WHettwi WA 61 55 AUST1AUA 

(niDkow reL (011)6794576738 

^ f« [011)6194577737 



CIRCLE 262 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Clnll 




Stop Smoking. 

^American Heart Association 



Computer-Transceiver 
Interfaces 

The CW232 Is A High-Quality 

Interface to Connect Your PC 

To Your Kenwood, Icom, or 

Yaesu! Added Isolation And 

Safety For Your Rig And PC! 

Available As Kit or Fully Assembled! 

Kit Includes PC Board and All Parts! 

ALL CABLES INCLUDED!!! 

CW232K (Kenwood) Kit $34.95 Assd $49.95 

CW232Y (Yaesu) Kit S39.95 Assd $54,95 

CW232I (Icom) Kit $39.95 Assd $54,95 

Add $3 Shipping/Handling to All Orders 

COD Orders at 

1-800-547-7479 (Orders Only/24hrs) 

COD Add $4.00 

SASE For INFO and Catalog! 

CW Enthusiasts 

Suite S 1346 Erickson 

Columbus, OH 43227-2061 



Syslefi 



LIFETIME 
WARRANTY 



CIRCLE 260 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Quality Microwave TV Antennas 



WlllELESS CABLE * IRS * MMDS Amateur TV 
lillra High Gain 50dbj+) - Tuneable 1.9 Id 27 Gtir 

• 55- Channel Dish System $199.95 

• 36- Channel Dish System Si 49.95 

• 2ft- Cti annef Dish System $ 1 24.95 

. i , ; M- \y. iii riHiciai G-h3 a ii'i-i mm mot Iw* i| ;>■'•'. l.-\so.< 

• Tnji a .ni'irii^ Composer ft Cusiom Tuning Available 

• m ur #r*rt (SASEi lor fR£E Cjiiioq 

PHLUFS-TECH BfCTRONKS 

PA Box 9533 . Saittofete. Al «52S2 

1602) M7 7700 iS3 00 Credit all prww ordeal 



CIRCLE 254 ON HEADER SERVICE CAPO 



CIRCLE 249 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



BATTERIES 



You've bought our replacement batteries before . . . 
NOW YOU CAN BUY DIRECT FROM US, THE MANUFACTURER! 



HHHMM 




ICON 
CM2 T BP2 7„2v @ 500 MAH 
CMS, BP5 10.8v (a 500 MAH 

SUPER 

7S 13.2v @ 1200 MAH 

8S 9.6v@ 1200 MAH 

(base charge only— 1 " longer) 

ICOM CHARGERS AVAILABLE 




'& 



Discover now accepted 
NY5 residents add 
8 V*% sates tax. 
Add S3 50 for postage 
and handling. 



FOR THE MONTH OF MAY 

10% off 

on all Alinco 

Replacement battery packs 

*EBP-10NA EBP-16N 
*EBP-12NA EBP-18N 

* works with side charger and drop-in charger 

Look for June's Special of the Month 
Monthly discounts applicable to End-users ONLY. 




CUSTOM MADE BATTERY 
PACKS & INSERTS 

Made to your specifications 
Introductory Offer! 

KENWOOD INSERTS 

PB-25 PB-21 

PB-26 PB-24 

ICOM INSERTS 

BP-3 BP-7 

BP-5 BP-S 



Prices and specifications subject to change without notice 

SOURCE FOR ALL YOUR COMMUNICATION 
; BATTERY REPLACEMENT NEEDS. 

W & W ASSOCIATES 

29-11 Parsons Boulevard, Flushing, N.Y. 11354 
WORLD WIDE DISTRIBUTORSHIPS AVAILABLE. PLEASE INQUIRE, 




i 



MADE IN 

THE U.S.A. 

SEND FOR 
FREE CATALOG 
AND PRICE LIST 



mt 



In U.S. & Canada Call Toll Free (800) 221-0732 • IN NYS (718) 961-2103 • Telex: 51060 16795 • FAX: (718) 461-1978 

CIRCLE 191 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



J 

41 



Number 13 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by David Cassidy N1GPH 



Daiwa PS-304 Regulated 
Power Supply 



Electronics Distributors Corp. 

325 Mill St. 

Vienna VA 22180 

Telephone: (7031 938-8105 

Price Class: $170 



I have never really thought much about 
acquiring a testbench power supply before. 

All of my DC power supply needs have been 
served by standard 12V supplies, with the cur- 
rent rating to match whatever equipment I was 
running. 

Recently* IVe been doing a lot of circuit 
building. Testing out different circuits is diffi- 
cult or, if you need other than standard 12V, 
impossible to do with a power supply designed 
to just sit there and quietly give you 12V. To 
aid in my circuit and component testing, I 
picked up a Daiwa PS-304 regulated DC pow- 
er supply, I have to admit, now that I have one t 
I don't know how I survived 20 years of ham- 
ming without it. 

Up Front 

The PS-304 is a rock-solid piece of gear. 
It provides variable DC voltage from 1V to 
15V t and current up to 30 amps intermittent 
(1 minute on/3 minutes off) and 24 amps 
continuous (enough to power most HF rigs). 
A heavy-duty, enameled cabinet and firm, 
quality switches and connectors give the feel 
of a professional piece of test equipment. 
Being a testbench supply, all dials, switches 
and connectors are on the front pane* (unlike 
your basic 1 2V supply, where the connections 
are usually placed on the back). 

The face of the PS-304 is dominated by a 
voltage/amperage meter, switchable between 
the two by a rocker switch. This allows you to 
set the voltage to exactly what you need, as 
well as measure the current draw of a circuit 
or piece of gear. Voltage is easily set with a 
rotary knob. 

What makes the PS-304 such a convenient 
power supply to use is the abundance of pow- 
er connections available. There is a set of 
screw posts providing up to 30 amps T two sets 
of spring clips that provide up to 6 amps, and a 
standard cigarette lighter socket that provides 
up to 10 amps. This socket also has a light-fit- 

42 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 




ting cover plate, to keep dust out when not in 
use. Those who use cigarette lighter plugs to 
power their mobile gear will especially appre- 
ciate this feature. 

Documentation 

As you might expect, a power supply 
doesn't require an instruction book to operate 
it. Even so. the one-page instructions that 
come with the PS-304 are the hands-down 
winner for the "Bad Japanese Translation of 
the Year'' award. I actually laughed out loud at 
some of the twisted syntax and unique sen- 
tence construction (not to mention the typo- 
graphical errors). Since it doesn't take a rock- 
et scientist to operate a power supply, it is 
easier to be amused in this case than in some 
others 1 but the point must be made: When are 
foreign companies going to start hiring En- 
glish-speaking writers to supply them with En- 
glish instructions? Even the most complex in- 



struction manual could be rewritten in about a 
day, working from someone's bad translation, 
A single-page instruction sheet would take 
about 10 minutes to proofread and correct. In 
this day of desktop publishing and instant 
printing, this type of carelessness should 
cease. 

Thumbs Up 

Most power supplies are set up and then 
forgotten. You stick them under a desk, or 
on the back of a shelf, and as long as they 
don't break down you never give them another 
thought. The PS-304 is definitely NOT that 
kind of power supply, If you have varying 
power needs, or if you do even a modest 
amount of kit building or home-brewing, 
you will find this power supply fills your needs 
beautifully. The quality of construction and 
ease of use make this a superb addition to any 
ham's testbench. 




w 




Food for thought. 

Our new Universal Tone Encoder lends its versatility 
to all tastes. The menu includes all CTCSS, as well 
as Burst Tones, Touch Tones T and Test Tones. No 
counter or test equipment required to set frequency- 
just dial it in. While traveling, use it on your Amateur 
transceiver to access tone operated systems, or in 
your service van to check out your customers' re- 
peaters; also, as a piece of test equipment to modulate 
your Service Monitor or signal generator. It can even 
operate off an internal nine volt batten , and is available 
for one day delivery, backed by our one year warranty, 



All tones in Group A and Group B are included. 

Output level flat to within 1 .5db over entire range selected 

Separate level adjust pots and output connections for each 

tone Group. 

Immune to RF 

Powered by 6-3Qvdc, unregulated at 8 ma. 

Low impedance, low distortion, adjustable sinewave 

output, 5v peak-to-peak 

Instant start-up. 

Off position tor no tone output. 

Reverse polarity protection built-in. 



Group A 



67 l) XZ 


91.5 ZZ 


I18.8 2B 


156.7 5A 


71,9 XA 


94.8 ZA 


L23.0 3Z 


162.2 5B 


74.4 WA 


97.4 ZB 


127.3 3A 


167.9 6Z 


77.0 XB 


100,0 1Z 


13I.S.1R 


173,8 6A 


79.7 SP 


103.5 JA 


136 5 4Z 


H9.9 6B 


82,5 YZ 


L07.2 LB 


141.3 4A 


186.2 7Z 


85.4 YA 


N0.9 2Z 


146.2 4B 


192 8 7A 


88.5 YB 


114 k : A 


I5L4 5Z 


203.5 M 1 



• Frequency accuracy, ± . I Hz maximum - 40°C to + 85°C 

• Frequencies to 250 H/ available on special order 
■ Continuous tone 

Group B 



TEST TONES 


TOUCH-TONES: 


BURST TOMES: 


600 


697 1209 


1600 1850 2150 2400 


1000 


770 1336 


1650 1900 2200 2450 


LSOO 


B52 1477 


1700 1950 2250 2500 


2175 


941 1633 


1750 2000 2300 2550 


2805 




1800 2100 2350 



• Frequency accuracy, ± 1 Hz maximum - 40°C to + 85°C 

• Tone length approximately 300 ms. May be lengthened, 

shortened or eliminated hy changing value of resistor 

Model TE-64 $79.95 







COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, California 92667 
(800) 854-0547/ California: (714) 998-3021 






r : — 7"S 




CIRCLE 10 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




COMMUNICATIONS 



AOR Scanners. 

Great Performance. Great Service. Great Value 



Free Freight 

25-Day Money-Back Guarantee 
Toll-free Service and Support 
No Credit Card Surcharge 
One Year Warranty 




AR1000 



$429 



1000 Channels. 8-600MHz, 805-1300MHz 

Standard Features: 

■ Extremely compact size. 

* Continuous coverage (except UHF TV 600-805) 

* Antenna attenuator switch, lOdb. 

- Manual tuning knob, 

* Earphone jack, 3,5mm. 

■ AM, FM and wide band FM tuning modes. 

* Backlighted LCD display. 

■ 10 Scan Banks, 10 Search Banks, 

■ Selectable Priority Channel, 

■ Delay, Hold Features. 

* Selectable Search Increments, 5-955KHz, 

- Permanent memory backup, 

* 4 AA Ni Cad batteries included. 

■ AC adaptor /charger 

■ Carry Case. 

■ Cigarette Lighter Charger, 
Belt Clip. 

■ Earphone. 



Options: 

External Speaker, Mobile Mount 
Extended Warranty. 2/3 yrs 



M5I90 $19.50 
$45/ $55 



Specifications: 

Coverage: 

Sensitivity: 

Speed: 

IF: 

Increments: 

Audio; 

Power 

Antenna: 

Display: 

Dimensions: 



8-600, 805,1300MHz 
.35uV NFM, LOuV WFM, LOAM 
20 ch/sec, scan. 40 ch/sec. search 
561.225, 58.075, 455KHz or 10.7MH/ 

5 to 955KHz selectable/ 5 or 12 5 steps. 
,4 Watts 

Input 9 13,8 V. DC 

BNC 

LCD 

6 7/8Hxl3/4Dx21/2W, 12ozwt 




100 Channels. Low, Air, High, UHF & 
800MHz. 

Standard Features: 

■ Extremely compact size* 

♦ Unrestricted 800MHz coverage, 

* 100 channels permanent memory, 
- Earphone Jack & Attenuator. 

♦ Delay, Hold features, 

■ Channel 1 Priority. 

• 5 Scan Banks, 5 Search Banks, 

■ Telescopic and Flexible Antennas 
w/ BNC connector. 

• AC & DC Power cords w/ mtng hardware. 

* One Year Limited Warranty. 

Options: 

Base type antenna 

25 to 1000MHz w 50'coax. 
Mag Mnt Mobile Antenna. 15* coax. 
Cigarette Lighter power adaptor 
External Speaker 

with mobile mount 
Extended Warranty, 2/3 yrs 

Specifications: 

Coverage: 
Sensitivity: 



AS300 $59,95 
MAI 00 £25.00 
CP100 £4,00 

MS 100 SI 9.50 
£40/$55 



Scan Speed: 

IF: 

Increments: 

Audio; 

Power: 

Antenna: 

Display: 

Dimensions: 



27-54, 108-174, 406-512, 830-950MHz 

.4uV Lo,HL ,8uV Air. .5uV 

UHF. LOuVSOO 

15 ch/sec, 

21.4MHz, 455KHz 
10,12,5,25,30 

1W 

12.8VDC, 200MA 

BNC 

LCD w /backlight 

2 1/4H x 5 5/8W x 6 1 /2D. 14oz wt 



We offer 100's of communications products 



CIRCLE 164 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



COMMUNICATIONS 



AR2500 



$449 




2016 Channels, 1 MHz to 1500 MHz 

Standard Features 

•Continuous coverage 

• AM, FM, wide band FM, & BFO for SSB, CW. 

• 64 Scan Banks. 
•16 Search Banks. 

• RS232 port built in. 

•Includes AC/DC pwr crd. Antenna, Mntng Brckt. 

• One Year Limited Warranty, 



Options; 

Earphone. 

External Speaker. Mobile Mount, 
Extended Warranty, 2/3 yrs. 
Mobile Mounting Bracket. 
RS232 Control Package 



EP200 $2.00 
MSI 90 $19.50 
$65/75 
MM1 $14.90 
SCS2 $295.00 



(software & cable) offers spectrum display 
and database. 



Specifications: 

Coverage: 
Sensitivity: 

Speed: 

IF: 

Increments: 

Audio: 

Power: 

Antenna: 

Display: 

Dimensions: 



1 MHz - 1500MHz 
35uV NFM, l.OuV WFM, 
1.0AM/SSB/CW 

38 ch/sec. scan. 38 ch/sec. search 

750.00, 45,0275, 5.5MHz 455KHz 

5,12,5,25 KHz 

1 2 Watts at 4 ohms 

Input 13.8 V. DC 300mA 

BNC 

LCD, backlighted, 

2 1/4H x 5 5/8W x 6 1/2D Wt lib, 



AR3000 



$1095 




400 Channels. lOOKHz to 2036MHz. 

Standard Features: 

• Extremely compact size, 

• Continuous coverage 
•Attenuation Programmable by Channel. 

• Manual tuning knob. 

•Tuning increments down to 50Hz. 

•AM, FM, wide band FM, LSB, USB, CW modes. 

• Backlighted LCD display. 

•4 Scan and Search Banks, Lockout in Search. 

•4 Priority Channels. 

•RS232 control through DB25 connector. 

• Delay, Hold Features, 

• 15 band pass filters, GaAsFET RF amp. 

• Sleep and Alarm Features. 

•AC adaptor /charger. DC power cord, 

• Telescopic Antenna. 

Options: 

Earphone. 

External Speaker, Mobile Mount. 
Extended Warranty. 2/3 yrs. 
Mobile Mounting Bracket, 
RS232 Control Package 

(software & cable) offers spectrum display 

and database. 



EP200 $2.00 
MS190 $19-50 
$65/75 
MM1 $14,90 
SCS3 $295.00 



Specifications: 

Coverage: 
Sensitivity: 

Speed: 
IF: 

Increments: 
Selectivity: 

Audio: 

Power: 

Antenna: 

Display: 

Dimensions: 



lOOKHz - 2036MHz 

,35uVNFM, LOuVWFM, 

1.0AM/SSB/CW 

20 ch/sec. scan. 20ch/sec, search 

736.23, (352.23) (198.63) 45.0275, 455KH2: 

50Hz and greater 

2.4Khz/-6db (SSB) 12KHz/-6db 

(NFM/AM) 

L2 Watts at 4 ohms 

Input 13.8 V. DC 500mA 

BNC 

LCD 

3 1 /7H x 5 2/5W x 7 7/8D Wt, 21b lOoz. 



To Order Call 1 • 800 • 445 • 7717 

In All 50 States and Canada. 24 Hours a Day. Fax Orders: 1-800-448-1084, 24 Hours a Day. 
ACE Communications Monitor Division 10707 R 106th Street Fishers, IN 46038 

Int'l Voice* 317-842-7115. Int'l Fax* 317-849-8794 

Service and Support Lines: Mon-Fri 9a.m. to 9p.m., Saturday 10-4. EST 

MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Checks, Approved P.O/s. & CO.D. (add 5,00) 

Prices ana specifications subject to change. 



CIRCLE 164 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



Number 31 on your Feedback card 



DXpedition Lessons from 
Peter I and Bouvet Islands 

Helpful hints for your next exotic radio operation. 



by Roald Steen AJ0N/LA6US 



Few amateurs have as much experience in 
arranging DXpeditions to difficult loca- 
tions as Kaare Pedersen LA2GV and Einar 
Enderud LA1EE. In January 1987 this two- 
man team of Norwegian DXpeditioners were 
the first ones to put 3 Y2 , Peter I Island , on the 
air. Two years later, they conducted another 
memorable DXpedition, this time to 3Y5, 
Bouvet Island. The Peter I Island expedition 
of LA1EE and LA2GV resulted in 16,000 
contacts with 112 countries; the Bouvet Is- 
land expedition of LA1EE, LA2GV, F2CW, 
HB9AHL and JF1IST resulted in a total of 
47,000 contacts with hams on all continents. 
I met with Kaare and Einar in November 
1990 at Einar* s spacious hilltop home in an 
Oslo suburb, and talked with them about their 
DXpeditions to Peter 1 and Bouvet Islands. 
Their experiences in planning and conducting 
these two difficult DXpeditions can be a help- 
ful guide to other groups of hams that may be 
planning DXpeditions to DXCC countries 
that are hard to get to. 

Plan Ahead 

Einar had Arctic experience from serving 
as the manager of a satellite communications 
facility on the Svalbard Islands, north of Nor- 
way, before embarking on the first DXpedi- 
tion to Peter I Island. His knowledge of Arc- 
tic conditions was an important asset during 
the expedition planning. 

Concern for the weath- 
er and the seasons must 
be part of the planning 
for an expedition to a re- 
mote island such as Bou- 
vet or Peter I, Einar ex- 
plained. Peter I Island is 
covered with fog during 
much of the year, so even 
a helicopter may be un- 
able to land there much 
of the time. In the far 
south, you must plan 
your DXpedition for the 
northern winter to avoid 
the severe weather that 
much of this part of the 
world experiences dur- 
ing the southern winter. 

Most of all, if you 
would like to arrange a 




Photo A. Jocky F2CW t Einar LAIEE, Jin 
JF1IST, Kaare LA2GV and Willy HB9AHL 
aboard the M/V Aurora. 

DXpedition to a remote uninhabited island, 
you will need funds. A DXpedition to an 
inhabited tropical island in the Caribbean or 
the Pacific may not cost much more than a 
regular vacation, but an uninhabited island is 
likely to lack all infrastructure such as roads, 
shelters, airport and utilities. 

In common with a few other rare DX coun- 
tries, Bouvet Island and Peter I Island are 
both completely uninhabited. Once you are 
dealing with an uninhabited island when plan- 
ning a DXpedition, everything becomes 
much more expensive and complicated. As 
uninhabited islands, both Bouvet and Peter I 
are without service by any airline. If you 
would like to operate from an uninhabited 




island like 3Y2 and 3Y5, you must arrange 
your own transportation, and this can be far 
more expensive than flying to your destina- 
tion as a passenger on a commercial airline. 

Getting There 

The Norwegian polar vessel Aurora trans- 
ported Einar and Kaare during their Bouvet 
and Peter I Island expeditions. The Aurora is 
equipped for polar voyages, and has a crew 
which is well experienced in navigating in 
polar regions and in dealing with severe 
weather conditions. 

On an uninhabited island, all of the ameni- 
ties which you are used to are missing. Since 
there is no electric power, you must bring 
your own generator. Fuel for the generator 
must be brought onto the island, for you will 
not find a fuel dealership on an uninhabited 
island, 

Bring Plenty of Supplies 

And there are other problems. You must 
bring your own food for the duration of the 
stay, You may even have to bring your own 
water or desalination equipment. 

Once you finally get there, landing on Bou- 
vet Island or Peter I Island can be a challenge. 
There are no docks or natural harbors on 
either of these islands, so landing must be 
done by helicopter. But, in order to be able to 

get off the island if the 
helicopter should mal- 
function or if visibility 
should become too low 
for safe helicopter evac- 
uation, there must also 
be a way to get off the 
island by boat or rubber 
raft in an emergency, 

If Kaare and Einar 
should have been unable 
to leave Peter I Island by 
helicopter, they would 
need to use some moun- 
tain climbing techniques. 
They set up their station 
on top of a glacier which 
could only be descended 
with the help of ropes 
and mountain climbing 
gear. Peter I Island has 



Photo B. The inhabitants of Bouvet Island are elephant seals and penguins. 



few sites that are suitable 



46 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 



ATV CONVERTERS • HF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS 



DISCOVER THE WORLD OF 
FAST SCAN /^ ..TELEVISION 

70 CM 




HF AMPLIFIERS wr MOTOROLA BULLETiWS 
CorrtottU F«u Lljt far HF Amplifier* Dtitrifatd 



in thn MOTOROLA Bulletin* 



iiCM 



AMATEUR TELEVISION CONVERTERS 

A TV! 420-4Sa~ Mi-05 Kil 

ATV3 «0-45Q jGiAS-fET) M9»S Kii 

ATV* 902-928 JG«A£-FETf • 59 9$ Kii 

AIJgjQ SQUELCH CONTROL for ATV 



AN7H3QQW 1160.70 
AM763 1UW 8 Q3.2S 
AMTrOL JDW IU./B 
AN779H aOW lU.lt 
AH31J1HW 1403.00 



EQ63 HOW t tt.bS 
EBZ7A 300W «11T20 
EB1D4 400W tUMi 
AR3Q5 30OW 1 3*}. 5 7 



ML 

2 METER VHF AMPLIFIERS 

ISWm^tnlil 3S5A.,, 

7S Win Modtl S75A 

Aviillblc in Id; rx wircd/lratcd 



t 39.9S Kil 



WEWn IK WATT 3-SE MHi AmptilUr 

1 ■ 

POWEK SPLlTTiRS -"d COMBINERS 

7-JOMHi 

bQD Will PEP?-Pnrl. , 16QH 

1040 Watt PEP 2-Port -.„.. ,. I 7S.8S 

1200 Walt PEP A- Port f IB.flS 



.1 7ttttS Kit 

.Ill».« Kit 



KEB6T— PK fKJl] , SIM.9S 

UEB67— PCBIPCBCiMd) .... .,,.,,,, S 1#<W 

Nt£flb7-1 ptni»l| $ £03 

For detailed information and pricti, call ot write far our free c*ulc[. 



UMIVERSAL DIG3TAL FREQUEN CY R|A?QMT 

TK - 1 [ W if*d /t riled) , .7. *H».M 



tfEAT SltiK MATERIAL 

Model 94 Hepi $ink|«.Sjil2ji],6| I 1200 

CHS -ft Cppper Spr**d*r|6x6xl /*} | 1 B 00 

We aUo flock Hard— la— Find parti 

CHIP CAF3-K«mrt/ATC 

METAL CLAD MICA CAPS-Urwko/Semco 

RF POWER TRANSISTORS 

MfNl-CFRCUIT MIXERS 

SBL-1 U-&DQM1) I 6.5D 

SBL-lX (1D~1000MiI... , » 795 

ARCO TRIMMER CAPACITORS 

VK300-2D/4B RF Choke.,.. ....I 1,20 

S6-&0D-6I-3B FWrrte Bead t .IV 

SfQidbend HF TreniformerB 



Add ■ 3 50 for ihipppnf and hBndlinf. 







lommunication 
ioncepts Ina 

50fl Mill .tone Dmc * Xama, Ohio 45355 * (513) 426 -S6Q0 
FAX 513^429-3611 



CCI 




rf* 



****** 



» ^BjJ * 



o^ v 



ONV SAFETY BELT CO. 

P.O. Box 404 • Ramsey, NJ 07446 

800-345-5634 
Phone & FAX 201-327-2462 



ONV Safety Belt With Seat Harness 

$89.95 

OSHA 

We Ship 

Worldwide 

Order Desk Open 

7 Days/Week 

ONV Tool Pouch $15.95 
Add $4.00 For Handling VISA M/C CHECK 



ONV Belt W/O Seat Harness 
$74.95 



Cm CLE 102 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 99 ON READER SERVICE CARD 





Chassis Kits 

Cabinet Kits 

Assembled Cabinets 

Slope Box Kits 

UHF&VHF Antenna 
Power Divider Kits 



Rack Shelves 
Rack Equipment Cabinets 
Antenna Grounding Kits 
Tower Mounted Box Kits 

Other enclosures 



Small sheets Aluminum and Brass 

Charles Byers K3fWK 

5120 Harmony Grove Road, Dover, PA 17315 

Phone 717-292-4901 

Between 6PM end t;30PM EST* Eves. 



CIRCLE 222 ON REAPER SERVICE CARD 



MADISON 
SHOPPER 



ORDERS: 1(800) 231-3057 

1 (71 3) 729-7300 or 729 8800 
FAX 1(713) 729-4766 

New and Used Meters, 

Tubes, Transformers, 

Filter Capacitors 

And More 

FREE List Call 




Mailer Card . 



RACK AND CHASSIS BOXES 




RACK BOXES 





IUHH1 


I- 


c 


PRICE 




iflus 


1.75 


5 


EZ9 O 




1ftU7 


1.75 


7 


31.50 




lRUlfl 


1.75 


ID 


33 eo 




2RU5 


a.5o 


5 


31 .W 




ZFKU7 


"1 s 


7 


33.60 




2PU10 


3,30- 


15 


35.70 




3flU5 


5.25 


5 


3H.9Q 




3HU7 


6.25 


? 


*2,0f> 




3RU1& 


£.35 


to 


44.1 a 



Madison Electronics 

12310 Zavalia Street 
Houston. TX 77085 



CIRCLE 25 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



F« ATOMS: 

EASY TO FASFKATE 

^HIPF'ED(FLAT> 

ALL MAfh PANELS ARE 

FLAT FFKLWF AND REAR 
ARE CLEAR BRUSHED 
ANOD1ZED TOP. 
BOTTOM ANP THE 
6ND PANELS ARE 
BLACK BRUSHED 
ANOOGiED- 



CHASSfS BOXES 

PfllC£ 



MCOLL 



rfC-* A. 
MC-2A 
MG-3A 
UC-4A 
MC-5A 
MC-fiA 
MO-7A 
MCBA 
MC-9A 



W 



Si 5 75 
17.95 
19.95 
17.B5 
19.9& 
£2.05 
1S^S 
22.0S 
24.15 



H"T SHOWN 



V!i>A / rWW FACTOR*. ON PREPAID CflCE^S SHIPPED LPS W <Xfl[> NO CHAH3E 
9ECOH3 DAY * R (1 don N£XT OAT AlH (MOD 

SESCOM INC 21 CO WARD DRIVE- HFNDERSON. flV U.S.A. 
89015-^9 (QHDE RS)8LX3- 634^3457 JTECHNICAL HELP} 
7Q2-&65-340Q FAX 702-565^828 



w 



CIRCLE 167 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



RC-1000 REPEATER CONTROL 



• • i'g'S- :'• f m 



»KSHkW- *SS:S- . iS*--- '¥■ 



^*^ii. 



' ^ ^J 



• Autopatch • Patch Re-encode Dialing 
* Reverse Patch • User Programmable CWID 

& Codes * Intelligent CWID * Remote Base 

• 3 Auxiliary Outputs * Complete Interface 

• Control Rcvr Input * Programmable 

Tallbeeps • DHV1F Decoder w/muting 
42 Page Manual w/Schematics 

Also - RIM 00: basic repeater control RC-10D0 Wired & Tested $239.95 

w/ Remote Base * User Programmable w/DTMF Optional Enclosure ; $59.95 






Micro Computer Concepts 

7Q69-G2 Taylorsville Road • Dayton, OH 45424 



513-233-9675 



VtSA 



CIRCLE 160 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Satellit 




DAN KBflXC-KIRBY KA&ZTS— LOUIS KAffllPN 
CHRIS N0VX-DENISE YL-MALINE XVL 
DOROTHY K60JPS-JOHW NGISUUB5W/UA4LAJA3A 



1-800-426-289t 



MMBM 




FT-TOOOD Deluxe HFWoptions 
FT-1 000 Deluxe HF 
^-767 GX Gen. CvgO<cvr 
FT-757 GX II Gen. c" \Xc\ 
FT-747GXGen. Cvg 

FT-736R A> 

FRG-8800 G' 

FT-290Ryil AH 

FT-6 

FT- 790 

FT-4700 2 

FT-5200 

FT-24 

FT-212RH2M 

FT-712 70CM 

FT-4702M/70CM 

FT-41TE2MFMw. 

FT-8lt 70CMFM 

FT-26R 2M FM 2W HH 

FT-76R70CMFM2WHH 



LIST 
4399.00 
33S9.ut> 
2068.00 

064.00 
822 00 

£279.00 






!^ 



10.00 
?9.00 
359,00 



CallS 
Calt$ 
CalES 
CallS 
Call$ 
CallS 
Call$ 
CallS 
Call$ 

:all $ 

"Call $ 

Call* 

Call $ 

Lall? 

;all5 
CallS 
CallS 
CallS 
CallS 
CallS 
CallS 




. 



*-:■ *• *i -*i "l ^ 



r^ f*S 



n n n n ZJZ- 



IC-7&I Deluxe HFw/scope 

IC 765 Gan. Cvg Xcvi 

lC'735Gen,CvgXcvi 

IC-725 Gen. Ct^ Xcvi 

IC^726Gen C 

IC-R7000 25M 

IC-P71AlOOkH 

IC-2 

IC-475A" 

IC-2410 2 

IC 

IC 

\c 

IC-223H 

ICW2A 

IC-24A 

IC-2SAT 2M wj 

IC-23A 2M mini HH 

IC-3SAT 220MHz w/1 

IC-4S AT 440MHz w. 

lC-4GAT440MHzw 



LIST 

6149.00 

2692,00 

1149.00 




449.00 



CallS 
CallS 
CaJIS 
Cail$ 
Call* 
Call$ 
CallS 
Call $ 
CallS 
Call$ 
CallS 
talis 

CallS 

CailS 
CalE* 
CallS 
CailS 
CallS 
CaltS 
Call S 
CallS 




AUNCO 



AEA 

Astran 

Bench 

Butternut 

Cushcr 

Daiwa 

Hustler 

Kantronics 



Plus more 



ELECTRONICS INC. 

KLWI/Mirage 

keview 
arsen 
FJ 
R.F. Concepts 
Sony 
Vibfoplex 
Comet 
Thanks for your support. 





1-800-426-2891 
ElWETRO: (612)786-4475 

2663 County Rd . I 
Mounds View, WIN 55112 

Super Minnesota Watts 1 -800-279-1 503 



CIRCLE 153 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 47 



for access even by helicopter, and the glacier 
site turned out to be the most convenient site 
on the island. 

For shelter, Kaare and Einar brought tents 
that were built for use in polar regions. These 
tents have special insulation between two lay- 
ers of fabric to keep the cold out. 

A Well-Equipped Station 

The Bouvet Island expedition was well 
equipped with radio equipment. In addition to 
Kaare and Einar, the operator team consisted 
of Jacky F2CW, Willy HB9AHL and Jin 
JF1IST, The guest operators also helped in 
raising funds for the expedition. During the 
Bouvet Island expedition, the considerable 
inventory of radio equipment included four 
triband beams, three Butternut HF-6V verti- 
cals and a W0CD Battlecreek Special antenna 
for 40, 80 and 160 meters, and five trans- 
ceivers. 

Even a portable computer was included to 
assist in logging. Some interference between 
the five stations on Bouvet Island was in- 
evitable, since the separation between each 
station was smalL By planning the bands to be 
used by each station to limit interference* and 
by using antennas with vertical polarization 
at some of the stations and horizontal polar- 
ization at the remaining ones, interference 
was kept at tolerable levels. 

Licensing 

Some rare DX countries are islands that are 
politically or militarily sensitive, perhaps 
with a host government which is not too 
friendly to amateur radio. Fortunately, the 
Norwegian government is friendly to ama- 
teur radio and docs not consider these remote 
islands under its administration to have any 
strategic value. Reciprocal operating agree- 
ments exist between Norway and most coun- 
tries with a large ham population. 

It is even questionable if the Norwegian 
government could deny anyone permission to 
land on Peter I Island, since this island is so 
far south that it is covered by the Antarctic 
Treaty . The Antarctic Treaty includes guar- 
antees of free access to the continent and the 
islands that are covered by the treaty to any- 
one, regardless of nationality. 

The Norwegian government has turned 
Bouvet Island into a natural reservation due 




I 




V 



Sfe 




Photo C. Erecting a triband yagi on Peter I 
Island. This was the very first radio operation 
from this island near the Antarctic continent. 

to its unique nature and wildlife, mostly com- 
posed of elephant seals and penguins. There- 
lore, it granted Einar and Kaare permission 
to land on the island provided that they left the 
island as it was when they arrived there. All 
garbage and equipment had to be removed 
when the expedition left Bouvet Island. 

Mutual Benefits 

But the DXpedition was asked to leave two 
artifacts on Bouvet Island. One is an automat- 
ed weather station, which sends its reports 
through a French communications satellite 
system. The weather station, which is not 
solar powered, has batteries that are designed 
to last for three years . A plaque of Lars Chris- 
tensen, a Norwegian ship owner who fi- 
nanced the expedition which claimed Bouvet 
Island on behalf of Norway in 1927, was also 
left behind, mounted on a large rock near the 
camp on Bouvet Island. 

An amateur radio operation can provide the 
island and the host 



government with a great deal of publicity. 
And this is the type of publicity which gov- 
ernments like, as ham radio is a peaceful 
hobby which conveys an image of advanced 
technology. An event of this type may also be 
attractive to corporate sponsors that are seek- 
ing publicity. Large corporations may be per- 
suaded that they can benefit from sponsoring 
a DXpedition with its image of advanced 
technology. 

Finding Sponsors 

Kaare and Einar utilized these forces dur- 
ing their fund-raising efforts for their two 
DXpeditions. They received funding from 
corporate sponsors in a number of countries. 
They also received contributions from the 
almost 1 ,000 amateur radio operators around 
the world that are members of Club Bouvet. 

A television crew followed the expedition 
to Bouvet Island and took more than seven 
hours of TV footage. This footage has been 
edited into television programs that have ap- 
peared on European television. Researchers 
from the World Wide Fund for Nature 
(WWF) and the Norwegian Polar Research 
Institute followed the Bouvet Island DXpedi- 
tion as paying expedition members. 

The Peter I Island expedition, on the other 
hand, was arranged by the Norwegian Polar 
Research Institute. Kaare and Einar partici- 
pated in that expedition as paying expedition 
members to set tip iheir ham radio operation 
on the island. 

If you are planning a DXpedition to a rarely 
visited location, revenues from television 
footage may help you balance the books. 
Kaare and Einar have not put their experi- 
ences into a book, being too occupied with 
their engineering professions in Norway, but 
a trip like this could also provide good materi- 
al for a book to earn some additional rev- 
enues. 

Remote DX Adventures 

It may help to be in good physical condition 
before you start out on a DXpedition to an 
uninhabited island. And last, but not least, 
you will need support from other amateur 
radio operators in the form of fund raising, 
QSL managers and a support organization, 
according to Kaare and Einar* 





Photo D, Einar LA1EE starting up the generator on Peter f island. 
48 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1992 



Photo E. The rugged campsite on Bouvet Island. The M/V Aurora can 
he seen in the background. 



I "''') 



c oU 



ntO? 









asDEK?? ooHA i 


^ '^ Wft\ 






are b^ 

ters 




*S3*re 



TtoGfiflt 



WOtb 



'***chq* at^s 









» r f 



■**>UT 






ade in the USA 






















M 


p 






t 

7 










^f 


k 







fc 




*n* ^ 










^^^- 








J *i 






I y 






















































Our Name says quality, service and dependability - 
Our customers agree I 

"The best part of the Optoelectronics LCD counters are their 
extreme sensitivity, their brilliant LCD readout that can be seen 
even in bright sunlight and the rugged construction allowing 
them to get banged around, but still continue to operate smack 
dab on frequency... Yours is the only counter which reliably gives us 
(at Radio School) an instant frequency readout with its rock-steady 
LCD digits featuring incredible 1Hz resolution." 
Gordon West 

Optoelectronics has satisfied its customers for over 18 years - 
See for yourself what countless 
others have already discovered! 




y% * 



s 7 mas 

encouraged 
by one of my 
readers words 
of wisdom, 
and bought the 
Model 2300. 
^"\]^^» / Your service wax 
^^\^y superb! After 

testing this unit I 
personalty feel that all serious 
radio enthusiasts should own an 
Optoelectronics Frequency Finder 3 
Ron Bruckman 
Radio Monitors Newsletter 
Gf Maryland 



FACTORY DIRECT ORDER LINE 

1 -800-327-591 2 

{305)771-2050 • FAX(305)77 1-2052 

5821 NE 14th Avenue • Fort Lauderdale, fl 33334 

5% Shipping Handling, (Maximum 510) U.S. & Canada, 15% outside 

continental U.S.A. In Flan da add 6% sales tax, 

Visa, and MasterCard accepted, 

CIRCLE 1 72 OH READER SERVICE CARP 



Modal 

Function 

Range 
Display 



8030 



3000 



2600H 



2810 



26 DO HA 221 OA 



2300 



Froq, Period Ffeq, Period 
Ratio, Interval Ratio. Interval 



Frequency Frequency Frequency Frequency Frequency 



10Hz- 

10 Digit 

LCD 
vWFunction 

Annunciators 



RF Signal 16 Segment 
Strength Adjustable 
Indicator Bargraph 

Hold Switch Yes 



Price 



$579 



1GHz- 
3.0GHz 

10 Digit 
LCD 

w/F unction 
Annunciators 

16 Segmenl 

Adjustable 

Bargraph 

Yes 

£375, 



1MHz* 
30GHz 



10 Digit 
LCD 



16 Segment 

Adjustable 
Bargraph 

Yes 

$325, 



10Hz- 
30GHz 



10 Digit 
LCD* 



1MHz- 
3.0GHz 



10 Digit 
LCD 



10Hz- 
2.4GH/ 



8 Digit 
LED 



1MHz- 
2.4GHz 



B Digit 
LED 



Yet 

$259. 



Yas 
$225. 



No 
$179. 



Yes 



San&ovity: <t KKlOrnV rypcaJ Tpmeefeser 1 pom i±20pm add Si QO LCD MocWsoniy. Ncads & AC chan^r, adopter 
included except lor ?3O0. "For 2300, available with K Cad instated A AC ehwgsr/ adapter . oompiele pa c ka g e $ i 28 
A lull fin* of Antenna* Probes A Carry camm am sc4d iiuwiiry. (One year pans & labor warranty i 



Number 1 4 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Michael jay GeierKBlUM 



The Yaesu FT-26 
2 Meter Walkie 

Simplicity redefined. 



Yaesu USA 

17210 Edwards Road 

Cef ritos CA 90701 

(213)404-2700 

Price Class; $33O-$350 



Yaesu's new FT-26 is the successor to the 
company's venerable FT-23R series. It's 
an attractive little walkie that follows today's 
trend of making the cases thicker while reduc- 
ing the other dimensions. Its rounded, sculpt- 
ed shape feels good and fits nicely in my hand. 

First Impressions 

Although Yaesu's ads show the FT-26 with 
its standard 7.2-volt battery, the review unit 
was shipped wtth the optional t2-volt battery, 
making it substantially larger than it looks in 
the magazines. The radio itself is quite small, 
and the entire package is comparable to other 
small, modern walkies when the standard bat- 
tery is used. All the buttons are on the front 
and (eft side, making the rig easy to operate. 
The PTT/Lamp/Monitor switch is rubberized 
and rounded and has a very nice feel. The 
speaker produces very good audio for a radio 
this size, it blows away the audio on my FT- 
41 1 . The LCD resembles the one on the '41 1 , 
but the new one is larger and significantly 
easier to read. Like the '41 1 , this one shows all 
six digits of the operating frequency, including 
a real zero at the end. It's great. I wish the 
other manufacturers would go back to this 
system, The LCD and the keypad buttons are 
lit with green LEDs. The lights can be locked 
on, which is nice for mobile operation at night. 
Also, they can be set to shut off a few seconds 
after the last button has been pressed, which 
is optimum for battery operation. Speaking of 
those buttons, there aren't many of them! In 
keeping with the advertised philosophy of sim- 
plicity, the radio only has nine buttons on the 
front and three on the side under the rubber 
cover. Sorry, there's no DTMF (Touch-Tone} 
pad. 

The top of the rig has the usual volume and 
squelch controls and antenna connector. 
Each has a rubber gasket to help seal mois- 
ture out, Also present are the mike and ear- 
phone jacks, of course, but there's an extra 
goodie here: a direct 12-voll input jack. You 
don't have to buy an adapter to slide on the 
bottom of this rig to use it in your car or as a 
base station; just plug your cable in and gol 
Nice touch. To complete the mobile picture, a 
slide-on covef is provided so that you can re- 
move the battery and still protect the connec- 
tor on the bottom. In this configuration, the 
entire radio is about the size of a microphone! 

50 73 Amateur Radio Today • May. 1992 




The Yaesu FT-26 2 meter walkie. 

But, if you do leave your battery connected, it 
will charge as you drive, That could be very 
handy on long trips. The rubber duck antenna 
is extremely stiff. Its rubber cover is not firmly 
attached to the BNC connector, and mine 
started to unscrew when I tried to remove the 
duck from the rig. This antenna could use 
some improvement. Finally, the rig comes 
with a belt clip, but no soft case. The cases are 
available as options, though. 

Lotsa Stuff, Easy to Use 

Although the radio is indeed simple to use, it 
does not skimp on features, save for one im- 



portant one (more about that later). In fact, 
there are some new, advanced capabilities. 
Let's see T you've got 53 memories which can 
be tuned like individual VFOs, Any memory 
can hold odd splits or independent TX/RX fre- 
quencies. There's one real VFO (the "dial*'), 
and there's a "call" memory which is ac- 
cessed with just one keypress. The rig also 
has built-in VOX, which is designed to be used 
with an optional headset. DTMF squelch and 
paging are standard. CTCSS is available with 
the FTS-17A tone board, but it's optional and 
the review unit did not have it installed, so I 
couldn't try it out. It appears to function in 
much the same way as the FT-411's, so it 
should be very easy to use, RF power output 
can be selected from four different levels 
when using 1 2 volts, for a maximum of 5 watts 
out. At 7.2 volts, three levels are available, 
with 2 watts being the highest. During trans- 
mit, the LCD depicts the power output by 
showing appropriate numbers of steps at the 
bottom (where the S-meter is during receive). 
Note that this is not an actual measurement of 
power output— it is just a display generated by 
the microprocessor On most walkies (which 
have only HIGH and LOW power settings) this 
is silly, but it has a purpose here, because it 
reminds you of which of the four steps you 
have chosen. 

The Automatic Battery Saver (ABS) has a 
new twist. It monitors your operating history 
and adjusts itself to the optimum saving ratio 
without your ever knowing about it! If you don't 
like that, you can set it manually for three 
different ratios, or you can turn it off for packet 
operation. 

The Automatic Power Off (APO) function 
lets you select from 10, 20 or 30 minutes and, 
of course, permits you to disable it. To save 
even more power, the BUSY LED, which lights 
to indicate that the squelch is open or the 
channel is busy, can be turned off, as can the 
musical keypad beeper. 

The Automatic Repeater Shift (ARS), which 
sets the offset for you in accordance with the 
band plan, can be adjusted to various re- 
peater subbands, as well as turned on and off. 
I surmise that this is used primarily for setting 
the radio to the subbands of different coun- 
tries. I can't imagine why you'd want to 
change it here in the U.S. 

For true beginners, the radio can be turned 



LOGic* 



S^AO^ 



J**, IbaiM, (k**, Iff 
l»lint:*VT7* Mn: M/flb NilEM t* 1I5W 



hi". 



»* 



m 



.n 



: 1h m: II j 

1DMW 



Vi iiS^'fw: -f.l 



frtfi 



f tw« :.**■: 



un 



■I 



Now more than ever! 

Many hams have select- 
ed LOGic for its many 
unique features, high 
quality, reliability, reasonable price, and superb support. 



LOGic version 2,12 features easy online tracking for any 
award, including 1010, WPX, and grid-squares, Muttitasks 
under Windows 3 or DesqView. LOGic II now features: 
•optional QSL route database with automatic cross-refer- 
ence -integration with HamBase and SAM "call book'' data- 
bases •automatic county logging from the J-Comm county 
database. 

LOGic Jr. is still only $39.00. LOGic It, which features con- 
testing, interface to most rigs, custom report writer, and 
more, Is only $79. For IBM, Amiga, and ST. Coming for Mac. 
Ask for free 1 0-page info pak. 

Hours; 

8AM-6PMM-TI1 

8AM-NoonFri 



Personal Database Applications 
26 1 6 Meadow Ridge Dr . , dept 7 
Duhith.GA 30136-6037 
V404-242-0887 Fax 404-449-6687 



TALK WITH THE KNOWLEDGEABLE PEOPLE AT 




UEMENT 

ELECTRONICS 



FEATURING AN EXTENSIVE LINE OF ICOM PRODUCTS 




ALL MODE HF 
BASE STATION 



$2399 



00 



• IC-765 



ICOM 



IC-12GAT 

IC-R1 

IC-R100 

IC-735 
IC-725 
IC-3SAT 
IC-726 



1.2 GHZ HT 

WIDEBAND RECEIVER 
WIDEBAND RECEIVER 

ALL MODE HF TRANSCEIVER 

ALL MODE HF TRANSCEIVER 
220 MHZ HT 

ALL MODE HF TRANSCEIVER 



$324.00 

$519.00 

$599.00 

$899.00 

$799,00 
$319.00 

$1089.00 




1000 S. BASCOM AVENUE 
SAN JOSE, CA 95128 

Call us at (408) 998-5900 

Since f933 



CIRCLE 132 ON READER 



CELLULAR TELEPHONE 
MODIFICATION HANDBOOK 




How are hackers making 
cellular phone calls for free? 

• Techniques for decoding & changing 
cellular phones 1 NAMS & ESNS 

• Where to buy programming devices 

• The "roaming technique" scam! 
- Chip supplier's phone numbers 

• Instructions on how to change phone numbers 
models 

• Cellular phone manufacturer's ESN codes 




on all 




Complete Manual only $79,95 
MO. or C.O.D, to 

SPY Supply 

7 Colby Court Suite 215 
Bedford, NH 03110 
(617) 327-7272 



Sold for educational purposes only 



CIRCLE 1 74 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Brainstorm Engineering 

2943 1/2 HONOLULU AVE- LA CRESCENT A, CA. 91214 

PHONE (818) 249-4383 FAX {818} 248-0840 

MULTI-MODE SR4 

SIMPLEX REPEATER 




POWER 

am 



*Arr 



MULTI-MODE 



S I MP LEX K E PE \ T F R 



Brainstorm 

ISO RIM, 



NO DUPLEXER NEEDED!* 



USE ONE RA DIO AND ONE SIMPLEX FREQUENCY! 



** 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
THE SR4 IS A FULLY SELF-CONTAINED. MICROPROCESSOR BASED. REMOTE PROGRAMMABLE 
CONTROLLER, CAPABLE OF OPERATING ONE OR TWO RADIO TRANSCEEVERS IN SIMPLEX 

REPEATER. SPLfT SIMPLEX REPEATER. DUPLEX REPEATER CONTROLLER. VOICE MAIL AND 
VOICE (Dei MOOES SEPARATELY OR SIMULTANEOUSLY, 



ONE RADIO SIMPLEX REPEATER 
DUAL RADIO SIMPLEX REPEATER 
CROSS BAND SIMPLEX REPEATER 
CROSS BAND DUPLEX REPEATER 



• DUAL RADIO SPLIT SIMPLEX REPEATER 

• DUPLEX REPEATER CONTROLLER 

• BIDIRECTIONAL DUPLEX REPEATER 
- REPEATER BACK-UP SYSTEM 



CROSS BAND SPLIT S3MPLEX /DUPLEX REPEATER • REMOTE LINK 
2 MINUTES & « SECONDS OF TIME • MOBILE EXTENDER 



VOICE MAI 



L • AUTOMATIC VOICE IDENTIFIER - AUXILIARY OUTPUT 



$399 



:.: 



s up 



"rvo Ou piano- n»d*d 104 frifflplei rsp*alBr iundiOftS 
" lor 'on* f*6v iiinpt«i f»p»»i»r* 



MASTERCARD - VISA ■ AMERICAN EXPRESS ■ DISCOVER 



CIRCLE 197 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 51 



into a channelized, CB-tike unit by selecting 
the "memory only" mode. In this configura- 
tion, only channel numbers, which corre- 
spond to memory numbers, are displayed. No 
frequencies, nothing! Also, most of the rig's 
features are locked out. TTiis might be useful 
for a true technophobe's first week of owner- 
ship but, beyond that, I don't see the point, 
especially since you must program the fre- 
quencies in first to use it! Perhaps it could be 
helpful for someone who is physically or visu- 
ally impaired. 

Basics 

The radio receives from 1 30 to 1 74 MHz and 
transmits from 140 to 150 MHz. Receive sen- 
sitivity is excellent and holds up very well out- 
side the ham bands. Selectivity is as usual for 
Yaesus. In other words, superb. When you are 
5 kHz off, you knowit. 

As I mentioned before, receive audio Is very 
good. The speaker has better bass response 
than most small rigs, which makes it sound 
much nicer, especially on male voices. It is 
reasonably loud for its size but, as you might 
expect, it can be hard to hear in a noisy car or 
truck. Of course, you can hold the whole rig up 
to your ear because it is so small Also, there 
are optional speaker/mikes, and even a new 
earpiece/mike which has a separate mike you 
clip to your shirt. 

The radio has all the usual scanning and 
priority functions, and it lets you shield memo- 
ries from the scan while still allowing you to 
hear them manually. You also may hide them 
altogether. The scan speed is about the 







FT-26 Specifications 




General 


Frequency Flange (MHz) 
Channel Steps 




RX: 130-174 MHz 
TX: 140-150 MHz 
5,10,12.5. 15, 20 4 25 kHz 






Standard Repealer Shrtt (ResetJaJjhj) 


600 kHz 






Emission Type 




03E 






Supply Voltage 




5S-16VDC 






Current Consumption 




Stand-oy (witti 1 -sec save) 
Receive 
Transmit (5W) 
Auto Power Off 


19mA 
190 mA 
ISA 
6mA 




Antenna (BNC Jack} 




YHA-17 Rubber Flex Antenna 






Case Size ( w!FH®-25) 




2 2k 4 6x 1.3m 
(55 « 116x33 mm.) 






W*iom(apprax. 1 w/FNB-25) 




8 lbs ; 360 g 




Hecewer 


Circuit Type 

Sensrtrvity (i 2 dB SIN AD) 

Adjacent Channel Selectivity 

Into, [modulation 

Audio Ouip ul(<@) 12V) 




Doubto-con version superheterodyne 

Seller lhan 0.1 58 uV 

Setter than 60 dB 

Better than 65 dB 

0.5W m 6 ohms tor 5% THD 




Transmitter 


Power Outpui 
Frequency Stability 
Modulation System 
Maximum Deviation 
FM Hotae 
Spurious Emissions 




5W w/FNB-27; 2W w/FNB-25 

Better than ±10 pom. 

Variable Reactance 

±5 kHz 

Better than ^40dB@ 1 kHz 

Batter than 60 dB below carrier 






Audio Distort ton # 1 kHz, w/3 kHz deviation 


Lees lhan 5% 






Microphone Type 




2-kllonm condenser 





fastest I've ever seen; it really zips through the 
band. 

Using It 

Because there are so few buttons, some of 
the more advanced operations require some 
arcane keypress sequences. Luckily, there 
aren't too many of them, and none is anything 
you will use very often. For everyday opera* 
ton, the radio couldn't be easier to use. While 
you cannot enter frequencies directly (be- 
cause there's no number pad), the rotary dial, 
in conjunction with the MHz step function, lets 



1691 MHz Weather 
Satellite System 

1691 MHz Hemt Pre-amp. 
model TS-1 691 -P .Amp $299 

1691 MHz Receiver 
model TS-1 691 -Recvr $450 

Decoder Board & Software 
model TS-VGA-SAT3 $300 

Decoder Board & Software 
model TS-VGA-SAT4 $399 

Low Loss (microwave) Coaxial Cable (65 ft) 
with connectors, 
mode) 1 691 -coax ass'y $55 

1691 MHz Loop-Yagi Antenna 
model 1 691 -LY(M) $99 

1691 MHz Loop-Yagi Extension 
model 169VLY-XTN $85 

Demonstration Disc (IBM-PC VGA compatible) 
of signals recorded from WX-SAT system. $5 

Shipping: FOB Concord, Mass. 
prices subject to change without notice. 




MLUlUlCtfllJ 




SI 



SPECTRUM INTERNATIONAL, INC. 
Post Office Box 1084, Dept. S 
Concord, Mass. 01742. U.S.A. 
Phone: (508) 263-2145 
Fax: (508)263-7008 



Say You Saw 
It in 73! 



WEFAX To The Max 




PC GOES/WEFAX 3.0 $250 



PC GOES WEFAX 3.0 is a professional fax reception sys- 
tem for the IBM PC it includes an AM/FM demodulator, 
software cassette tutorial and 325 page manauV Check 
this partial list of our advanced features 



Res up lo 1 280*800x256 

Unattended Operation 

Coloration 

Zoom. Pan, Rotation 

Contrast Control 

Tuning Ozonoscope 

Photometry/His tograms 



AFT Lat/lon Gnds 
Ortortai Predcftion 
Frame Looping 
PCX a GIF Export 
Grayscale Printing 
Infrared Analysis 
Variable IQC & LPM 



PC HF FACSIMILE 5.0 $99 



PC HF Facsimile 5.0 is a complete shortwave FSKfax 
system for the IBM PC. It includes an FSK Demodulator, 
software, 250 page manual and tutorial cassette. Call or 
write for a complete catalog of products. 



Software Systems Consulting 

61 S S. El Gamlno Real. San Clemente, CA 92672 
Tel: (7 14)498-5784 Fax:(714)498-0568 



CIRCLE 163 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

52 73 Amateur Radio Today * May* 1992 



you get where you're going without too much 
trouble. Most operation is from the memories 
anyway. Other than that, there's not much to 
tell. This is a basic, solid waikie. 

What's Up, Docs 

In many of my reviews, I've complained bit- 
terly about the incomprehensible documenta- 
tion. This time, though, there's nothing to 
complain about. The booklet is first rate. It is 
written in English and, except for a few in- 
significant typos, is about as close to perfect 
as I could hope for. Even the section on DTMF 
squelch and paging is easy to understand. 
See, it can be done. Also included are full 
schematics and a handy, wallet-sized cheat 
sheet. Nice job, folks. 

Oops. . . 

The DTMF squelch and paging modes re- 
quire both the sending and receiving of tones, 
so the rig obviously has a tone-generating 
chip inside, Despite this, you cannot make 
autopatch calls from this radio. Nor can you 
use it to control special functions on a re- 
peater. It can only send 3-digit codes, and only 
zero through nine. It cannot send the star or 
pound sign, All the new rigs (at least the ones 
I've seen) which have DTMF paging use the 
same threendigit, 0-9 scheme. Like the oth- 
ers", the FT-26*s inability to send the star and 
pound sign makes the selective catling fea- 
tures unusable through most modern repeater 
controllers, which will not pass the tones with- 
out prefixes containing the special characters. 
Of course, it works fine for simplex use and is 
especially handy at ham tests 

Conclusion 

I like this radio. It works well and keeps the 
"bells and whistles" to a minimum, or at least 
unobtrusive. If you need the paging or you are 
turned off by lots of programming options (and 
can live without autopatch), the FT-26 is for 
you. If, however, you need the CTCSS or auto* 
patch, check out Yaesu's gorgeous new 
FT-415, which I'll be reviewing very soon. 
Either way, Yaesu's got a walkie you're sure to 
love, 



CIRCLE 250 014 READER SERVICE CARD 



MULTIPLE REPEATER - LINK - REMOTE BASE 

CONTROLLER 

Fina lly ft controller that has solved control and audio interconnect problems between 
muttjpie radios Your radio system can grow to multiple sites and stretcn for Hundreds 
of miles * and yet any radio cart be fully controlled from any designated input 




Purt 1 



J»ort3 



P*rt4 



ft*tS 



KtiT £ 



Fort7 






♦ I2i 



luf.L I 



Ooplci 



Dsjrin 
LtakJ 



E_I 



MrwHrtr 

I 



I 



Bifrf 3 



T T 







RBC-700 Repeater 

1 Madid TH •.!*.« 


■Controller 

nl 






T . 










AutupuJctt 

luiiuui 




Vain itltmrl r? 


ASCII tn&crfact 


t'ron.1 PunH 
DTMFPad 



The RBC-7GD Rupcalcr Comrolkr is designed to support Repeater systems that require 
multiple melius cfifinccu-'d together at a site. 'ITic RBC-700 utilizes a true 7*7 audio matrix 
switch which allows several conversations, between ports at the same lime In the Illustration 
above the 733 model is supporting a Repeater, 3 Duplexed links to different sites, and 3 
Remote Bases. Using simple commands, a user could tic the Repeater and a Remote Base to 
one link, while the olher Links are communicating through your site, holding separate 
conversations. Or, connect all of the pons together - like a big party line JT 

Several models are available and are software cimfigur&Me to support up to 3 Repeaters, S 
Duplex* d { j nk v .i nti 4 Re mote Bases. A group o r clu b can *ta rt i* i t h the basics and expand their 
controller anytime by simply adding boards and software. Free software upgrades for one year 
after delivery. Finally, a real cumrrolJcr for the linked system operator ! 



Multiple |ndep*odeni Repeater contra] 

t p (o 5 Uupfctrd Links 

L p Id 4 difTerrnt Remotes 

Recorded Natural Speech Telemetry 

Programmable Macros 

Connect / Disconnect multiple Ports 

Internal Receiver S^nettb processing 



Baiy ht> icing 
Inierfrmted Aalopateb 
Eipand ai any time 
ProfrTajnmaMe Scfaeduier 
+ 1 <H to + Hy Supply 
Standard $2F Rack Mount 
Canl-Cage design 



PaJomar Telecom, lite. 

300 Enterprise SL Saite E * fcscondido.Ca. 92025 * (*l*> 746-W* * Fan (C19> 744-1(10 



CIRCL£ 294 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




AMATEUR TELEVISION 



GET THE ATV BUG 

Transceiver 
Only $329 

with 50 Watt 
D26 Amp $539 

Value + Quality 
from over 25years 
in ATV...W60RG 

our all in one box TC70-1d, ATV Transceiver, 
you can easily transmit and receive live action color 
and sound video just like broadcast TV, Use any 
home TV camera or VCR by plugging the composite 
video and audio into the front VHS 10 pin or rear 
phono jacks. Add 70cm antenna, coax, 13.8 Vdc and 
TV set and you are on the air - it's that easy! 

TC70- 1 d has 1 .5 Watt p.e.p. with one xtal on 439.25, 434,0 
or 426.25 MHz & properly matches Mirage D15, D26, 
D1 00 amps for 1 5, 50, or 70 Watts. Hot GaAsf et downcorv 
verier varicap tunes whole 420-450 MHz band to your TV 
ch3, Shielded cabinet 7x7x2.5". Req. 13.8 VDC @ ,5 A 
Transmitters sold only to licensed amateurs, for legal purpuses, 
verified in the latest Callbook or send copy of new license 

Call or write now for our complete ATV catalog 
including downconverters, transmitters, linear amps, 
and antennas for the 400, 900 & 1200 MHz bands. 



(81 8) 447-4565 m-f aam-5 :30pm pst. Visa, MC, COD 

P.C- ELECTRONICS TompnreoRC) 

2522- WG Paxson Ui Arcadia CA 91007 Ma H™n (WB6YS3) 



HAM STATION 

P.O. Box 6522 

220 N.Fulton Ave. 
Evans ville, IN 477194522 

Store Hours 

MON-FRI:8AM-5PM 

SAT: 9 AM - 3 PM 

CENTRAL TIME 



SEND A SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED 

(2 STAMPS) ENVELOPE (5ASE) FOR 
NEW AND USED EQUIPMENT SHEETS. 

WARRANTY SERVICE CENTER FOR; 
ICOM. KENWOOD. VAESU. TEN-TEC 

FOR SERVICE INFORMATION CALL 

(512)422-0252 
MONDAY - FRIDAY 



TERMS: 

PriMi Do Nol Include Shipping. 

Price and Availability Subject to 

Change Without Notice 

Most Orders Shipped The Same Day 

COO's Welcome 



Wi^M 



AEA 




PK- 232MB* MulU Mode Controller 


$314 95 


p C. Pakrarrii— iflM 


62.95 


COM PakralT— C 64 _,. 


71J5 


PK 86 RS-232 Packet Controller 


134.95 


PC Pakran 38 


44 95 


PCB-8S Packet Board— IBM 


164,95 


isopole 144—2 Meier 


54.95 


ALINCO 




OR-5991 2M/44QMHz Deluxe Mobile 


S649-95 


Dfl-570T4iiW2M/35WLlHF 


5*9 95 


Qfl -110T45W? Meter 


29395 


OB -H9T50W2Meter 


349.95 


QU-F1 2M. SWHT 


CALL 


GJ-5B0T 2M/440 HT. 


399 95 


0J l62rODelun?M 1 HT 


229.95 


ALLIANCE 




HD'?3flolJlo/ 


$175.00 


AMERITRON 




Ai 8tl Itiree BiiA Tubes 


S579 95 


AL~80AtKWAmpiiJiar . 


974 95 


RCS 4V 4 Potion Wireless 


12995 


ASTRON 




ftS-»A16-Z0Amp 


$94 95 


RS35A 26-35 Amp 


144.95 


AS'ZOM J&-20 Amp */Mete^ 


114.95 


R5 3SM2tKftAfnp mf Meters 


159.95 


RS'SOM 3^-50 Amp w/ Meters 


229.95 


BUTTERNUT 




HF6VK6BandV«nioi 


S154.9S 


AIM? 17(12 Meier Kil 


36 50 


TBH150S160M 


54 95 


CS! 




800 New mi &r conned 


S309 9t 


P.P. VMullr-ModB interconnect 


479.95 



See 

M 



Us 



b3l 



53fl 



WffBitfl 



539 



54Q 



$169.95 
94*5 

$379 95 
31995 
369.96 

S134.95 
179,95 

$77.96 



COMET 

CA 2*4MAX 2M/440 4.S/T1 9 18'4" 

CA2?i4FX2M/440 4 5/2 2 5'11' 

CUSHCRAFT 

A4S HF Tfibandei 
ASSlDJ&^OMTribander , ,. 

R7 Seven flano Venical . . 

DIAMOND 

X-20O6/adb8.3'2M/44O 
X-5C0NA 8.3/11 7dDl7.2'2M/440 

HEIL 

Boom MIC Set (Wired) 

ICOM 

IC-765 Gen Co* Xcvr /PS/Tuner CALL 

tC- 751 A Gen Cev. Xcvr CALL 

tC 735 Gen Cow Xcvr CALL 

lC-725 6en.Gov Xcvr CALL 

IC2410VHF/UHF45W/a5W ... CALL 

IC229H5TJWFM CALL 

IC-901 Ffcp OpOC CALL 

IC-W2A 2M/440 Handheld Xcvr CALL 

IC-P2AT 2. 5W ?M HandtKfd Xcvr CALL 

IC-2GAT m 2M handrieid Ret CALL 
IC-2SRA 2U HT w/50ltH2-9O5MHz XcVf CALL 

KANTROHICS 

KAM All Mode 

Host Master Ji (PC) 
KPC ? PscKer Coniroiter 

KENWOOD 

1 S 9MSDX OeJ tin Digital Xcvr 

TS 650SAT Xcvr ^/Receiver, Tunc 

TS-450SAT Compacl Xcvr 

TM-M1A50W. 2M/440MHZ 

TM-641A 2M /220MMz. FM Xfivf 

IM ?41AE?0W, 2M r FM, HT . , 

LARSEN 

2M, ^40 MHz Mag Mount Antenna . 



$279 95 

59 95 

159 95 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 

CAU 
CALL 
CALL 



$62.95 



MFJ 

989C 3KW REP Antenna Tuner 

986 3KW PEP Antenna Tuner . 
949 D 300 W Mttf DL/ Switch/ Bin 

207HFSWRAnaJyzef 

4228 Keyer/Paddte Combmalron 
815B 1. 6^30 MHz RMS/PEP.. 
1214 Color Fax. RTTV, CW. ASCH 
1278T Turbo Mjlti-ModeCntr 
1278 M uJti- Mode Controlter 

i274PachelControl[er 

127QBTAPRTNC-2 Clone 

247 S WR Analyzer W/ F req Cou (iter 

RF Concepts 

7 23 2/30 W 2M Amp w/ Pre amp 
?3l7 30/l7QW2MAm D 
4 1 10 10/100W 440MHz Arno 
2/70G 3/30 5^20W 211/440 Amn 

STANDARD 

C228A 2M/220 MHi HT w/CTCSS 
C52BA 2M/44CMH7 HT w/CTCSS 
C16SA 2M Sub-Mini EMuxe HT 

T£«-TEC 

Ottwi-VI Nf* HF w/pSP 

YAESU |LAR6£STDCK-PL£ASE 
FMQ00D 200W Deluxe HF Xcvr 
FM000 200WHF^C¥r 
FT990100WHFXcvr 
FT -890 High PertoFmance HF Xcvr 
F V 767 Gen Gov Xcvr /PS/ 1 uner 
FT-757GX II Gen Gov Xcvr 
FT-7476X HF Xcvr 

FT-736R Xcvr 144-148. 430-450 

FT&200 2M/440 50/35W 

FT-2400H 2M 50W 

FT-415Delu*2M,HT. 



$299,95 
254 95 
13495 

B9J5 
124 95 

59 95 
149 95 
309 95 
244 95 
143.95 
124 95 
169 95 



$119-95 
244 95 
32495 
234.19 



$544 95 
524 95 

345 95 



CAU 



CALL) 



- - - r i 



CALL 
CALL 

CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 
CALL 



ORDERS & PRICE CHECKS 

800-729-4373 

NATIONWIDE % CANADA 



LARGE STOCK OF USED EQUIPMENT. 



LOCAL INFORMATION 

812-422-0231 

FAX 812-422-4253 



CIRCLE 131 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 S3 



Homing in 



Number 1 5 on your Feedback card 



JoeMoelLP-E,.K0OV 
PO Box 2508 
Futierton CA 92633 

School Days and 
Dual-Band J's 

Whether you are a new ham or an 
old-timer, a tecbie or an appliance op, 
radio direction finding (RDF) contests 
can add to your ham radio fun More 
and more clubs are adding these 
events, often called hidden transmitter 
hunts, foxhunts, or T-hunts. to their 
monthly calendar of events 

Everyone says that we need more 
young people in amateur radio. So why 
isn't everyone making belter use of an 



Radio Direction Finding 



100 students total, is in a rural area 
near the Texas border. Don has made 
amateur radio an important part of his 
physical science class. A dozen teens 
are now proud owners of ham tickets 
(see Photo A) 

"My kids are more enthusiastic 
about transmitter hunting than any oth- 
er radio activity, 1 ' Don told me. "Ordi- 
nary on-air QSO contesting bores them 
to tears They tike it at first, but they get 
burned out pretty quickly Teenagers 
need something more active, like fox- 
hunting ' 

The Turner High RDF program is still 
young, but holds lots of promise 
"Right now we're short on equip- 




Photo A. Turner High School students touift a "shrunken quad" to find elusive 
hidden transmitters. Left to right they are Andy Barthei KB5QNC f Gregg (no cat! 
yet). Rodney Btankenship KB50NB, and Wes Heareit NSOFA, (Photo by N5NDE.) 



unbeatable tool (foxhunting) for getting 
kids interested in our hobby? 

At the annual Science Extravagan- 
za, a hobby show put on by the Youth 
Science Center (YSCJ Of Orange 
County, California, we always have 
RDF demonstrations in addition to the 
usual HF/VHF/ A TV/OSCAR/ packet 
displays. Nothing else gets youngsters 
excited about radio more than "sniffing 
out" one of the two hidden Ts on the 
grounds, using the RDF gear we 
provide. 

fm not a schoolteacher, so I don't 
get to do this sort of thing regularly. To 
my dismay, I am finding that far too 
many non-ham educators are fearful of 
science and ignorant of ham radio, 
( YSC is try ing to change that ! ) 

All the ham operators who teach in 
my school district can come up with a 
dozen reasons why they carVt use am- 
ateur radio in their classrooms. So I am 
thrilled to read of educators like 
WB2JKJ and WB2MGP who are using 
it in spite of the obstacles But it can be 
even better when T-huntmg is part of 
the ham radio curriculum 

Sooner Scholars 

Don Loving NSNDE is a science 
teacher in Burneyville, Oklahoma. 
Turner High School, which has about 



menl," N5NDE reports, "I have a cou- 
ple of kids assigned to building a 
Doppler set, and we have obtained the 
money tor parts. 

"My kids prefer to be the fox. The 
adults and anybody else who wants to 
come out can try to find us We have 
already had one walking hunt and one 
driving hunt," 

Support from the ham community 
would be a big help to a program tike 
this. t4 We ined to have a couple of con- 
tests at the local tiamfesls." Don says, 
"At the one at Oklahoma City, we only 
had a few people show up, one from 
Texas. We had a good time but we only 
had three or four people that hunted. 

M We don't have any ham clubs close 
by. There is a repeater within range, 
and we talk it up on that- Mostly we 
have to go to hamfests that are a cou- 
ple of hours away 

Don's plans for the future include 
using RDF for search and rescue 
{SAR). He would like lo run an SAR 
Explorer post, "We had a small four- 
passenger plane crash a lew years ago 
that affected the whole community," 
he says "Hams were out searching for 
the plane. That brought up the idea of 
SAR m these kids' minds, because 
they all lost some friends/' 

We need more hams like Don Loving 



in education How about setting up a 
foxhunting program for your school 
system? Lack ol RDF experience is no 
excuse — NSNDE didn't have any when 
he started, either. Here is an opportuni- 
ty for the teacher to learn along with Ihe 
students . 

You're Never Too Old 

Don't get the idea that RDF contest* 
ing is just for kids The dozen T-hunts 
every month in Southern California 
bring oul fun lovers of all ages One 
perennial participant is Milt Ronney 
WAGFAT (see Photo B). Milt celebrates 
his 80th birthday this year. He started 
T-hunting in the 1950s and has never 
grown tired of it. 

In his 35 years of 2 meter DFing. Mill 
has followed technology, going from 
an AM "Gooney Bird" to the newesl 
imported rigs. He was part of the hiding 
team lhai set Ihe record for longest 
distance 2 meter hunt (252 air mites). 
He is also a regular on Ihe monthly 6 
meter hunt. 

Put a hidden transmitter on the air 
and chances are Milt wilt come out to 
find it. That is, he wiil if he is not enjoy- 
ing his other hobby— square dancing 
with his wife Elizabeth. 

A Black Box That Talks 

Clever "foxes" like to conceal their 
transmilter/anienna setups in out-of- 
the-way nooks and crannies, then talk 
through them remotely. One easy way 
is to use a dual-band VHF/UHF trans- 
ceiver that has been modified for 
ctossband repeat operation, {informa- 
tion on such modifications is often pro- 
vided by manufacturers and dealers,) 

A typical example is the 2 meter hum 
that WA60PS and I put on for the Or- 
ange Counly (California) RACES 
group last November, It was intended 
to be a relatively easy nighttime train- 
ing exercise, but we wanted to give the 
contestants something unexpected 
Most of them were new to the RDF 
scene. 

I put my IC-32AT 2 meler/70 cm 
handheld and a 20 amp-hour 12 volt 
battery in a box. painted black We con- 
cealed this fash up in a bush, a few feet 
off a dead-end road in Anaheim Hills 
We parked our van a couple of blocks 
away in a good spot to view the bush, 



but where we could not be seen from 
the dead end. 

Hunt time came r and we began our 
regular voice transmissions on 446 
MHz f repeated onto the 146 MHz hunt 
frequency by the concealed dual- 
bander. It took Ihe first team about an 
hour to DF up to the road end Not 
seeing anyone talking into a micro- 
phone, they drove off and were not 
seen again for another hour. Team ar- 
ler team did the same thrng, or else sat 
there, peering at the dead end, expect- 
ing to see us crouching in the bushes. 

After lots of encouragement from us, 
most of them got oul their flashlights 
and beat the bushes lo find the black 
box These fledgling hunters won 1 ! 
soon forget the lesson l hey learned 
Follow your RDF gear and expect Ihe 
unexpected. 

"Homing In" readers around the 
country have totd me o' the fun they've 
had using dual -banders as remotely 
operated foxes. Mobile dual-banders 
usually have separate antenna con- 
nectars for each band, but the single 
antenna jack on dual -band HTs can 
pose a problem. You need an antenna 
that is better than a "rubber ducky 1 ' so 
the hunters can hear you at the start 
point, but it has lo be effective and a 
good match on two bands. 

For the RACES hunt. I used a 2 me- 
ter J antenna Theory predicted it 
would work great, and it did. The halt- 
wavelength radiator of a 2 meter J is 
3^2 -wave lengths on the 70 cm band II 
does not have gam toward the horizon, 
but it works just fine for linking to the 
control point. The quarter-wavelength 
matching sect ton at the bottom is 3M> 
wavelength at 446 MHz, so it has the 
same transformer characteristics. 
(Such matching sections may be any 
odd multiple of a 1/4-wavelength.) 

I have used this J design on 2 meters 
lor several years, The J is an excellent 
antenna for public service and emer- 
gency work because it does not require 
a ground plane I mounted rt on a 1/2" 
Ihick plastic base, 8" x 8" . Wood works 
fine for the base, too You can set it just 
about anywhere (preferably high and tn 
the clear}, hook up the coax, and be on 
the air in seconds 

Figure 1 shows the dimensions. The 
elements are 1/8" diameter stainless 




Photo 8. When Milt Ronney WA6FA T hides ihe T. you never know what to expect 
This time, he is testing the "river effect*' on VHF propagation by setting up in the 
middle of Santiago Creek. 



54 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1992 



19 via* 



METAL 

SHORTING 

BAR 



2' 



JACK 




57 y J 



PtASTlC 
SPACER 

- bar 



I 



///f/////l//// 



Figure t This easy'to-build 2 meter J antenna also works on 70 
centimeters. See the text for element information. 



steel welding rods. Stainless elements 
are strong, flexible, and non-corrosfvs, 
but attaching them at the bottom is a 
problem. You may prefer to use brass 
or bronze rod rf you are not equipped 
to solder stainless steel or to drilt/- 
tap the shorting bar to accept the 
rods. 

The shorting bar at the bottom is 
mandatory, but do no! connect the bar 
to the rig's ground. For this hunt T I cov- 
ered Ihe elements with black electrical 



tape to make 
the antenna in- 
visible in the 
bushes under 
the street 
lamps. 

Center the 
coax connector 
between the el- 
ements. I 
prefer a BNC 
receptacle in- 
stead of (he 
usual SO-239* 
Clamp the wire 
leads from the 
connector to 
the elements at 
the points 
shown- You 
may need to 
slide the con- 
nector assem- 
bly up or down 
to achieve the 
best SWR. but 
both leads 
should end up at the same distance 
from the bottom shorting bar. 

The plastic spacer is important to 
keep the matching section elements 
parallel two inches apart, at all times I 
held my spacer in place with hot glue, 
but you could drill and tap the plastic 
for setscrews 

My handheld is happy with 2:1 
SWR, which was easy to achieve on 
both bands. With a little pruning and 
tweaking, you should be able to get 



f/2 1 



WOOD OR 
P1ASTIC BASE 



/ 



1,5:1 or better at 
your hunt fre- 
quency. 

A Store-Bought 
Alternative 

If you would 
rather buy a J 
than build one, 
consider the new 
Pocket RoiUJp J 
from MFJ Enter- 
prises, Inc.. P.O. 
Box 494, Missis- 
sippi State MS 
39762; (601) 
323-5869. The 
MFJ-1730 (see 




Photo C. The MFJ- 
easy to carry to the 
balun. 



Photo C) uses TV-type twin-lead for ihe 
matching section and radiator, it 
features a fernte choke balun to keep 
RF off the coax shield and improve 
the match. A 4-1/2' RG*58 pigtail 
with BNC connector goes to your hand- 
held. 

While it won't stand alone on a table 
like the antenna of Figure 1 1 the Pocket 
Roll-Up is much easier to transport. It is 
ideal for hanging from a tree or bush. It 
will support its own weigJii, but I would 
not recommend using it to hold up the 
ng. particularly if you use an oversize 
battery. The internal solder connec- 
tions may not withstand that much 
strain. Support the transceiver under- 
neath, use the belt dip, or suspend 
the ng with a separate piece of nylon 
line. 

In my tests, the J of Figure 1 and the 



1 730 Pocket Rot f -Up 2 meter J antenna is 
hiding site. The bulge is the ferrite choke 

Pocket Roil-Up gave equal perform- 
ance on both 2 meters and 70 centime- 
ters. Range was much greater than a 
quarter-wave whip in each case. My 
wattmeter measured 1 .3:1 SWR on the 
MFJ-1730 at the 146,565 MHz South- 
ern California T-hunt frequency, rising 
to 1.8:1 at 148 MHz and 2.4:1 at 144 
MHz, Lowest SWR on 70 cenli meters 
was 1.2:1 at the high end of the band, 
rising to 2.3:1 at 440 MHz, 

Even on an intermittent-signal T- 
hunt, the transmit duty cycle is higher 
than in a casual QSO. So give your NT 
some extra cooling help. I removed the 
belt dtp and boiled a 3" finned 
heatsink in its place for the RACES 
hunt. That was s uff ic ien i f or a 5 watt HT 
on a cool evening, but you may need a 
small 12 volt fan on a hot day, Happy 
hiding? 



DSP from J PS 



Hear how Digital Signal Processing can improve your reception! 



Use our new NF-60 to 

knock out 

heterodynes and tune-tips. 

The NF-60 is an automatic DSP 
audio notch filter that connects to 
the audio output of your receiver or 
transceiver and includes a built-in 
speaker amp. It automatically 
removes tones which last longer 
than a few milliseconds, so it knocks 
out Tune^Ups, CW and RTTY. Ifs 
not limited to removing just one 
tone as are standard notch filters. 



See us at 

Dayton 

Booths 639 & 646 

for 
Demonstrations 



Use our NIR-10 if you're 

troubled by more than just 

heterodynes. 

The NIR-10 is a Noise and QRM 
Reducer for SSB VOICE. This 
unique device contains white noise 
reduction, variable bandpass filter- 
ing and automatic notch modes. It 
reduces noise and removes hetero- 
dynes occuring in the presence of 
speech. Made possible by real* 
time Digital Signal Processing 
(DSP) using a 40 MHz DSP chip. 



NF-60 Introductory Price: $149.95. NIR-10: Still $395. 

For 1 15VAC to 12VDC Adapter add $1 2, Charge to MasterCard or Visa. Allow 1 week for personal checks. COD additional, 

We pay surface shipping in the Continental United States. NC residents add 6% sales tax. 

JPS Communications, Inc. TOLL FREE ORDER LINE 1-800-533-3819 

P.O. Box97757 Raleigh, NC 27624 Technical info 1-919-790-1048 FAX 1-919-790-1456 




CIRCLE 2S5 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 55 



Atv 



Number 1 6 on your Feedback card 



Bill Brown WB8ELK 
% 73 Magazine 
Forest Road 
Hancock NH 03449 

Wisconsin ATV Flight 

On December 7 t 1991 , a group from 
Hillsboro h Wisconsin, launched an 
ATV balloon with some interesting in- 
novations. I think you'll find some of 
these ideas of value for your nam 
shack or repeater Installation. 

The Package 

Gased on the successful flight and 
recovery of their previous voice re- 
peater flight, Joe Mayenschein 
WB9S8D and Tim Tomljanovich K9SB 
decided to risk a full video package on 
this mission. The ATV section consist- 
ed of a PC Electronics KPA5-RC 1-watt 
ATV transmitter (439.25 MHz) with an 
FIUA5 audio subcarrier board, a minia- 
ture B/W TV camera (similar to the one 
offered by both GBC Corporation and 
Micro Video Products), a Uniden 
Bearcat 1 0OXLT scanner and a 1 me- 
ter AM transmitter on 28.322 MHz (see 
the April '92 issue of Radio Fun, p. 18) 
with voice ID (see the November '91 
issue of 73 t p. 1 1 }. The antenna system 
consisted of an Olde Antenna Labs 
Mini-Wheel for ATV, a dipole for 10 me- 
ters and a Vd-wave whip for VHR 

In addition to the live ATV camera 
transmissions, they programmed the 
scanner to receive on two channels on 
2m FM. One frequency was the 'Tree- 
for-all ,r uplink and the other was a pri- 
ority channel for control of the mirror 
system and to make announcements 
from mission control. 

Anything heard on the 2m uplink was 
repeated down via the ATV audio sub- 
carrier as well as the 10 meter AM 
transmitter. In essence, this would be a 



Ham Television 

super-wide coverage crossband re- 
peater! 

Remote Camera Pointing 

Joe WB9SBD came up with a very 
inexpensive and effective method of 
remote camera pointing. Rather than 
move the entire camera around with 
servos , Joe mounted a motor-driven 
first-surface mirror in front of the TV 
camera at a 45 * angle. The first sur- 
face mirror (cat. #2741) is available 
from American Science Center; (70S) 
475-8440. Edmund Scientific is anoth- 
er good source of first surface mirrors. 

With two angled pieces of PC board 
material, Joe was able to suspend the 
rnotorrniirror assembly at just the right 
point above the camera. Viewed on 
edge, the two pieces of PC board in the 
field of view of the camera are hardly 
noticeable <see Figure 2). 

The motor-driven mirror rotated at 
0.5 rprn, giving them a continuous 
360° pan of the camera view every 2 
minutes. The motor (12 VDC at 0.5 
rprn) is made by Hankscraft and only 
draws 4 milliamps when operating, 
You can contact Hankscraft at (608) 
524-4343; a variety of operating 
voltages and rotation speeds are avail- 
able. If you plan to send one up in a 
balloon, be sure to specify a grease- 
less motor to handle the -60 a temper- 
atures in the upper altitudes. 

Joe and Tim added a Norcon touch- 
tone controller (model TD16 with 16A 
expansion module) which allowed 
them to turn the motor on or off by 
remote control. To change the camera 
view, they just activated the motor via a 
touch-tone sequence and waited for 
the mirror to rotate to the desired point. 
Keep in mind T however, that the image 
as viewed through the mirror will be 




Photo £L inside view of the payioad showing the 10 meter AM transmitter and 
voice ID circuitry. 



7.2 V 
LM317 



1/4-wave 



Ca 
rr? 



Micro TV 
Gamuts 



I 



Video 



i 



Ijtlle Wheel 
70cm Antenna 



ATV 

Transmitter 



SCANNER 
HCVR 



7?7 



37 



. . . . . ^ 

Audio Out 

-#■ 



511 



10 \ 

MEG^ 



J71 

10 ? 



^T*Bi2 



AufliQ 
In 



10 meter 
\7 Dlpuk* 



VOICE 
ID 



~X 



r AyfJiO OliJ 



Hr 



-^<V/v-+- 

io At 

MEG 



611 



A.Ut"lri> 

r- 



ltim AM 
Transmifler 



10 i^^l *- 

MEG j AyfJn 

<h f an ,n 

kudio At 



Audit! 
DistrihurifMi 
Board 1 



TOUCH TO^E 
ijh:ui>i k 



-£ 




2 Amp 
Fuse 



Mirror 
Mul'Or 



I 



15V 

6-Cdl 
Liltitu-m 
Battery 

P,Ml. 



Figure 1, Schematic diagram of the balloon payioad. 



reversed. Some TV cameras have a 
reverse scan switch which allows you 
to compensate for this effect. 

To identify their balloon ATV trans- 
mission, they mounted a thin strip 
alongside the edge of the package with 
their reverse image cailsigns. Since 
the camera focuses from 6" to infinity, 
this method of video ID worked very 
well during the flight. 

The Flight 

After a late night session of final con- 
struction and testing, the launch team 




Photo A. The completed payfoad showing the unique rotating mirror system. The motor turned a mirror (slanted 
45°) in front of the TV camera which provided a continuous 360* view every two minutes. The caff signs are 
reversed so they appear normal in the downlinked video as seen through the mirror. 



assembled near Joe WB9SBO's farm 
around 7:30 a.m.. After various Mur- 
phy isms (the N-connector on the re- 
ceive antenna fell off> the regulator on 
the helium tank wouldn't fit and there 
was intermittent video from the pay- 
load), everything somehow came to- 
gether. 

At 9:45 a.m„ the HBT-2 (Hillsboro 
Balloon Team) mission took off under 
near ideal ground conditions. Since a 
storm front had cleared out of the area 
a few hours earlier, visibility was excel- 
lent. Everyone watching the ATV 
downlink at the launch site was treated 
to spectacular views of the rolling Wis- 
consin farmland. The remote mirror 
system worked great The touch-tone 
system worked perfectly, allowing the 
contro] station to easily point the cam- 
era view at the horizon, at the ground 
below or even up at the balloon itself. 

Reports came rolling in via the HF 
net on 7.155 MHz (Scott ND9C was the 
net control). Just 1 minutes after take- 
off, Mike WB0QCD reported seeing P4 
pictures from Iowa. Soon afterwards, 
reports of neariy snow-free video re- 
ception came in from Ron WQZIH in 
northern Illinois and Andy N9AB and 
others in the Chicago area. One station 
even reported seeing P2 level pictures 
in Arkansas! Apparently there was 
some interesting ducting going on dur- 
ing the flight. 

Both the ATV audio subcarrier and 
the 10 meter AM downlinks from the 
crossband voice repeater system 
worked quite well. It was fascinating to 
hear distant stations describing their 
video reception on the 2 meter talk fre- 
quency. 

Treed 

Although the ground wind conditions 
were great, the upper level winds were 
another story. Since the jet stream 
winds were over 100 knots, it was de- 
cided to use a much smaller balloon to 
shorten the total distance traveled. 
This resulted in a short flight that made 
it just to 45,000 feet before the balloon 
burst. However, since the small bal- 



56 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



BAUOON 
PACKAGE 



uqubu SlMO 
PC& MATEfUAl 
/ SUPPORT 




12 VDC 
HOT on 
lflBPM 



STYROfOAM 
&LQC* 




AMATEUR TELEVISION 



Figure 2. Details of the mirror mount 

loon covered more than 60 miles in the 
45 minute ascent (average ground 
speed of 80 mph), the large balloon 
capable of reaching 1 00,000 feet in al- 
titude would 've dropped the payload 
some 1 60 miles downrange (right in the 
middle of Lake Michigan f). 

Since the balloon burst somewhat 
sooner than expected, most members 
Of the chase team were too far down- 
range. Through triangulation of beam 
headings and by watching for land- 
marks on the video signal (a large lake 
helped), the location of the landing site 
was narrowed (town to an area just 10 
miles east of Portage, Wisconsin, It 
was found 15 minutes alter touch- 
down, daring 40 feet up m a tree near 
the town of Rio (on the property of the 
Chief of Police). One brave soul scaled 
the dry. frozen, and relatively branch- 
less tree and safely brought the pack- 



Photo C inside view of the styrofoam 
package showing the Uniden Bearcat 
scanner (upper left), ATV transmitter 
(center, in shielded case/, back of TV 
camera (tower right), voltage regulator 
(upper right), touch-tone decoder (Sow- 
er right), fithium batteries (lower left) 
and the W meter AM transmitter (up- 
per left). 

age (and himself) back to the ground in 
perfect shape. 

Joe WB9SBD, Tim K9SB and the 
Hiilsboro group plan a number of fu- 
ture flights with a variety of intrigu- 
ing paytoads. If you'd (ike to find out 
about amateur radio balloon paytoads. 
Joe has started a BCAR (Balloon Car- 
rying Amateur Radio) net on 14.255 
MHz every Saturday afternoon at 3 
p m. Central time. Also check out the 
"Balloon*' area on the 73 phone-line 
BBS for the latest information. 





TVC-4G 
only $89 

SEE THE SPACE SHUTTLE VIDEO 

Many ATV repeaters and individuals are retransmitting 
Space Shuttle Video & Audio from their TVRO's tuned to 
Satcom F2-R transponder 13. Others may be retrans- 
mitting weather radar during significant storms. If it is 
being done in your area on 70 CM - check page 41 3 in 
the 91-92 ARRL Repeater Directory or call us, ATV re- 
peaters are springing up all over - all you need is one of 
the TVC-4G ATV 420-450 MHz downconveters, add any 
TV set to ch 2, 3 or 4 and a 70 CM antenna We also 
have downconverters and antennas for the 900 and 
1 200 MHz amateur bands. In fact we are your one stop 
for alt your ATV needs and info. Hams, call for our 
complete ATV catalog - antennas, transceivers, amplifi- 
ers. We ship most items within 24 ho urs after you calk 

(81 8) 447-4565 rn-f 8am-5:3Qpm pst. Visa, MC, COD 

P.C. ELECTRONICS toukwsorg) 

2522- WG Paxson Ln Arcadia CA 91007 Maryann (WB6YSS) 



PERFORMANCE 
AND VALUE 

WITHOUT COMPROMISE 



KRP-5000 
REPEATER 



Photo D, (I to r): Tim K9SB, Stuart WB9UNX t chase dogs (Biackte and Teddy), Joe 
WB9SBD and Brian KA9QJT prepare to launch the balloon. 






2 METERS-220-440 



Word is spreading fast 
Nothing match** (ha KRP 
lor iota! performance and value Not GE. not avan Motorola. 




Photo E. The recovery team after retrieving their prize from the tree. (I to r): James 
N9LKY, Jim N9KAN (behind James), Steve WB9ZRE, David KE9KX, Lennait 
KB9GDY, Brent Hughes and Ttm K9SB. 



CffiCl£ 144 Oft READER SER VICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 57 



Ha 



Number 17 on your Feedback card 



MS WITH CLASS 



Carole Perry WB2MGP 

Media Mentors, Inc. 

P.O. Box 131646 

Steten island NY 10313-0006 

Miami Tropical Hamboree 

Attending the Tropical Hamboree in 
Miami has always been a terrific expe- 
rience for me. This February, however, 
those hams and non*hams alike who 
came to assess the role of youngsters 
in the hobby were in for a real treat. 
Under the extremely capable guidance 
of Evelyn Gauze ns W4WYR. who is the 
General Chairperson of the event 
sponsored by the Dade Radio Club, 
Inc., hundreds of free passes were dis* 
tributed to local schools for children to 
be able to attend at no cost. The 
tremendous efforts and hard work of 
Evelyn and the club really paid off. Not 
only was the Hamboree a huge suc- 
cess , but the Youth Forurn which I had 
the privilege of moderating was well 
attended by children. Many parents 
came to the forum, too, but more im* 
portantty, the young people showed up 
to hear what their own peers had to say 
about amateur radio. 

As a teacher who deals with hun- 
dreds of children a year in my own 
school, I certainly appreciate and ap- 
plaud the efforts of the manufacturers 
to encourage youngsters to gel In- 
volved with amateur radio. We should 
all support the manufacturers who sup- 
port (he educational forums and pro- 
grams across the country. The main 
prize to be awarded to a young person 
in attendance was a Kenwood R2000 
wideband receiver. I wish everyone 
could have seen the look on the face of 
the little boy who won it J i was wonder- 
fur! (COM, Yaesu, and the ARRL also 
contributed door prizes, much to the 
children's delight. Ttie dedicated folks 
at MFJ and Heath have always been 
very supportive of my educational efforts 
with amateur radio. Special thanks must 
go to Rosalie White WAiSTO, educa- 



tional coordinator of the ARRL, who 
was a big help with the publicity and 
gathering of prizes for the Youth 
Forum. Rosalie also moderated the 
Instructors Workshop that weekend. 

The Youth Forum 

Well, 1 certainly had an outstanding 
group of crviidren to work with in Miami 
What a joy to have articulate, enthusi- 
astic young people volunteer to speak 
to a packed room of children and adults 
about their love of amateur radio. 
These youngsters are the future lead- 
ers of our hobby, and I'm so delighted 
to have been able to showcase them at 
the Hamboree, 



Lee's involvement in amateur radio 
was largely responsible for the self 
confidence and ease that we m the au- 
dience could easily see he possessed. 
MY next speaker Is no stranger to 
making public appearances. Sammy 
Garrett AA0CR, age 1 4 P is the winner of 
the Westlink 1991 Young Ham of The 
Year award. I've had the pleasure of 
working with Sammy before. He was a 
guest speaker at my Youth Forum in 
Dayton m 1991 and did a terrific job 
there also. In his talk, Sammy stressed 
that you don't have to be a nerd or a 
great brain to get involved with the hob- 
by. He said that any kid who really 
wants to get Into ham radio and have 
fun with it has a good chance to do it. 
He also cautioned the young people lo 
not let it consume their lives to the ex- 
clusion of other important young peo- 
ple's activities 



"What a joy to have articulate, enthusiastic 

young people volunteer to speak to a packed 

room of children and adults about their 

love of amateur radio. " 



Chris Hadden NftGXB was the first to 
speak. Chris is the 1991 recipient of the 
ARRL Paul and Helen Grauer $600 
Scholarship. Chris is a computer sci- 
ence major at the University of Ne- 
braska. He is actively involved in many 
different modes of radio commumca* 
tions and provided an excellent role 
model for the youngsters tn atten- 
dance* 

Next at the microphone was the very 
eloquent Lee Cicreszko N4TCW, 16 
years old. Lee made Quite an appear- 
ance dressed in his Police Explorers 
uniform. He was busy the whole week- 
end helping out with communications 
at the Hamboree. Lee explained his 
love of public service, working with the 
Sheriff's office and helping out at local 
public activities. He also was very 
adept at answering questions from our 
young audience about UHF, VHF and 
radio wave propagation. I'm sure that 



Mike Aboattista KD4COT is 1 3 years 
old and in the 3th grade He is a student 
of Phyllisan West KA4FZI, who has a 
wonderful ham radio program that en- 
courages less advantaged children to 
get involved with technical studies at 
Catoosa Middle School in Cape Coral, 
Florida. Mike showed us a simple, easi- 
ly assembled telegraph key made by 
youngsters in his class. Mike is also an 
active member of the Ft, Myers Radio 
Relay League. 

Everyone at the forum was totally 
captivated by Louis Zuckerman 
KD4HRD, who is a bright, vociferous 
3-year-old. Louis got his license in De- 
cember 1 991 , much to the delight of his 
fellow 3rd graders. Both mom and dad 
are very active in the Dade Radio Club 
of Miami. After meeting with this enthu- 
siastic ham family in Miami, It was obvi- 
ous to me that Louis is going to have 
many fabulous, tun years ahead of him 



in ham radio with his folks, Louis told 
the group assembled that he especially 
loves talking to radio operators in for- 
eign countries. He's already had a ter- 
rific QSO with someone in Japan 
named Hida JF1SEK on the day of 
President Bush's visit there. What an 
inspiration this youngster can be for 
Other children! 

Torben Bush KC4ZNI is 16 years old 
and attending Coral Gables High 
School He told us how he attended the 
evening amateur radio class taught by 
Harry Pilafian W4SOG t along with his 
dad. Torben helped form the Dade 
Young Amateurs Association. This 
group was formed so that youngsters 
could have their own organization un- 
der the supervision of adults. He is also 
a member of the South Florida FM As- 
sociation and the ARRL 

Derek Urwin KD40IF is presently in 
the 7th grade at Arvida Middle School 
and has his General license. Derek 
was in Audrey Pilafian KB4ZGU's gift- 
ed 6th grade class last year, He got 
interested in ham radio when Harry Pi- 
lafian taught several classes there. 
Both he and his father attended Har- 
ry's licensing classes in the evening. 
He too is a member of the South Flori- 
da FM Association and the Dade 
Young Amateurs Assoc! alio n, Let's 
never underestimate the influence thai 
a teacher can have by exposing young- 
sters to interesting, stimulating, and 
exciting demonstrations. 

Paul Kunicki KC4YWK is 14 years 
old and has a Technician license, Paul 
spoke eloquently about his move from 
CB to ham radio. His father is a ham 
radio operator also. He is an active 
member of the Dade Radio Club of Mi- 
ami and maintains the club station, 
W4NVU, 

Every one of these young presenters 
made a profound case for the advan- 
tage to all of us in recruiting bright, 
motivated boys and giris into ham ra- 
dio. Please be on the lookout tor articu- 
late and enthusiastic youngsters who 
would like to join me in participating in 
01 her youth forums. Have them get in 
touch with me; its a marvelous experi- 
ence for a young person. 



Sell your product in 73 Magazine Call Dan Harper & Louise 'Sullivan today 800*225-5083 




PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS 

It's easy to build PCB's. No camera or dark 
room are required. Alt materials, even 4 
drills, along with simple instructions to use 
magazine or other types of artwork are 
included- All 6 4"x6" boards are precoated 
with a strong easy to use dry film 

photoresist. For FREE simple, step by 
step, instructions and catalog or to order 

the CIRCUIT BOARD KfT ($45 00} 
call or write: Solder World, Dept M4 t 9555 
Owensmouth Ave. #14, Chatsworth, CA 
91311. {81 8) 998 0627 Fax (8 1 8) 709-2605 



CIRCLE 158 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



SPY ON THE EARTH 



See on your computer screen what 6 or 
more U.S., Russian and Japanese satel- 
lites see- Make money many ways. Makes 
a terrific science project. We manufacture 
and sell all the equipment you need. In 
business since 1956. 

For complete details dial our electronic 
bulletin board anytime. 300-2400 baud. 
Modem configuration: 8 bits, 1 stop, no 
parity: (718)-74r>3911. Voice 8AM-1PM: 
C718H68-2720. 

Or send S20 for fantastic 8 disk program 
set for your IBM-PC. 

Vanguard Labs 

196-23 Jamaica Ave., Hollis NY 11423 






BATTERIES 

Nickel-Cadmium, Alkaline, Lithium, 
Sealed Lead Acid For Radios, Computers, 
Etc. And All Portable Equipment 

YOU NEED BATTERIES? 
WE'VE GOT BATTERIES! 

CALL US FOR FREE CATALOG 



E.H.YOST & CO. 



7344 TETIVA RD 
SAUK CITY. Wl 53583 

(608)643-3194 
FAX 608-643-4439 




CIRCLE 1 14 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



58 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



Natural Voice Playback Board 




Repealer Identifiers 
Contest Stations 
Site Ala mis 
Remote Telemetry 
Weather Stations 
Multiple Languages 
Emergency 
An nou nee ments 



Data Voice ■ DV-64 

Add a Recorded Natural Voice to your system or equipment. 
Voice vocabularies or multiple phrases up to 1 minute in a 
Natural Voice is saved in Non- Volatile E-Prom memory. (If 
pxwens removed the recordings will riot be lost). We'll record 
you r me ssage ( s ) i n a male or female voice - or - you can record 
the library by using the optional SDS- 1000 development board 
on an IBM or compatible computer. 



Parallel Input Word Select 
500 ma Keylhte Output 
32 Kb sampling rate 
Multiple Modes 
3D sec - JO minute Timers 



8 ohm Audio output 
tiOO ohm Audio output 
+9v to + 14v Supply 
Size: 4.00" x 4.25" 
Connectors Included 



Price % 169,00 Single Qty (programmed) 

Palomar Telecom, Inc. 

300 Enterprise St, Suite E 

(619) 746-7998 



CIRCLE 139 Oft READER SERVICE CARD 



VHP UHF MICROWAVE PRODUCTS FOR ATV 

ATV LINEAR POWER AMPLIFIERS — 
PREAMPS— VIDEO SAMPLER: 

PA Bricks on P,a Boards $25.00 to $150.00 
Power Amplifiers 2 meters thru 1 .2 GHz (23cm) 
Outputs 1 .5W 7W 20W 35W SOW $55 to $1 79 

ATV Samplers (video) Use with video monitor 
and scope. Uses "N" connectors. Can be 
used thru 1.2GHz. with very low loss. A meter 
is included which gives a relative output level. 
This unit beats an on the air report. Three mod- 
els to choose from. 

$49.00 $60.00 $68.00 

PREAMPS especially designed for low noise and 

moderate gain. 144 MHz thru 2.4GHz. 
All products are warranted. See our flyer by 
calling or writing for a copy, 
2 mtr. PA & preamp. Kits available, $25 to $1 15 
PA outputs up to 60 watts with V2 watt input. 
ATV JNTERDIGJTAL FILTERS 439.25910.25 OTHERS 
SEE US AT OAYTON BOOTH #319 




210 Utica Street 
(716) 692-5451 Tonawanda, NY 14150 



CIRCLE 278 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



WHY PAY MORE TO GET LKSS? 

Nu uther "eiieni! ta&me program otters nittre* 



■ Scrolling log • View all records liic a toghook * Spreadsheet-style 
input ■ 4 world time clocks * Iambic memory keycr: 5-40wpra; 9 
mem. buffers; Macno keys; Prog. 5n; Standard & Farrwworth; Trans- 
puitnt opctiUiCin; Sw/adj. tone • 200 yr calendar • DOS shell * 
CLLStom colors * Contest modc/rtport * Personal database * Hot keys 
for multiple auio entries & functions * On- screen Help ■ CAT ton- 
trollcr • Prog, auto entries plus country * DXCC. WAS & user prog, 
awanis (racking * Rearnhearfings • Scrn, mcrrnj & notepad w/autodate 
reminder (keep track of skeds. etc. > • Instant lotik-up any item *QSL 
tracking * Prints labels, baler QSL reports & log- all or by sort * 
Modify any record » 10 min. timer * Much more. Includes documenta- 
tion & schematic for keyer interface. 

AUTOLOG PLUS ■ , $32.00* 

AUTOLOG PLUS (less keyer & CAT) $22.00* 

KEYER INTERFACE for paddle fcty . TX, and 

output forcfintrctLof fnurcKlcnlal devices «,»,.» $40.00* 

Universal CAT Interface 
• Works with all computer reatf> transceivers * Selectable t inverted 
rmi -invent) RXD & TXDdata I/O * Built into a DB-25 shell. Direct 
connection to computer eliminates the need for a DB 25 cable. 

CAT INTERFACE KIT . , $40.00* 

CATINTERFACE (assembled) $55.00* 

*For USA orders add $3 ship & handling for each item, (Outside USA 
$5) AZ orders rnusi include 5.5% state tas. Call sign required with 
log. For PC/XT/ AT 36CHt free any monitor— hard drive nw required 
but recommended for Autotog Plus PI^S- 5.25 & 3.5 in. floppies. 
Mole; CAT control is for Kenwood*" — others arc forthcoming. CAT 
com nil automatically disabled when transceiver tint detected. 



RAI ENTERPRISES, 4508 N. 48th Dr. 
Phoenix, A/ 85031 USA 



CIRCLE 270 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MORSE CODE 

MUSIC? 




Yes it's true! Now the morse code alpha- 
bat can be learned and enjoyed while 
doing aerobics, jogging, driving or danc- 
ing. Oder "THE RHYTHM OF THE CODE" 
cassette single hit today! 

Send $5.95 check or money order 
(please add $2.00 S&H) to: 



Fast & Fun G5RV QuicKits 



Productions 

wK P.O. Box319-ST Av 

jy Weymouth, MA 021 88 mfy) 

Mass Residents please add 5% sales tax 

Dealer inquiries welcome 



Ffit&Etn IftBvlEd 

* Tu'i-Sih vi fu -j I i b.? rniii i -~-b; 

■ E>-<ti\[ain£ indidird 

* FtoLib anEtini ti nda ut-t-s 

Qiiihtv C^mpADfntf 

* FHftoldcrtd Sitvtr FLrtiBfi 

* Kjfltpr>>f QiitrFkx wEi* 

* Fully ia milled, Wi -<akd. 

■-?-c-ttoJ*. Ihv i'"'kf design 
J»nt All B*n^!i Enfl WaRC 



^^jYj*^^-^^J^j£<>5 



•DosM* SLi+G5RV 

•Fill Silt G5RV 

lOUft 80-10 Djj^I* 
' Half Siz«G5RV' 

51 U 40-10 O.p.jic 
* Qonr*r Siz* G>RV 

36 ft 20-10 Dipol* 
*R* 3( ivM*Jt It! ft G5BV 
■ FUadvM*dr5l fi G>RV 2 
- >W burcm HXm [in* 






^ri 



Want fhnv Patti rns h Data? 



Order Hot-Line: 



A4d ?* Pa-H 



t r TtthSott #i*4-o tew p pd l 4 sa j ■806-926*7 37 j_ 

CIRCLE 296 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 2 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MAjCCOM 



AUTOMATIC ANTENNA MATCHER 

The ultimate advanced technology — 

when you need it most 



P.O. Box 502 
Ft. L*ud*rdal», FI. 33302 
(305) 523-5369 

|THE BOTTOM LINE) "MAXCDM^WDRKB 

CIRCLE 101 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Call Sonny 



48 HOUR 
SHIPPING 



ELENCO & HITACHI PRODUCTS 
AT DISCOUNT PRICES i 



ro ORDER 

CALL TOLL FREE 

l.fiOO 292-771 1 

.800-445-3201 (Can) 



Hitachi RSO Series 

I Portable Re a I -Urne Oigilal &16f4g* ysciHg-scopeBj 

VC-6D23 - 20MHz, 2GMS'5 Sl.frSS 

SQMHi, 20MIS/S 51,935 

5QMH2. 20MS/S S2.195 

Call 

Call 



VC-6C34 
VC-G025 
VG-6CMS 
VC-6145 



SPECtAL BUY 

V-212 - 20MHz Scope $409 



1D0MH2, 40MS'$ 



lOdMHi, iaawis/5 



ftSO'l IfQiTi HitKhi 'eak.r* it-! fi\pHii .ivbraging ;.i;\- 

TiflmDry, sra iilhirg inlarpaldi(Ki. offiviggiwi-ig. t:jfA<>f 
Tieasurerncni-s These s^opeE enab* rtmtt accyHE*. 
ain-pjifl ' ocrservaiion ol Dompi»j>. ^ivctorrns. in aaftugn \q 
aucn 'jncirans as hardcapjr vib a o*»i»r rtartar* toa 
wave*orm Iransrec via the ftS-23?C imeflac* Ef\\Qy ih* 
comtpri oi analog and :he pom* 1 ro digital 

2SMHz Elenco Oscilloscope 

$349 

S-1325 
- Dual Tract 

irnV Sensjlivity 
* e - CRT 

■ X-YOps#a[iGffl 

• TVSyrtC 

(2} ix, 10* Probes included 



Hi toe hi Portable Scopes 

DC Id SOMHz. 2 Cfuxmtf, OC ofbeHunc- 
tlon, AHwtkiIs mognrfiii function 

V-525 - CHT Readout, Cursor M#as. $995 

V-SSJ ■ Dalayeti Sweep $975 

V-SS? flasic Moat' 

V-422 ■ 40MH2 

V-223 20MHz dQiayed sw^ap 

V^222 - 20MHE dPluite ^^^___ 



HITACHI COMPACT SERIES SCOPES 

Thi» MW pfOw»S m*ft* r*w hifViHM Such «s CflT 
Readout. C-urso* meas'jrflnienfterv-ldB'i'JdeS^eeiA), Pre- 
dueiwy Cv (V-10«S[. Sw«*pimiB Autefungihu. r>Wy«4 
sweep and Tnppe- r Lock using e 6-mch Cfl T .Vou donl 1nel 
tft* ttin**Cth**S « I6«ns 01 p*rtQrtn*h« and cperjlftjr 



V-6&0 - 60MHz. Dual Trace 

V-665A ■ 60MHz, DT. w/cursor _ 

V-106D lOOMHi, Dyal Tfa« 

V-1D6SA- 10OMHZ, DX wVcursor 
V-10Q5 - 100MHz, OT. w/cunar _ 
V-1100A 
V-T150 



100MHz. Quad Trace 
150MHz. Quad Trace 



$1,143 

Si. 345 
St, 395 
Si. 649 
tt.995 
S2.19& 
S2.S95 



Elenco 40MHz Dual Trace 

hmh. S134Q 

* High luminance S" CRT 

■ imVSenBittvrh/ 

1 • 10KV AcoBteratiori Voltaye 

■■ 9na Rise Time 

• X-Y Oowaiicn 

Indudes \2) ix 10x Probes 

M scopes intlga* p^jOe*. scftemax^. oo*raiors martial and 3 year <? yf5 lor Elenco scopes) tfQiW "^t warraul^ on parts A later. Many aocesscries, available rw all Hitachi 
^s^Eg^Cajl_0M#niflJc£Mm£la^ p.; 6SMHljl7.95, P-2 IQOMKi $21^5 



^WWl^-!*^^, 




PRICE BREAKTHRU 



20MHz Digital Storag* Oicllloicop* 

■ ArvaJDfl/Djpnal Scopo 

■ ?K wo^ per chanrwl mefnory D$203 

• lOMSr's sampling rate 

* Slale o\ art technology $ 7 75 

■ Indutfes pro&es 

S-1M0 60MHz D.klV SwMp $775 



■ *"n <^n. 




B + K 

TEST 
EQUIPMENT 

All Hod** AvaJfUila 
Call for ipeeftl prlti 



Soldtring SUIIon 

Tirrpentur* CcrHraJled 

f sl» m 

Digital Display 

Temp Range: 

30OF-9OOF 

GfijurtdatJ Tip 

Ovwheit Prolict 




Jlgitol CopocHance Meter 
CM>1550B 

$5895 

Zero corvliol wi Cats 
Btp ■■ r>oi>ia-r 




Vk|« Hud T*it*r 

HT-M0 

$44.05 

Telhi fan it 
VHSrwid 
lidnlKlNt 
or worn 

Arnuil tar 
VCR*ort. 




> Digital LCR Meier 

$125 

Con* 1uH-300H 

Caps ipl-5ffllur 

Rft 01 2W* 

Big i* Display 




Quod Power Supply XP-5B0 



Hjjl I .--■. l 



2-20V $ 2.4 
12V#1A 



Fu Hy reguleietf vd ihtjn ei^un pfgieci** 



GF-80 1 6 Funcrion Generator 

■rith Fneq. Counter 

$249 

'Sinn. Sfljare Tnanpie 
FUM. Ramp. .2 in 2MHi 
F**«j Gounipr v 10MH2 
Im* Kt opeTBlraii 
I0F M1$ without Freq. Meter $ 1 77 




COMPUTED INT£flFACE 
TRAINER 
KK-450 
$130.05 



'IBU pc/xt wcompAtibit 
COfT^puber \n\a t trainee 




ft i l r 






Murhmelvr wkfri 

Cppocriante A 
fTraraittor Teller 

$55 CM-l$QQfi 

Reads VoHs. Dhmj 

Cumwr. Capacitors. 

tran«si945 giiwl 



Triple Power Supply XP-620 
.-.. Atsembled 175 

KHI50 

I Sff iiOit li 
-2to-l5V91A 

Enr4iti"i0V <0 *A|i 

a<id 5V ^ JA 
All 1he desired Features lor aaing »p:pBf hinnii 

f «91urt$ short circuil prrtacliWl ill Supplies 



i^*^!^ 




Fund ion Generator 

BIO i 

■■ S-:i.:-.-i..'Vv.i.jnil 




Learn to Build ond Progrorn 
Compiiters wllh ttil* Kll 

IrhclLdes All Parrs, Assembly and Lkboh Manual 

tfooel 

MM-800Q 

$129.00 




$2a,&5 



PrQY:d«L inlfi riijnqlii. tquWe 

wjiupLufn 1HJIO 1MHl 

AM l ■ FH ::jp;ihiln y 



Wide Bond Slgnol 
Generators 




Mdd-MetHr vanef nxhef, fou b mtth mho RAM;. 
FUUk and -un a KMS npcr(5|^ocatttir, wtucti uhc 



WE-WILLN0TBE UNDERSOLD 
UPS SHiPPil-aG -ife STATES s- 
I L" R E 5 / ? : TAX.S3m.in£lO'm,i» 

Others CALL 



Sti-sgao St 2« 

flF Freq iMK-eWMHi AM Uoduia- 
lior* of iKHr Variibld RF oirtpur 

SG-9500 wy Digital Otpplpy ft 
IWMrtz buirt-knCoimltr K« 



C&S SALES INC 



Color Convergence Generator 

3G-2M 

$89,95 

Kit U9M 

Fiiefl in (tit induury 

iora<ksitady penemt 

AF ft Video output 




FLUKE MULTIMETERS 

s«« ptmeier • (All Modeli AvaHable Ccld 



Mofj-fli 93 
Mode* $5 
Model 97 

tO 5a i la» 
M0(*&1 10 
Model 12 



Si.09S.00 
Si.39S.00 

t1.69S.00 



70 &*'!»■ 

Model 70M 
Model 7711 
Model 791 1 
90 S*rlti 

Model 4? 



165 00 

J14S.0Q 
$169.00 

saw.oo 



AM/FM TtansisTor 

Radio Kit 
with Training Course 

Model AMrFflHDJ 

$26.95 

14 T'jnsulois *■ j [>od« 
Makes i gi«al jchotf prDjid 




Trill RMS * VI 
Dl D It MurHmeler 
M-700T 

$135 

05% DC Accuracy 
F^flasislance 

wiln F«$^ C^vnlar 

Oa.1a Hoia 



LASER KITS 

guild j-eur own laser This jreat hit irdwJes all parrs needed :o build a class, n las** 
Sate to use, oufpul -s -jTfler -ere mihwdti. K-1 inc -udes a new He-Ne i i£5dia r5 75' 
long laser lube Comes wirh building insirueuons. sc-rerraiK: and all pans. 

Mod«!LK-l $79.95 



SpwiUcalions LK 1 
input voltage 
Output M-ottage 
Trigger vollage 
Laser ppwei 
Laser lubti [ype 
Laser tube izu 



F2VDC @ 1 25 amp 

£-3KV@3-4 &MA 

6-SKV 

1 -I I lAHll 

nelium - neon 
1.125" tfia x 5.75* lone? 




Mirror & Motor Kit 

This unique *si( allows yog ro oraiect laser paiterns on she ceiling or wans You change 
rhie patterns ty varying ;ne speed oi the motors The M ■comes eompieie mih 2 
rnolors 2 irom surface mirrors. 2 mot** rjr«hers a^d 1 power rheostat control to ^afy 
speed oi the moio* 

M*>d»liM-l 319.95 



1245 FfO'SEW.QQG. DEERFIELD'. IL GC015 
FAX Tfja-sa (--0085*17081 5410710 



15 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

2 YEAR WARRANTY 

WRITF FOR FftEF CATAIOG 



CIRCLE 184 Oft READER SERVICE CAR D 



Never Say Die 

Continued from page 4 
board displays in New Hampshire ho- 
tels and motels selling film and ottering 
processing. 

Everyone visiting Mew Hampshire 
brings a camera or two, so why not put 
the film right out there where it's easy 
to b uy an d give t he mote I a co m mi s ston 
on the sale? And get them to get their 
guests to send in the exposed rolls for 
processing for another commission. 
The finished pictures can be mailed to 
their home address. He'd soon have a 
fairly large business going and be able 
to expand into Vermont and Maine, 
both good vacation states. 

I don't know if he has the drive to try 
and start a business, but there's one 
just waiting for someone to make it 
happen. That could buiEd into a multi- 
million-dollar business in two or three 
years. 

There are unlimited new business 
possibilities if people would only start 
thinking in those terms. 

We have many products which could 
be developed for foreign sales. I don't 
know if you're aware of it or not, but 
America is one of the largest exporters 
in the world. Our exports have been 
growing recently and are now within 
$17 billion of our imports. Quite a 
turnaround. 

The recent growth of new licenses as 
a result of the no-code Tech license 
has gotten a rash of new small busi- 
nesses going in the ham market. Our 
new ham population has doubled in the 
last year ... which is why Radio Fun 
has been doing so well. It reaches 
these newcomers and gives them the 
information they enjoy reading. I'm de- 
lighted at some of the testimonials I've 
been seeing from advertisers too. The 
ham market is beginning to show some 
life. Too bad if you're not getting Radio 
Fun\ 

More Unreasonableness 

You've been reading about the mess 
our American educational system is in 
and the desperate need for restructur- 
ing. You've read about how our stu- 
dents are among the worst in the 
developed world in math, science, ge- 
ography and so on . Of course we make 
up for this incredible lack of results by 
spending more than double what most 
countries do per student. 

One result of this disaster is that we 
have such a poorly educated work 
force that we're no longer competitive 
with other countries with better educa- 
tion systems. 

Yes, I know \ should be busy working 
DX on 20m and shouting curses at 
KV4FZ T but I can't seem to help myself 
from getting embroiled in this educa- 
tion mess. You see, I have this fanatic 
religious conviction that amateur radio 
is a key to helping fix this whole thing J 
know my vision is not shared by many 
hams and is abhorred by the ARRL 
The last thing the old-timers running 
the League want is a zillion kids lousing 
up their bands. 

So my quest to get an eight-year 
course in the fundamentals of electron- 
ics, communications and computers 



into every school in America, backed 
up with radio, computer, science fair, 
and electronic experimenter clubs, is 
just another of my windmill jousts. . . 
like my campaign for the no-code li- 
cense. 

My vision is of two million American 
hams. . .no, make that three mil- 
lion . . . shouldn't we at least have dou- 
ble the number of hams in Japan, 
where they have half our population? 
And I see our newcomers going back to 
80% youngsters as it was in the 1 950s. 
Further, I see amateur radio again be- 
coming visible to the general public 
and performing a service worthy of the 
frequencies we have allocated. I see 
our main service to America as a sup- 
plier of enthusiastic high-tech career 
youngsters who will help build tens of 
thousands of small high-tech compa- 
nies. 

Poor old dreamy Wayne. ■. , the 
clean air up mere in New Hampshire 
must have gone to his head. Maybe. 
But it hasn't stopped me from getting 
involved with the New Hampshire Eco- 
nomic Development Commission Edu- 
cation Subcommittee and with the New 
Hampshire High Tech Council Educa- 
tion Subcommittee. Nor has it stopped 
me from reading everything I can find 
about restructuring our educational 
system or attending workshops on the 
subject. 

The result is that I have a fair idea of 
what's gone wrong and, as usual, 
some creative ideas on how to improve 
things. If you're interested in my re- 
ports to the governor, the Economic 
Development Commission, and so 
forth, you can gel a dump of my writ- 
ings via the 73 BBS- Or you can send 
$2 to cover duplication and mailing to 
Professor Green, 70 Route 202 North, 
Peterborough NH 03458. 

For that matter, I'm working on a 
book form of my complete report to the 
Commission. I hope to have it available 
in May. $20 should cover the cost. . . 
hey, tfs going to run close to 300 
pages. That sounds like a lot of money, 
but a ham in Alaska got a copy from our 
BBS and has already started some of 
the creative new businesses I outline in 
the report. 

Reinventing Schools 

How radical are my educational 
ideas? In addition to the tech course 
and high-tech clubs, I'm recommend- 
ing that schools go to 50 weeks a year 
with 10 five-week terms. That leaves a 
week off at Christmas and another in 
July* 

It gets worse. I'm also recommend- 
ing that we end compulsory education 
in New Hampshire., .that we allow 
students to progress at their own 
speed instead of in factory lock 
step. . .that students be allowed to 
take five week vacations when they 
want, taking off for a term now and 
then, No grades. No exams. Students 
work in teams of four instead of singly* 
The pass-fail decisions will be made by 
one's fellow students, not the teacher. 
No more "teachers" either; now they'll 
be facilitators and team leaders, 

Well, you'll have to read my papers 



on the subject to understand the rea- 
soning behind all this and how it all fits 
together as a completely new educa- 
tional system. Much of the responsibili- 
ty for one's education will rest on the 
students and their parents. I've also 
suggested ways of getting parents far 
more involved with the whole process, 

Isn't that what freedom is all about? 
Why should all children be sentenced 
to 10 years of involuntary servitude in 
government institutions? We call that 
slavery when it's adults. Isn't it time we 
slowed down on doing things for peo- 
ple's own good and started using rea- 
son and rewards to encourage compli- 
ance? 

At 70 I don't know if I'll live long 
enough to see either the rebirth of ama- 
teur radio or its death , , , but I know 
one or the other can't be far ahead, 
with no middle ground visible. You can 
check back over 42 years Of my editori- 
als to see how accurate my visions are. 
After reading a few old issues of 73 do 
you reatly want to bet I'm wrong? How 
much? 

I suppose I should do tike 90% of our 
retired hams and devote the rest of my 
life to rag-chewing and goif instead of 
getting all hot up about education and 
helping New Hampshire out of the re- 
cession with a long list of proposed 
strategic initiatives. 

None of my initiatives are really pe- 
culiar to New Hampshire* Many would 
help other states to cut down on state 
expenses, cut taxes, help industry to 
grow, and re-invent education. I don't 
want to suggest for a minute that you 
cut down on your rag-chewing, golfing 
or watching football on TV. I know that 
99,9% of you won't have the drive to try 
to actually do anything, but I kind of 
hoped a few of you might at least be 
interested enough to read what I've 
written and write to tell me that you 
don't agree with everything I pro- 
pose. . naturally omitting any details 
on what you don't agree with or why. 

And you're right. It's the nail that 
sticks up that gets pounded down, so 
never make any waves. But you know, 
I've spent most of my 70 years being 
pounded down, CQ has dumped on 
me. QST has dumped on me. The IRS 



dumped on me. An ex-wife dumped on 
me. Newspaper and magazine articles 
have dumped on me. I've got tapes of 
ARRL officials dumping on me at ham 
conventions Yet for some reason I 
keep making waves. Crazy old coot, 
must be the answer. You'll be a lot 
safer if you don't send for my stuff. 

No Russian Trip For Wayne 

I've been hoping I could get to Russia 
in May with Dave Larsen KK4WW Out- 
side of the fun of operating from Russia 
and the Ukraine, I was hoping my ex- 
pertise in small business development 
might be helpful. One of their biggest 
problems is converting from a govern- 
ment-run society to private business- 
es. I don't know if I could help or not, 
but it seemed worth trying. 

But then as my Economic Develop- 
ment Commission work dragged on 
months longer than I imagined possi- 
ble t I had to finally admit that I just 
wasn't going to be able to get away. 

In addition to my Commission work 
and a serious battle with the six major 
record companies to keep them from 
getting a tax put on all digital recording 
media (which they would split), I'm also 
starting a new music publication, the 
Secret Guide to Free Music. Plus I'm 
building up our recording, distribution 
and mail order businesses. The reces- 
sion has hit the music industry too, so 
that means more work for a while. 

Perhaps by 1993 1*11 have things 
more in hand and be able to get away. 
Perhaps by then the Russian countries 
will be settled down a bit and be better 
able to use my guidance. Things are 
probably in such a turmoil right now 
that I wouldn't be of much help, t think 
that only Moscow has really started en- 
cou raging small businesses to be 
formed. 

Still, I sure enjoy working the pile- 
ups, I love whittling 'em down t right on 
down to the mobiles and QRP ops. Do- 
ing the QSU isn't as much fun . 

I had another DXpedition offer to 
Sakhalin Island. . .you know, where 
they shot down the Korean airliner. I 
just don't have the time, . .sigh. Now 
why didn't I retire like everyone else 
when I was 65? 









JqSo/i ¥<*<§ 



QSL of the Month 

To enter your QSL, mail it in an envelope to 73, WGE Center, Forest Road, 
Hancock, NH 03449. Attn: QSL of the Month. Winners receive a one-year Sub- 
scription {or extension) to 73, Entries not in envelopes cannot be accepted, 



60 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ May, 1992 



CABLE T.V. CONVERTERS 

Jen-old", Oak. Scientific Atlantic, Zenith, & 
many others. "New" MTS stereo add-on: 
mule & volume. Ideal for 400 & 450 owners. 



1-800-826-7623 

B & B INC. ■ 

4030 Beau-DRue Drive, Eagan MN 55122 



CIRCLE 21 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



REPEATER LINK CONTROLLER 




LINKCOMMRLC-6 

ALLOWS 3 HUB OR CHAIN LINKS 

CAN SE INTERFACED TO MOST REPEATER 

CONTROLLERS 

DIRECT CONNECTION TO SCOMM 5/6 

REPEATER CONTROLLERS 

HALF OR FULL DUPLEX UNK 

REQUIRES ONLY 3 LOGIC UNES FOR CONTROL 



ONLY $149.95 




LED DISPLAY BOARD 
S-COM CABLE 



$29 95 
$9 95 



LINK COM M 

PO BOX 1071 ■ BOZEMAN, HT 59771 

(406) 587-4065 



CIRCLE 47 ON REAPED SERVKE CARD 



NEW ONLINE CALL DIRECTORY 

Our new HAMCALL service g»ves you 
494,114+ Hams, via your computer. 
$29 95 per year — unlimited use! 

BUCKMASTER PUBLISHING 
Mineral. Virginia 23117 

703: 894-5777 600: 282-5628 

CIRCL£ 7 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MAKE CIRCUIT BOARDS 
THE NEW t EASY WAY 




WITH TEC-200 FILM 

JUST 3 EASY STEPS: 

Copy circuit pattern on TEC 200 film 
using any plain paper copier 
Iron film on to copper clad board 

Peel off film and etch 

convenient S% x 11 size. 
With Complete Instructions 

SA TJSFA CJJOn GUAR A nTEED 
5 Sheets for $3.95 W Sheets only $5.95 

add $ 1 30 postage NY Res. add sales tax 

The MEADOWLAKE Corp. 

Dept, Q, P.O. Box 497 
Morthport. Hew York 1 1 768 




Today's No-Tune 
Multiband Antenna 



* 



No prvQia£ No maus^. Nj kn^i to iwijt 

TNT if No-Tut* $0 c*. 4a 2& 17. 11 la TST£ u No mo* op 

*X JX la Wait <n**T W»e4s wf tBKT, DK *G*i« r» w wf tt**wae? 



hihsA WfrRGfe 

TV TKodrrn tOOI-fed 

AntennasWest 

Bm 50O62S, Prm-o L7T MmS 



Kinlt-t > ri>of 
L-avr Nojse 




No lnpt or K«u£>n 
tawUttd to 5000 V 
Ritot 500 Win* 

TNT $89*'- 

Ore* 



p_. 



800-926-7373 



CIRCLE 135 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



* Air Coils are Pra- wound 




QRP CW TRANSCEIVER KIT 

• Available on 2QM or 40M band 

• Superior supernal design 

•Single-signal receiver 
■CW crystal ladder filler 

■ VF0 tuning wilh vernier dial 

■ RlT w/c&nier detent control 

• Very effective AGC 

• Selectable audio filler 

• Sld&tone oscillator 
•2-3 watts otfiF output 

• Semi break-in 
•12VDC operation 

• Custom pre-painted, punched & silkscreened cabinet 

• 100% comptete kit with instructions 

• Measures [HWD): 2 1 /4 ,r X6tt" X6" 
•Weight 24 ol 

•$149.95 * $4 .50 shipping & handling Michigan residents 
add 4% sales rax. 



For free catalog call or write 

OAK HILLS RESEARCH 

QRP HEADQUARTERS 

20879 MADISON STREET 

BIG RAPIDS, Ml 49307 

(616)796^0920 

24 HFL FAX— (616) 796-6633 





CIRCLE 82 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



The Best Shortwave You Can Buy 

Comes From Drake 




The Drake R8 Communications Receiver... simply the best shortwave clarity 
and fidelity you'll find, outperforming receivers costing much, much more. 

Famous Drake technology gives you wide frequency coverage of 
all world bands and excellent dynamic range... in an uncluttered package 
with an ergonomic front panel, featuring keypad entry of functions. 

For the best access to world events as they happen, buy yourself a Drake R8 
shortwave receiver. Ask vour dealer for more information, or contact a 
Drake sales office today at 1-800-723-4639 (1-800-RADIO-DX). 








We Bring the World Closer 



R. L Drake Company, P.O. Box 3006. Mianiisburg. Oil 45543, Lift Tel: 513-866-2421 
Drake Canada. 655 The Queenswav #16, Peterborough. Ontario K9J 7M1. Canada 
Tel: 705-742-3122 
1 -800-723-4639 ( I -800-RADIO-DX) C1991 The R.L. Drake Co. 

147 OH READER SERVICE CAR© 




Number 1 8 on your Feedback card 



Low Power Operation 




Photo A. Monitor your DC supply with this LEO expanded voltmeter 
circuit (shown on the right). 



Michael Bryce WB8VQE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
Massitton OH 44646 



Expanded Voltmeter 

Can you stand just one more ex* 
panded voltmeter? I sure hope so, as 
this is an easy project to put together 
and operate. In fact, there is not one 
single adjustment to be made. What 
makes this expanded voltmeter special 
is the 1 (^segment LED readout. All this 
magic is carried out by an LM391 4 dot/ 
bar display driver IC. 

Unlike other chips used today, the 
LM3914 does only one thing, and that 
is to light up 10 LEDs in bar mode, or 
one of 10 LEDs in the dot mode, In 
response to an input voftage. The 
LM391 4 contains a voltage divider and 
10 comparators that turn on In se- 
quence as the input voltage rises. 
There's also a 1-2 volt reference 
voltage source inside the LM3914, The 
LM391 4 comes in an 1 8-pin dual mime 
package. Figure 1 contains a simplified 
version of the circuit of the LM3914. 
You could build your own version of the 
LM3914 using LM339 comparators to 
gel a 10- LED bar display, but I don't 
see any reason why. The LM3914 goes 
for about $3 at most electronic supply 
houses. 

How It Works 

The expanded voltmeter takes ad- 
vantage Of the external reference pins 
of the LM3914. You can use either the 
built-in i .2 voU reference or supply a 
reference voltage to pin #6 (Rhi) of the 
LM3914. Pin MA (Rlow) is the ground 
return for the divider chain. This is ex- 
actly what we're going to do when we 
build the voltmeter. 

The reference voltage we'll feed lo 
the LM3914 comes from a 7805 T-amp 
regulator. This regulator wiN also 
source the LEDs. The 4-fi volts is 
placed on pin #6 of the LM3914. The 
low end of the divider chain is pin 4 and 
it's grounded. Pin 6 is +5 volts, pin 4 is 



ground, so we have established 5 volts 
across the divider. The LM3914 then 
divides this 5 volts into 10 equal steps, 
each one 0.5 volts DC. This estaWis fri- 
es the full-scale voltage (0-5) of the 
meter. 

The battery voltage is fed to a zener 
diode, In this case, it's a 1N5240, a 10 
volt zener diode. This zener diode sub- 
tracts 10 volts from our incoming 
voltage feed from the battery. The 390 
ohm resistor connected in series to the 
zener diode continually draws current 
through the zener diode and makes the 
voltage drop stable. The value of this 
resistor Is not critical. You can use al- 
most any value from 220 ohms up to 
1,000 ohms. Use something dose if 
you don't have the 390 ohm resistor in 
the junk box. 

If we use a 12 volt battery, the 
LM3914 "sees" only 2 volts. The 2 
volts are then applied to the 
input of the LM3914 and, 
when compared to the 5 
voU reference, the chip will [j 

then light up four LEDs (in 
the bar mode). Remember, 
each LED is worth 0.5 
volts, so 2 votts equal four 
LEDs, By using the zener 
diode, we have expanded 
the range of the meter to 
read 1 volts, no LED om to 
15 volts, or all LEDs iltumU 
nated. 

The 1 .5k resistor on pin 
f7of the LM3914 is used to 
control the amount of cur- 
rent flowing though the 
LEDs. Since we're feeding 
the LEDs 4 anodes from the 
7805, we can adjust the 
value of the 1 5k resistor to 
suite your liking. Lower the 
value and the UEDs will get 
brighter; raise the value 
and they'll be dimmer. The 
brighter the LEDs, the 
more current well be de- 
manding from the battery 



BiTTEBW 
l*#UT _ 



IN5iT4Q 

10 VOLT 
ZENER 



(N44XH 



X 



r 




QtfT 



LED \o m 



tz 



I* 



LED* 



■6 



■7 



M 



ioj jW 



LED I I 



I 



CONNECT 9 TO 3 
— "V FOH BAR 

OPEN FOR COT 



LUJ914 



aifrfe* writ 



4—4 



lit 



590 



Figure t Schematic diagram of the expanded voltmeter. 



we're Irving to measure. M you don't 
happen to have a 1 Sk resistor in your 
junk box, a 2.2k works very well. 

We could have sou reed the LEDs 
directly from the Vcc line, but that 
would have really put stress on the 
LM3914. They're kind of expensive 
chips to be cooking, so slick with the 
7B05. 

To keep the electronic expanded 
voltmeter from going up i n smoke if you 
connect it to Ihe battery backwards, a 
simple 1N4O01 diode is used. If you 
hook the meter up backward nothing 
bad will happen; in fact, nothing win 
happen at all 

Another feature of the LM3914 and 
of this project is the ability of the 
LM3914 to display either a moving dot 
(one LEO at a time) or bar mode (many 
LEDs at one time). Pin 9 selects either 
one. When pin 9 is connected to Vcc t 
we have bar mode, If pin 9 is left Moat- 
ing, dot mode. We should connect pin 
9 to pin 1 1 when using dot mode, but 1 
have not had any trouble just leaving 
the pin float, 

Construction Tips 

Because of the number of compo- 
nents used, a small piece of pert board 



could be used for construction. Howev- 
er, a lot of mistakes can be made when 
connecting the LEDs to the LM3914 A 
ready-made PC board is availabte from 
Far Circuits, 1BN640 Field Court, Dun~ 
dee, IL 60118, for $8 plus $1 50 for 
shipping. A complete set of parts, in- 
cluding the PC board, LM3914. LED 
strip and the 7805 may be purchased 
for $19,95 plus $1.50 shipping from 
me. 

Watch the Vcc and ground pins as 
they are different from many tCs you 
may be used to using. The Vcc pin is #3 
and the ground pin is 02. Remember, 
the LM3914 comes in an 18-pin DIP 
package. As the LM3914 is kind of ex- 
pensive, it would be a good idea to get 
a socket for it, 

The PC board has been laid out to 
accept a 10- LED strip. This makes a 
really nice display as all the LEDs are 
straight and of equal intensity. This 
strip is available from Mo user Electron- 
ics (part number is 351-2011), Of 
course, you don't have to use the LED 
strip as regular LEDs may be used. If 
you go this route, check each LED for 
brightness before you solder it in the 
PC board, I mounted the LED strip by 
inserting a 0.625" long nylon spacer on 





© 1 392 
SUNLI GHT 



Figure 2, PC board foil pattern* 



62 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 




COMMUNICATIONS 

ELECTRONICS INC. 
Emergency Operations Center 

has expanded to our new twg acre facility and 
World Headquarters. Because of our growth, 
CEI is now your one stop source for emergency 
response equipment. When you have a com- 
mand, control or communications need, essen- 
tial emergency supplies can be rushed to you by 
CEI. As always, for over twenty three years, 
we're ready, willing and able to help. For 1992, 
we're introducing new products from Uniden, 
Shinwa, Cobra, Ranger Communications, 
Grundig, Sangean, h/lagnavoxjcom andRELM. 

NEW! Shinwa SR001-B 

List price $799.95/0 E price $479.95/SPECIAL 
Continuous coverage from 25, 000 through 999. 995 MHz. 
tf you're looking for an excellent synthesized scan- 
ner designed for mobile surveillance use, the new 
Shinwa SR001 scanner offers features never be- 
fore offered at such a low price. When you purchase 
this wide band scanner from CEI, you'll get a free 
infrared wireless remote control that allows you to 
control your scanner from over 20 feet away. Se- 
lectable frequency Steps Of 5,0/1 0.0/1 2.5/20 .0/25.0/ 
50,0 or 100.0 KHz. are available. Dual antenna 
inputs terminating in an M N-type" and "BNG* con- 
nectors are included. Other features include 200 
memory channels grouped in 1 banks of 20 chan- 
nels, easy to read mu Iti color LCD display, lithium 
battery for memory back-up, 35 char net per sec- 
ond high speed scanning, priority, timer and even 
an alarm to alert you to transmissions on your 
choice of one special frequency. We even include 
a mobile mounting bracket The SR001 can be 
used for base station use with I he purchase of the 
ACS-S 12 volt DC power supply for only $34.95 
each, A great sounding external speaker #SPE-B 
is available for onJy $24.95. 

SHINWA POCKET PAGERS 

The fire department hazardous materials response 
teams and police department SWAT crews that need 
reliable radio alerting systems, stake their lives on 
Shinwa, We offer a two- tone pocket pager with monitor 
feature and even a voice storage option at an afford- 
able price . To o rde r T we n ee d y ou r pag I ng f req ue ncy as 
well as tone reed frequencies. For other configurations 
or two-way radio information, please fax us your sped- 
f icati o ns to 3 1 3- 663-8888 o r p hon e 3 1 3-996-8 888 . 

NEW! 1COM 1CR1-B 

List price $799.95/CE price $5 1 9.95/SPECfAL 

Continuous coverage from 100 kHz through 1. 300 GHz. 

The I COM ICR1 keeps you in touch with the world 
when you're on the go. The palm-size ICRt is 
equipped with AM, FM and wide-FM modes to fully 
answer your monitoring needs. With 100 memory 
channels and a dual frequency selection system, 
you get a lop-class communications receiver. Not 
only can you program scan searches only for sig- 
nals within a specified frequency range, its also 
possible to write frequencies of received stations 
automatically into memory. In addition, unwanted 
frequencies can be skipped. Order ICBC72-B bat- 
tery rapid charger for $99.95 and a BP84-B 1 ,000 
ma battery pack for $74,95. 

NEW! tCOM ICR100-B 

List price $799.95/CE price $579,95/SPECIAL 

Continuous coverage from 100 kHz. through 1856 Mhi. 

Now you can bring a wider world of broadcast- 
ing, VHF air and marine bands, emergency 
services and many more communications Into 
your vehicle. Icom's advanced ICR1 00 fully cov- 
ers all the stations worth hearing with up to 100 
memory channels and a multitude of features. 




SCANNERS/CB/RADAR 
UNIDEN 

PRO310E B Uniden 40 Gn, Portable/Mobil© CB ,.♦♦ $72.95 

PRO330E-B Unfden 40 Ch, Remote mount CS ..... $99.95 

GRANT-B Uniden 40 channel SSB CB mobile $152.95 

WASHINGTQN-B Unkten 40 Ch. SSB CB base $229.95 

PC122-B Uniden 40 channel SSB CB mobile $113.95 

PC66AB Uniden 40 channel CB Met) lie , $76*95 

PRO510XL-B Uniden 40 channel CB Mobile „_ $39,96 

PRO520XL B Uniden 40 channet CB Mobile ..„ „„, $54.95 

PR0535E-B Uniden 40 channel CB Mobile $£9;95 

PR0538W-B Uniden 40 ch. weathef CB Mobile $78.95 

PR0810E-B Uniden 40 channel SSB CB Base $174.95 

UNIDEN RADAR DETECTORS 

RD3000ZX-B Unftten 3 band suction mount radar „„ $11 9.95 

RD24Q0ZX-B Uniden 3 band radar detector ....$109.95 

R DS0-B Un eden 2 band radar detector , . . .. „ , ,„„, . $64.95 

CAflD-B 2 band credit card size radar detector ,$89.95 

RD3XL-B Uniden 3 band radar detector »»,..„.,„..„„. $109,95 

RD9XL-B Uniden "micro" size radar detector „. $69.95 

R027-B Uniden visor mount radar detector $39.95 

<§)O b 

19 PLUS-B Cobra CB radio $36.95 

18RV-B Cobra CB radio „ „„.,;. $54.95 

41 PLUS B Cobra CB radio * * ^$72,95 

70LTD-B Cobra remote mount CB radio ♦ .$99.95 

19LTO-B Cobra Classic series CB radio ..,►♦ ♦♦ ♦ $44,95 

21LTD-B Cobra C las sfc series CB radio $54.95 

25LTD-B Cobra Classic series CB radio $89.95 

29LTD-B Cobra CI as sic series CB radio .....$109.95 

146GTL-B Cobra AM/SSBCB radio. $129.95 

14SGTLB Cobra AM/SSB CB radio T ... $149.95 

9QLTO-B Cobra Base station $69.95 

142GTL B Cobra AM/SSB Base station $199.95 

2000GTL-B Cobra Deluxe AM/SSB Base station $379.95 

COBRA RADAR DETECTORS 

RD3163 B Cobra 3 band radar detector $109.95 

RD3175-B Cobra 3 band radar detector „. $129.95 

RD3173-B Cobra 3 band radar detector .♦„*. $139.95 

RD3183-B Cobra 3 band radar deteclor ..„«.,- „. $139.95 

Bearcat 200XLT-B 

List price $509.95/CE price $239 + 95/SPEClAL 

1 2 Band, 300 Channel, Handheld, Search, Limit. HoW, Priority, Lockout 
Frequency range: 29 54, 1 18-174, 406-5 12 t B06 956 MHz, 

Excludes 823.9875-849.01 25 and 863.9875-894.0125 MHz. 
The Bearcat 2O0XLT sets a new standard for handheld scanners in 
performance and dependability, This full featured unit has 200 pro- 
grammable channels with 10 scanning banks and 1 2 band coverage. 
If you want a very similar model without the 600 MHz. band and 1 00 
rian rie Is, o refer the BC100XLT43 for only S1 79,95. Includes antenna, 
carrying case boh loop, ni-cad battery pack. AC adapter and ear- 
phone . Order your scanner from CEI loday. 

Bearcat 800XLT-B 

List price $549.95/CE price $239.95/SPEClAL 

12-band. 40 Channel, Nothing excluded in the 800 MHz. band. 
Bands: 29-54, 1 16-174, 406-512, 806-956 Mhz. 
If you do not need the 800 MHz, band, order the Bearcat 
210XLT-B for the special CEI price of $139,95, 

Magnavox® Satellite Phone 

CE price $48,880.00/Special ordar - allow 45 days lor deEivery. 
When war broke out in Iraq, you hoard all \be action because 
CNN had a satellite telephone. When a disaster such as an 
earthquake or a hurricane strikes your community and commu- 
nications are disrupted, you can depend on instant reliable 
communications* just like CNN did using your Magnavox 
MagnaPhone. Inmarsat communication saleiiites are in geosta- 
tionary orbit along the equator. They beam two-way voice and 
data trans miss ions between your satellite phone and fixed earth 
stations. In most instances, telephone calls are dialed directly 
once you have selected The satellite serving your location. No 
matter where you are on the planet, the MagnaPhone automati- 
cally selects the Land Earth Station (LES) nearest the destina- 
tion called. This makes placing a call as easy as using a standard 
telephone. Ouai fD numbers permit a separate Inmarsat tele- 
phone number to be used to route calls to one of the external 
telephone ports which could be used for a fax machine or a 
computer data line. For telephone, telex, fax and data commu- 
nications anywhere in the world, the new MX2020P MagnaPhone 
is the most compact fn mar sat- A. Ciass 1 terminal availabfe 
today. Like a cellular phone, airtimo will bo billed to your 
account. The new MagnaPhone weighs just 47 lbs (21 kg), 
including the antenna. Add the optional rugged Ized case (only 
$950.00) and it can travel as airline baggage on commercial 
carriers. When you arrive at your destination, installation can be 
done in less than five minutes, For more information call our 
Emergency Operations Center at 31 3-&96'8898 T 



flELM UC2Q2-B 2 Watt transceiver on 154 + 57 MHz,$1 14.95 

RELM HH25GNB-8 £5 Watt VHF transceiver .♦. $299,95 

RCI2950-B Ranger Comm, 25 Watt 10 Meter xcevn $234,95 
MR8100-B Uniden surveillance scanner XALL FOR PRICE 

BC55XLT-8 Bearcat 10 channel scanner ++ ' u ++ .$114 + 95 

AD100-B Plug in wall charger for 8C55XLT llh 14.95 

PS001-B Cigarette lighter cable tor BC55XLT ' $14.95 

VC001-B Carrying case tor BC55XLT $14.95 

BC70XLT-B Bearcat 20 channel scanner $139.95 

BP70-B Ni-Cad battery pack tor BC70XLT scanner ..$39.95 
BC142XL-E Bearcat 10 channel 10 band scanner „., $64,35 
BC147XLT-B Bearcat 16 channel 10 band scanner . r $94,95 
BC172XL-B Bearcat 20 channel 1 1 band scanner *, $124.95 
BC177XLT-B Bearcat 16 channel n band scanner $13,95 
BC590XLT-B Bearcat 100 channel 11 band scanners 194. 9 5 
8C760XLT-B Bearcat 100 channel 12 band scanner $254, 9 5 

BG002-B CTCSS tone board tor BC590/760XLT $54.95 

8C003-B Switch assembly for 8C590Y760XLT ..., $22,95 

BC855XLT-B Bearcat 50 channel 12 band scanner $174,95 
8C560XLT-B Bearcat 16 channel 10 band scanner ..$94.95 

BP2Q5 B Ni-Cad battery pack for BC20CV100XLT $39.95 

TRAVELLER2-B Grundfg shortwave receiver .$84.95 

COSMOPOLITE Grundig shortwave receiver $179.95 

SATELLIT500-B Grundig shortwave receiver $499.95 

SATELLIT650-B Grundtg shortwave receiver ...„,„„ $849,95 

ATSeoo-B Sangean shortwave receiver $89.95 

ATS803-B Sangean shortwave receiver $159.95 

74102-B Midland emergency weather receiver $34,95 

77116-B Midland GB with VHF weather & antenna ♦♦. $66.95 

771 13-B Midfand CB mobile with VHF weather $62,95 

7791 3-B Midland CB portable with VHF weather $79.95 

76300- B Midland CB base station « ^-,^^....$92.95 

NPD-B Uniden National Police Directory .,,♦ ..„...„. $19,96 

FBE-B Frequency Directory for Eastern U.S.A. , + ..„ +<l $14 t 95 

FBW-B Frequency Directory for Western U.S.A $14,95 

RFD1-B MI P PL. IN. KY. OH, Wi Frequency Directory .$14.95 

RFD2-B CT. ME. MA. NH r Ri, VT Directory $14.95 

RFD3-B DE, DC. MD. NJ, NY. PA. VA. WV Directory $14.95 
RFD4 AL AR. FL. GA, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, IN, VI .$14.95 
RFD5 AK. iD. IA. MN. MT. NE, ND, OR. SO T WA, WY$14.95 
RFD6 CA. NV. UT, AZ. Hl f GU Frequency Directory . $14.95 
RFD7-B CO, KS. MO. NM, OK t TX Freq. Directory ... $14.95 

PWB-B Passport to World Band Radio $16.95 

ASD-B Airplane Scanner Directory ....$14.95 

TSG-B "Top Secret" Registry of U.S. Govt. Freq, $16.95 

TTC-B Tune in on Telephone Carls $14.95 

CBH-B Big CB Handbooto'AM/FM/Freeband $14.95 

TIC-B Techniques for intercepting Communicatees „ $14.95 

EEC-B Embassy & Espionage Communications $14.95 

SMHV1-B Scanner Modification Handbook/Volume 1 $18.95 
SMHV2-B Scanner Modification Handbook/Volume 2 $18<95 
LIN-B Latest Entel3igenceby James E, Tunnell ..,„.,„. $17-95 
A60-B Magnet mount mobile scanner antenna .♦♦♦„♦♦♦. $39<95 

A70-B Base station scanner antenna, +++.»...++..***-.<* $3&ft5 

USAMM-B Mag mount VHF anL w/ 12" cable ,. ft+H ,. ft „$39 t 95 
USAK-B 3/4" hde mount VHF antenna w/ 12' Cable ,.$34,95 

Add $$.00 shipping for ad accessories otdeted at the same time. 
Add $ 15, 00 shipping per radio and $6. 00 per antenna. 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

Michigan residents please add 4% sales tax orsuppty your 
tax LD, number. Written purchase orders are accepted 
f rom approved govern m e nt ag onci es and most we 1 1 rated 
firms at a 10% surcharge for net 10 billing. All sales are 
subject to availability, acceptance and verification. Prices, 
terms and specifications are subject to change without 
notice. All prices are in U.S. dollars. Out of stock Items will 
be placed on backorder automatically or equivalent prod- 
uct substituted unless CEI is instructed differently. Ship- 
ments are F,O.B. CEI warehouse in Ann Arbor. Michigan, 
No COD'S. Not responsible for typographical errors. 

Mai I or de r s to ; Comm un icat ions E led ronics, Box 1 045, 
Ann Arbor ; Michigan 481 06 USA Add $1 5-00 per radio tor 
U. P.S. ground shipping and handling in the continental 
U.S.A. For Canada, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Alaska, or APO/ 
FPO delivery, shipping charges are two times continental 
U.S. rates. If you have a Discover, Visa, American Express 
or MasterCard, you may call and place a credit card order, 
5% surcharge for billing 1o American Express. For credit 
card orders, call toll-free in the U.S. Dial 800- USA-SCAN. 
For i n f o rmation call 31 3-996-8868 FAX any 1 ime, d lal 3 1 3 - 
663-6888. Order from Communications Electronics today. 
Scanner Distribution Center™ and CEI logos are trade- 
marks of Communications Electronics Inc. 
Sale dates 12^91 through 5/31/92 AD #121 591 -B 
Copyright © 1992 Communications Electronics Inc. 

For more information call 

1 -31 3-996-8888 

Communications Electronics Inc. 
Emergency Operations Center 

P.O. Box 1045, Ann Arbor, Michigan 481 06-1 045 U.S.A. 
For orders call 313-996-8888 or FAX 313-663-8888 

CIRCLE 121 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



the first and last LED. This provides 
support and keeps the LED strip from 
bending, If you don't use the LED 
strip, you could use nylon spacers on 
each LED as well to keep them all 
upright. It might be a tight fit with all 
10 spacers under the LEDs. 

If you use individual LEDs, you 
might want to add some color to the 
project. The lower voltage LED could 
be red, some yellow or green in the 
middle, and red LEDs at the top two 
positions, 

The PC board allows you to install 
the LEDs either vertically or on a 
slant. Don't install two rows of LEDs! 
Doing so will trench fry the LM391 4. 

Install a small heat sink to the 7605 
regulator if you use the voltmeter in 
the moving bar mode. You won't 
need to heat-sink the regulator if you 
set the mode to moving dot as only 
one LED will be on at a time. 

Assembly is easy. Stuff the PC 
board and check out your work, If 
you want the moving bar display, 
solder a resistor fead in the two PC 
holes marked ,l mode," For the mov- 
ing dot display, don t use the jumper. 

Check over your work before 
adding juice to the circuit. There's 
nothing to adjust or set up. Use a 




Figure 3. Parts placement 



variable power supply to test out the 
voltmeter to verify operation before you 
connect the meter to a battery. As you 
raise the voltage, the LEDs will light 



up (depending on what mode you have 
the display in). If you have the display 
in the moving bar mode, at 15 VDC 
all the LEDs should be illuminate. At 



10.5 volts, all the LEDs should be 
dark. 

That's it! But before you button 
the meter up, you'll have to add 
some type of scale, I for one can't 
remember what LED should be 
glowing at any one time. 

Install the meter in a small plastic 
box, A paper scale was laid out and 
placed on the front of the box. This 
method seems to work quite well. 
Nothing fancy, but it gets the idea 
across. Start with the bottom LED 
at 10,5 volts (at 10 volts, all the 
LEDs are oft) and the top (or tenth 
LED) at 15.5 volts. 

If you have the display set as a 
moving bar, total current for all the 
meter will be around 130 m A. Mov- 
ing dot display requires 30 mA. Jn 
Ihe moving bar mode t I would not 
want to leave the meter connected 
to a small battery very long. This 
expanded voltmeter would be a 
great accessory to a variable pow- 
er supply on your work bench. 
RVers t as well as mobile operators, 
might find it useful. 

Field Day QRPers can keep an 
eye on their batteries. You'll find 
this expanded voltmeter a valuable 
part of your tool box. 




Number 1 9 on yoiir Feedback card 



IRCUITS 



Great Ideas From Our Readers 



Crystal Matching and 
Activity Tester 

Hams still use crystals for many 
purposes: VXOs in QRP gear; in 
matched frequency sets for IF ladder 
and lattice filters; local oscillator in- 
jection to product detectors; as 
'quick and dirty 1 ' RF sources for ex- 
perimentation, and many other uses. 
Many different crystals available as 
surplus are quite inexpensive, and 
there are a number of crystals resid- 
ing near the bottom of a number of 
junk boxes, manyofwhichcanbeput 
to use. 

Crystals vary in activity and many 
crystals, especially those in FT-241 
and FT-243 holders 1 tend to age, and 
both frequency and activity are sub- 
ject to change over time. Even if they 
have quit entirely they can be taken 
apart and washed in alcohol and re- 
placed in their holders. Modern crys- 
tals in hermetically sealed metal cas- 
es seldom age much and rarely quit 
operating unless a mechanical 
shock has broken an internal con- 
nection. 

This simple circuit allows rapid 
testing of crystal activity— if the crys- 
tal is good r the LED lights. The con- 
nector allows monitoring of crystal 
frequency with a frequency counter, 
making selection of matched fre- 
quency crystals for IF fitters a simple 
matter. Crystals of frequencies from 
below 1 MHz to over 13 MHz will os- 



cillate readily in this circuit. Crystals 
oscillate in their series mode, slightly 
higher in frequency than that marked 
on the holders. 

One-half of a 7400 2- in put quad 
NAN D gate TTL chip is connected as 
an oscillator and is followed by an 
NPN transistor switch. RF from the 
oscillator is rectified by a pair of ger- 
manium diodes (silicon will also 
work), filtered, and the resulting DC 
voltage applied to the gate of the 
transistor, which causes it to con- 
duct. Collector current then illumi- 
nates the LED to indicate that the 
crystal is oscillating. 

A crystal of normal activity will 
cause the LED to light brightly. If 
crystal activity is low the LED will be 
less bright, and the crystal most like- 
ly should not be used. If a crystal will 
not oscillate, the LED will remain 
dark. 

If a very accurate indication of 
crystal activity is required, the diodes 
and filter can be fed through a poten- 
tiometer into a microammeter to 
ground. This replaces the transistor 
switch and LED, The pot will set the 
meter indication at a reference point 
on the meter scale with an active 
crystal in the circuit. Additional crys- 
tals will produce a meter indication 
higher or lower than that established 
with the first crystal, thus showing 
they are more or less active oscilla- 
tors. This is rarely of major impor- 




T0 FREQUENCY 
COUNTER 

+5VDC 




IN34As 

INSOs 

etc. 



a) 



I 



2N3904 
2N2222 
etc. 




b) 



T 



Figure la and 1b. 



tance. The simple GO-NO GO indica- 
tion with the LED will suffice in most 
instances. 

Depending on the type of holders 
used for the crystals you have, one or 



more suitable crystal sockets can be 
pa railed for ease of use in testing. 

J> Frank Brumbaugh KB4ZGC 

Bradenton FL 



64 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



De 



Number 20 on your Feedback card 



ALER DIRECTORY 



DELAWARE 



New Castle 
Factory authorized dealer! Vaesu, fCOM, 
Kenwood. Ten-Tec. AEA. Kan ironies h DR- 
SI Mfg., Ameritron, Cushcrart* HyGaJft, 
Heil Sound, Standard Amateur Radio, 
MFJ, Hustler, Diamond, Butternut, As- 
tron, Larsen, and much more. DELA- 
WARE AMATEUR SUPPLY, 71 Meadow 
Road, New Castle DE 1 9720. (302) 328- 
7728. 



IDAHO 



Preston 

Ross WB7BY2 has the largest stock of 
amateur gear in tne intermountain West 
and the best prices. Over 9,000 nam rent- 
ed gear in stock. Call us For " all " your ham 
needs today. ROSS DISTRIBUTING CO., 
78 5. State, Preston ID 83263. (208) 
852-0630. 



NEW JERSEY 



Park Ridge 
North Jersey's okjest and finest Short- 
wave and Ham Radso Dealer ivt miles 
from Garden Slate Parkway, Author i2ed 
Dealers for AEA, Kenwood, Japan Radio 
Company, ICOM, Yaesu, etc. Ham Sales, 
Lee WK?T GILFER SHORTWAVE, 52 
Parte Ave., Parte Ridge NJ 07656. (201) 
391-78*7. 



NEW YORK 



Manhattan 
Manhattan's largest and only ham 
and business Radio Store. Featuring 
MOTOROLA, ICOM. KENWOOD. 



YAESU. AEA, SONY, PANASONIC, MFJ. 
GBC CLOSED CIRCUIT TV CAMERAS 
AND MONITORS, BIRD WATTMETERS, 
OPTO ELECTRONICS FREQUENCY 
COUNTERS. AOR SCANNERS. 
TEN-TEC, ETC. Full stock of radios and 
accessories. Repair lab on premises. 
Open 7 days M-F, 9-6 p.m.- Sat. & 
Sun., 10-5 p.m. We ship Worldwide For 
Specific information call or write; 
BARRY ELECTRONICS, 512 Broadway, 
New York NY 10012. (212) 925-7000. 
FAX (212)925-7001. 



OHIO 



Columbus 
Central Ohio's lull-line authorized dealer 
for Kenwood, J COM. Yaesu, Alinco, Japan 
Radio. Standard, AEA, Cusfocraft, 
Hustler, Diamond and MFJ, New and used 
equipment on display and operational 
in our 10,000 sq. ft. facifrty Large SWL 
department, loo. UNIVERSAL RADIO, 
6830 Americana Pkwy +( ReynoJdSburg 
(Columbus) OH 43068. (61 4) 866-4267 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Trevose 

Authorized factory sales and service. 
KENWOOD, ICOM. YAESU, featuring 
AMERITRON, B&W, MFJ, HYGAIN, KLM, 
CUSHCRAFT, HUSTLER, KANTRON- 
ICS, AEA n VIBROPLEX, HEIL. CALL- 
BOOK, ARRL Publications, and much 
more. HAMTRONICS, JNC. 4033 
Brownsville Road, Trevose PA 19047. 
(215) 357-1400. FAX (215) 355-805B- 
Sales Order 1-800*426-2820. Circle 
Reader Service 298 for more information, 



DEALERS Your company name and message cai 

lb nuntttt (prcptftf). No mention of rniii-fl*d§r buiinm pSK. Directory i**i 

R*3to rod»r.Sox27t,Foiwt Road, Mme«*NH 034*9. 



m WMywy (prepaid}, or *2iQ for 
tjMtt* Must nacr ui 60 d*y* n 
ftands by February lit. Hii to ^ 



RTTY Loop 

Continued from page 78 
dialects of BASIC, from older inter- 
preied ones to some of the compiled 
versions of the language now avail- 
able, 

As you can see. I aim to please, with 
responses to your questions! Next 
month, we'll try to get through a stack 



of letters thai are gathering dust on my 
desk. In the meantime, feel free to bug 
me by mail, on CompuServe (ppn 
75036,2501), Delphi (MarcWA3AJR>, 
or America Online (MarcWA3AJR). I 
look forward to each and every com- 
ment or question, critique or sugges- 
tion, about "RTTY Loop." 



(Program listing continued from page 78) 

1140 IF WPM>=13 TOEN EL€ = DIT CLSE £LE=DrT((CWPMArVPM- 

1)*13+2V2 
1150 RETURN 
1160" 

1170' disptay current speed and frequency, return cursor where il was. 
1 1 80 COL = POS(0): ROW = CSRUN: LOCATE 1 .60 
1 190 PRINT ' worn; '; WPM: LOCATE 2,60: PRINT "rreq: *; F; " ' 
1 200 LOCATE 2 t 5: PRINT WPM: ' * 
1210 LOCATE ROW.COL 
1220 RETURN 
1230' 
1240 ' set MORSE to random value from up to numcodes to select random 

char. 
1 250 ' force a space character after every fifth time we are called 
1260 and a newline before every 13 groups. 
1270 IF NCHRS=5 THEN PRINT * ';: GOSUB 990: NCHRS=0: 

NGRPS^NGRPS+1 
12fl0 IF NCHRS=0 AMD NGRPS- 13 THEN PRINT: NGRPS-0 
1290 MORSE = INTiRND 1 NUMCODES) 
1300 NCHRS-NCHRS + 1: RETURN 

1310" 

1320 * handle F9, the pause control. 

1330 COL9=POS<0): RQW9 = CSRLtN 

1340 LOCATE 24.30: COLOR 16,7: PRINT * Press any key to continue ■; 

T350XS = iNKEY$: FXS = " THEN 1350 

1360 LOCATE 24,30: COLOR 2,0: PRINT" 

1370 LOCATE ROW9.COL9: RETURN 



I 



RF POWER 

TRANSISTORS - TUBES 



PARTIAL LISTING OF POPULAR TUBES AND TRANSISTORS IN STOCK 



TRANSISTORS 


TRANSISTORS 


0UTVT¥0DUL€S 


POWER A SPECIAL 


CDZ&64A 


S24 00 


2N1522 


$11 96 


HUM 


549.50 


5728/51 EDL 


554 95 


ECG34D 


3 40 


2N3553 


2 85 


SAV6 


33 70 


Match Pr. 


11995 


MGF130? 


7.35 


2N3771 


2.95 


SAV7 


39,95 


007 PL 


10,95 


MGF14D2 


17.96 


2N3666 


1 25 


SAV12 


19.95 


810 PL 


109.50 


MBF134 


18QC 


ZN4048 


T1J& 


SAV22A 


49.95 


QUA PL 


13.95 


MRF13E 


21.00 


2N4427 


1.25 


M5772I 


67.75 


Match Pr. 


31,90 


MRF137 


24.00 


2N51C9 


1.75 


M57729 


69 95 


Specify H or/Vert oper. 


MRF141G 


190 00 


2N517S 


1.25 


M57732L 


34 70 


813 PL 


36.95 


MRF1S1G 


179 95 


2H55B9 


13.00 


M57737 


38 95 


A33A PL 


84.95 


MRF221 


1200 


2N5590 


1000 


M55741 


59 00 


033C PL 


99.95 


MHFZ24 


17 75 


2N5HI 


1450 


M57745 


99 95 


M2057 GE 


2&.9S 


MRF237 


3.70 


2K5945 


10 00 


M577G2 


76.60 


5753 


19 95 


MRF23fi 


1600 


2 N 5946 


15 00 


M57795M 


54 95 


5894 PL 


48.45 


MRF239 


1700 


2 N 5090 


975 


W57796 


35 70 


6U6BNAT 


13.95 


MRF24D A 


16 50 


2N50S1 


11 75 


MHW SERIES 


CAU 


v.aich Pr 


29 95 


WRF24S 


32 00 


2N6SB2 


14 75 


RECffVMG TUBES 


61461 GE 


24 95 


MRF247 


23 35 


7NHJ3 


14.75 


GAJfftA 


13.95 


MalCHPr 


57 95 


MRF2&C 


11 50 


2NB0W 


14 75 


urn 


7 95 


6146W 


1995 


MRF262 


1275 


2*6456 


19 75 


6A2I 


1495 


MM 


16 95 


WRF2&4 


t3 75 


2SB754 


2 50 


G8A6 


6.95 


6973 


19 95 


MRF309 


60 00 


2SC730 


4 50 


Ma 


695 


7199 


1895 


WPF3Z7 


62 00 


2SCI729 


19 25 


G8K6 


1195 


7799 


69 95 


MR F 421 


24 00 


2SC1945 


575 


8805 


1095 


7558 


1495 


WRF422 


34 95 


2SC1945A 


15 65 


6826 


795 


7581/KTGti 


17 55 


MRH33 


12.20 


7SC1&47 


9 75 


6CA7/EL34 


CALL 


6072 


169 95 


HRF45Q 


1350 


2SC1955 


9 00 


6CB6 


595 


B122 


159.95 


MRF454 


14.50 


2SC1M9 


2,25 


6CGBA 


1095 


8417 GE 


19.95 


Mfif455 


11.25 


2SC1971 


4.80 


BCtf 


13.75 


B873 El 


399 95 


MRF455A 


12.25 


2SC2A2A 


1.95 


6CW4 


14,70 


9875 El 


339.95 


MRF450 


17.95 


2SC2029 


3.50 


GCX9 


11.95 


B90B GE 


26. M5 


MRF475 


9.25 


2SC2053 


1.20 


6CJ7 


12.95 


0950 GE 


20 75 


MRF476 


4 00 


2SC2075 


1 75 


GGK6 


1395 


Maicri Pr 


45.90 


MRF477 


1250 


2SC2094 


1595 


6GW8 


895 


2C39A/B 


59 95 


MRF485 


12 95 


2SC2097 


23 95 


6HF5 GE 


1795 


3 400Z|l| 


124 95 


MRF49? 


15 95 


2SC21G6C 


1 50 


6J85A 


CALL 


B4MZ P 


8995 


MRF497 


19 75 


2SC2221 


8 25 


GJGG 


CALL 


3-5MZ Ef 


142.95 


MRF515 


290 


2SC2237 


940 


6JH8 


1295 


3-5007GPL 


11995 


MRF&&5 


350 1 


2SC22B9 


IS 15 


6JS6C GE 


18 95 


4-4C0CEI 


159 95 


MRF^SS 


2.25 ' 


2SC2290 


1595 


6K0G GE 


1895 


4 1D00A |t| 


b^5 H 


MRF629 


425 


2SC2312C 


550 


6KVS 


CALL 


3CXlO0A5:*^ 


69 95 


MRF630 


375 


2SC2395 


27 75 


6LB5 


CALL 


3CK400A? El 


329 75 


MRF&41 


1995 I 


2SC2509 


1085 


6LF6CE 


19 95 


3CKBC0A7 El 


329 95 


MHFB44 


23 00 


2SC2630 


24.25 


ELOfi GE 


19.95 


3CX12DOA7EI 424 50 


MRF646 


24 75 


2SC264C 


1700 


6LR6 GE 


1995 


3CX>500A7 El 


624 50 


MHF&4& 


29 95 


2SC2782 


37 75 


6LX6 GE 


19.95 


3GX30O0A7 El 


694 50 


MRF901 


150 


2SC2783 


5965 


6MJ6 


CALL 


4CX2500 El 


99.60 


MRF9f§ 


350 


2SC2S79 


1995 


65K7[] T B 


9.95 


4CX250R 


CALL 


MRF1946 


1500 


2SC2904 


32.50 


128Y7A NAT 


11 75 


4CX3D0A 


CALL 


SRF2D72 


1375 


2SC2905 


34 50 


12JB6 GE 


19.95 


4CX350A 


CALL 


S8F36S2 


29 50 


2SC3101 


12.26 


27LF6 NAT 


21.95 


4CX350F 


CALL 






J310 


150 


30ND5 SYL 


17.95 


4CX1500BEI 
4CX5000A 


68700 
1085.00 



Mlgr EU Eirnac PL = P&nta Labs Note (!} ■ Industrial Bpx&d Elmac/Ampere* 
Limited Wa* raniy 12 month ( 3.00Q nciurs uw Pertia 4 Fimac Iransmittrng tubes 

Pnce A itvjit.ibtttry subfect fy znange wifftott! nonce * Quantity Pricing AviViabie 

Satisfaction Guaranteed it not safistiBd wiin the merchanrjise you rscervc. return it wiirtm 30 days 
iron the date Qlpurthistl receive refund or «dai ;- bootearenotrrtumatti (Mcfaimlsc 
•inist fce returned 10 origiitai condition wrttt ortoinal invntce A stiirjpiOQ prepaid \ 

Orders received Cy 3 p rn P%1 [5 3 m EST; are sh-ppM same day Minimum Order S20 
We pietr *c Shifl &¥ UPS We also offei Federal Express fcfbwn&'DHL/USPSfelc 

SHIPPING METHOD 6 CHARGES 
BEST WAT UPS - ShippiflQ & nandlfig cttarge **> \b -orriinertUi U S 1 
UPS GROUND 9 wwlmgdays $3 50 miram^ti - ActJit cnjfge vanes w&fr weight 
UPS BLUE l - 2 worung rays $5 ^0 nunifnurr - Aclual charge vanes wtli wbqM 
UPS HHh Wot K»or king tey $13 50 minjraain- Actual clurge vanes wiftlt wertta 
UPS RED SATUflOAV DELIVERY -VidSiOOO to-en day rate (Sony-noCOD 
UPS to Alaska Pjerio Rico Hawaii / Canada - Ordet prepaid or VISA/Masfercarti 
FIRST CLASS MAIL 10 worK>ng days S4 00 minimum (Sofy - noC D » 

PAYMENT -3. be 0y C Cash or ViSA^MasTeicafd COD Orders add WOO 
RATED ACCOUNTS N- upon approval of credrt 

CALIFORNIA 'esiders add appropriate sales 4 ,a* 

FORErGN Arjo S5 50 lot Small Packet to 10 oz Air parcel delivery & insuiance/fegrs available 

MonrJay - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. PST / 10:30 a.m. - 8 p.m. EST 

•EXPORT •0E.M. • SERVICE *R&0 • AMATEUH • MARINE 



ORDERS ONLY 



1800-RF PARTS 
1 -800-737-2787 



NO TECHNICAL 



MAIM ORDER LINE 1 -€19-744-0700 IMF0RMATI0N 



CUSTOMER SERV 



t -61 9-744-0750 

(10 a.m. - 4 p.m. only) 



TECHNICAL 



r - 



1-619-744-1943 FAX 



1 320 GRAND AVENUE #16 
SAN MARCOS, CA 92069 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 65 



Number 21 on your Feedback card 



New products 

Compiled by Hope Currier 




j»COM 

New from j»Com is a series of 
almost invisible antennas for VHF 
and UHF. The Stealth Antenna is 
a tiny 3.5* square of 0.003" thick 
copper-clad polymtde coated with 
a non-corrosive graphite colored 
coating which adheres to the in- 
side of a car windshield. It looks so 
much like a decal that it is even 
available with an optional printed 
warning symbol to deter would-be 
thieves and vandals- Thieves in 
search of a an expensive trans- 
ceiver to steal are less likely to be 
attracted Co a vehicle that doesn't 
have a visible antenna. 

Despite its incredibly small size, 
this antenna outperforms a quar- 
ter-wave whip under many cir- 
cumstances. It is an etched cop- 
per antenna, multipolarized to 
reduce QSB caused by the vary- 
ing polarization of signals re- 
ceived in a moving vehicle. The 



antenna presents a low SWR over 

the entire band and requires no 
adjustments or tuning. Best of all. 
it can be installed without drilling 
holes or risking paint scratches 
from magnets or suction cups. 
Once installed, it is inside the ve- 
hicle, protected from the ele- 
ments, and never in the way in a 
car wash or low garage. 

The Stealth Antenna is avail- 
able in models for 146 MHz, 220 
MHz, and 440 MHz. The standard 
model can handle SO watts of in- 
put power and costs $59,95, in- 
cluding shipping in the continen- 
tal US. A high power version 
capable of handling 110 watts is 
available for $69.95. Sixteen feet 
of RG-58/U coax is included in the 
price, For more information, con- 
tact your local ham radio dealer or 
j*Com, Box 194, Ben Lomond CA 
95005; (408) 335-9120, Fax: 
(408) 335-9121. Or circle Reader 
Service No. 201. 




AMATEUR RADIO 
ENGINEERING 

A. R.E. has introduced a new ex- 
ternal speaker, plus a 2- to 4-digit 
DTMF decoder, for use with VHF/ 
UHF radios. The Silencer {Model 
APE-^Ot s user-programmable 
for a DTMF code which enables 
(opens) the speaker for approxi- 
mately 10 seconds when the prop- 
er tone is received. When I he cor- 
rect code is received an LED 
lights on the ARE- 10 to tell the 
user that a call has been received. 
The ARE-10 allows the user to set 
the front toggle switch to MONI- 
TOR when they want to hear ev- 
erything being said on the fre- 
quency. The toggle switch also 
has a momentary position which 
is used to turn the LED off after a 
calk has been received. 

The ARE-10 provides a way for 
everyone to economically have se- 
lective calling. It also allows family 
members or co-workers to avoid 



hearing everything being said on 
today's busy frequencies. Rather 
than turn the radio off to eliminate 
the annoyance, just set the toggle 
switch to DECODE and The Si- 
lencer will eliminate all of the chat- 
ter, while allowing the user to still 
receive calls. To connect the ARE 
to a radio, all that is necessary is to 
pfug the ARE-10 into the external 
speaker jack on the radio and con- 
nect its power lead to 12 volts DC. 
Simple and fast. 

The ARE-10 includes a high 
quality speaker that will improve 
the audio from today's trans- 
ceivers, It is compact, measuring 
just 3" {w) x 3-1/4" (d} x 4-3/8" (h). 
It is priced at $99.95 and is avail- 
able from your local amateur radio 
dealer. For more information, con- 
tact Amateur Radio Engineering, 
P.O. Box 169. Redmond WA 
98073; (206) 882-2837, Fax: (206) 
861-5780. Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 203. 



66 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ 



NOG 

NCG/COMET Antenna has re^ 
leased the CX-224 2m/220/440 
MHz T riband Mobile Antenna, the 
first ever with gain. The high-qual- 
ity construction and materials 
COMET is known for are used to 
create a durable antenna with ex- 
cellent appearance and perform- 
ance. The CX-224 radiates 1/2 
wave on 2m with 2.15 dBi gain, a 
5/8 wave on 220 MHz with 3.2 dBi 
gain, and 2-5/8 waves on 440 MHz 
with 5.5 dBi gain. It is 37" long and 
is made with a hinged base to al- 
low the element to fold over. It has 
a PL-259 connector, and is also 
available with an NMO connector 

May, 1992 



(CX-224NMO). A triplexer is also 
available: CFX-324A has coax 
leads, CFX-324B does not; both 
have UHF connectors. This new 
antenna and triptexer are now 
available from most amateur radio 
dealers, along with a wide variety 
of trunk-lip, hatch-back and rain- 
gutter mounts for easy installa- 
tions. 

The introductory price for the 
CX-224 is $79,95, For more infor- 
mation, contact NCG t 1275 North 
Grove St $ Anaheim CA 92806; 
(714) 630-4541, Fax: (714) 630- 
7024. Or circle Reader Service 
No. 202. 



MOUSER ELECTRONICS 

Mouser Electronics has re- 
leased a new purchasing man- 
ual, #570. This comprehensive 
reference guide provides up-to- 
date product data and pricing 
on over 36,000 electronic compo- 
nents and over 80 manufacturers, 
Product index tabs are provided 
for locating particular products 
quickly.There Is a quick index 
on the front cover. To order your 
free copy of this catalog, contact 
Mouser Electronics, P.O. Box 
699 t Mansfield TX 76063; 
(817) 483-0165, (800) 992-9943, 
Fax: (817) 483-8157. Or circle 
Reader Service No. 204, 



1992 CALL DIRECTORY 

(On Microfiche) 

CafJ Directory * .$10 

Name Index 10 

Geographic Index 10 

AH three — $25 
Shipping per order $3 

BUCKMASTER PUBLISHING 

Mineral. Virginia 23117 

703: 094-5777 800: 282-5628 

CIRCLE 170 (W READER SERVICE CARD 





SRC- 10 

REPEATER/LINK 

CONTROLLER 






;* v N> 



DTMF muting 

Intelligent ID er 

Auxiliary outputs 

Easy to interface 

Alarm monitor input 

Ta4ttm*iry rfr4pOrtie lones 

power CMOS, 22mg @ 12> 

Detailed spoliation rnarcuai 

Program ma Die COS polarities 

Rip— if 1 ink courtesy ton** 

$yn1h**J2*d li ah /remote base capability 

$149.00 M °%£" 

CREATIVE CONTROL PRODUCTS 

}tB& BunUng Avenue 
Grand Junction CO f 1 
(50 J) 434-9405 



CIRCLE 146 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




- Urrofcrtrusiv* 

♦ Entry Concealed 

■ Snape on HvxBwM 

- Welfirra tnh/ Uoi 

* Adds No Built or H*tght 

Anttnmi$\\'e*t 



>ax; a *>*vft tT 



Range Extender for 
2 meter Handhekfs 

1 B>OOQS» S^nal frOfti = !** 

A 1 .-4 warn Ars&rinas 
1 Lowers Radiation Angi» 
• [apron i both Racwve 

■ Rum Lo* Power 

'&■¥•* your 6a£Se*> Pae» 
Orttor Hotiinr 
1-flOO-S26~7373 



I /„ Sfr# and Hear the Difference y* ^ 

ORCLE 107 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




TOUCH TONE DECODER: 

Decodes DTMF 
tones from audio 
source, (tape, 
phone, radio). 
Displays 
numbers on LCD 
display, 200 
Digit memory, 
T-2000 $169 ppd. USA 

SURVEELLANCE/- 
COUNTERSURVEILLANCE 

catalog $5. 

EMC0M 

10 HOWARD ^BUFFALO, NY 142M 

(716) 852-3711 




Amateur Radio 
Language Guide 

* Written especially for the ham rad* operator 

* Hundreds of phrases * Vol. 1— ind. French, 
Spanish, German. Japanese. Poifen • V«i 2- 
■ncl S*«li&n r n.alan Portuguese. Croanan, 
Norwegian Vol. $—>nci Russian, Danish. 

Czech. Korean. Hawaii ONLY SI 
SrtttOpfrtfL in U S foots** U S *i2iC per vd) 
ROSE. P.O. Box 796, Mundelem. !L 60060-0796 

CIRCLE 134 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



j Speak 
To 
The 
World 



\ 



Say You Saw 
It in 73! 




Factory Authorized Dealer & Service For 

KENWOOD 

YAESU 

ICOM 



Call Us Far 
Great Prices & Great Service 

TOLL FREE OH D£ft UWE 1-300-34*0144 

US IT* 



HAM 



CENTHR 



SALLS AMATEUR RADIO SEXWCl 



STXMooud S*n Antonio, TX7B238 <512>«WH0 
FAK £12$ 5*7-8007 






I 



i |* JhJ l -, k -i\ 



1991 



ARC SYSTEMS 

AMATEUR RADIO COMPUTER 



1 



Suited For Setting Up a 
Satellite Data Reception System 

Full Range of Rack Mount CPU Equipment 

Also Available - Stinger SCA- 1 Chassis 
The Ultimate in RFI Containment & Functionality 

General SpeciftcaHoriB 



Orpjtizc your station 
Utilize vertical space 
Consolidate components 



306, 4flG, ISA, EISAMilttiertioQrds 

Mounts Full and Baby Beards 

Up In 6 HH Drives 

1 1 0CFftf Coolm t) Fan 

Optional Expansion Slol Fan 

Front Switch^s/Locks/LEDs 

3FJ0W Swttehing Pwr Supply 

Low .Votsc Regirkirctfs 



* Convert current CPU to rack 
- Easy access tor servicing 

* Configure to your needs 



Aisoavafta 
sures The 



lustry p r ove n Sti r j| rack enck 

ttc 4e enchwure ftr f tainmem\ star- 

: capacity, ruggedness and role application. 

You see, SSi us Systems Integration Hoys^ - e commitment 
is Performance and Com^x: - not just etnr. rtfs. We design 
like otter foiKs only tiream of. Whether you need a superior quality 
chassis to build on or upgrade to, or one of our My confipred sys^ 
terns, 8S1 is your source for quality 19" rack computer equipment. 

if you haven't heard aoout us, maybe its time you did. 

Give us a call 



X 



/ 



Szfmi&t. 



SCO 




— ....- 




■■ t' ■. is hi i.i i' 

i" n <\ ii i.v n 

l I - lilt 



1 800 477-UNIX 




Cfotted vutlh prloe in ihe U^A 

01992 Sesrvuay Systems, mc. AH rights r«Hfr«d, 

r? ademartis belong \a "asaectrtrt owners. 



Sestway Systems. Inc. 

399 Central Park Avenue 

Yankfcre, NY 1 0704 

bl New York State dial: 914 968 9491 

Faa: 914 968 9623 



CIRCLE 74 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today » May, 1992 67 



As 



Number 22 on your Feedback card 



K K A BOOM 



Michael J. GeierKBWM 
% 73 Magazine 
Forest Rd, 
Hancock NH 03449 

Brain Twisters 

Well, I knew 1 was opening a can of 
worms when ( started the topics of 
modulation and receivers. Folks, the 
definition of what is going on in modu- 
lation has always been somewhat con- 
troversial. John WR0W wrote to take 
me to task on several issues. He points 
out that the math can be shown to 
prove that in AM r the carrier does in 
fact change amplitude, and also that it 
does not! It all depends upon how you 
look at it. Physically, the same is true. If 
you look at a modulated AM signal on 
an oscilloscope, which shows you am- 
plitude versus time, it seems quite 
clear that the whole si gnat is changing 
amplitude, all the way down to zero at 
times. Yet, if you look at that same 
signal on a spectrum analyzer, which 
shows you amplitude versus frequen- 
cy, you can see the unvarying carrier 
and the two varying sidebands. How 
can they both be true? 

Perhaps they can be. Consider this: 
Modulation changes the shape of the 
carrier wave; if it is changing ampli- 
tude, the individual waves can't be per- 



The Tech Answer Man 



feet sine waves anymore because one 
side must be getting bigger or smaller. 
Such changing shapes, when not dif- 
ferentiated by how their energy is 
spread across various frequencies (as 
they would be in a spectrum graph), 
form a net result of change of ampli- 
tude of the total signal, as the oscillo- 
scope shows. But, when we examine 
the effects of the shape changes by 
how the resultant energy is spread 
across the spectrum (using the spec- 
trum analyzer), it appears that the part 
of the total energy that is purely sinu- 
soidal (and thus unmodulated) is not 
changing. OK, I know I'm only adding 
more controversy, folks. Please don't 
write complaining about this attempt 
at an explanation. No one else has 
ever resolved the issue, and I sure 
don't expect to be the first! But, as 
you can see, modulation is rather 
complex. And, as John points out, FM 
is even more complex when subjected 
to mathematical analysis. Thanks, 
John, for some thought-provoking 
points, 

By the way, John, I, too, have heard 
very conflicting reports about the 
proper care of NiCd batteries. The 
"'smart discharger" idea seems great 
to me, but knowtedgabfe industry 
folks say no, no, no I The information I 



presented on the subject came from 
many years of experience with the an- 
noying tittle buggers. I, for one, can't 
wait for nickel-hydride or some other 
new technology to obsolete NiCds 
once and for all. 

FM-SSB? 

Here's another brain twister: SSB 
transmitters can be used for a kind of 
FM. and hams do it ail the time. Say 
what? 

It's true. SSB, which really changes 
the shape of the carrier in strange 
ways, has an odd characteristic. If you 
feed a pure audio sine wave into an 
SSB transmitter, all you get out is a 
pure carrier, offset from the dial fre- 
quency by the frequency of the audio 
tone! So, what happens if you vary the 
frequency of the audio tone? You 
guessed it, it makes the transmitter's 
frequency wiggle along with it, Yup, 
FMi Well, not exactly. In real FM, the 
carrier frequency deviates proportion- 
ally to the amplitude of the audio sig- 
nal, not its frequency. But the output of 
this FM-SSB is just like FM as far as 
thespectrum is concerned; it's a wig- 
gling carrier of constant amplitude. So 
where do we use it? Well, RTTY, which 
is Frequency Shift Keying, is a form of 
two-state FM. It's either at one frequen- 
cy or the other, with the two frequen- 
cies representing digital ones and ze- 
ros, or n mark TS and "space." 

FSKvs.AFSK 

True FSK is produced by making the 
on-off voftages which represent the di- 



gital data directly shift the transmitter's 
frequency back and forth between the 
two values. This can be done by 
switching between two oscillators or, 
perhaps, shifting a PLL Probably the 
most common method is to use a var« 
actor diode (varicap). It really doesn't 
matter. 

AFSK, which I suspect is more com- 
monly used these days, relies on the 
FM-SSB technique I just described: 
Audio tones are fed into the transmit- 
ter, forcing it to produce a carrier which 
follows the tones. 

Spectrally, the two techniques pro- 
duce exactly the same result, but 
there's a difference in operation. With 
true FSK, your frequency display 
shows one of the two frequencies be- 
ing used (usually "space," or digital 
zero). With A FSK, your display is offset 
from the frequencies you are actually 
putting out because they are both the 
result of modulation. Thus, they are \r\ 
the sideband area. So, if you are on 
14,080 MHz AFSK (USB), you are actu- 
ally transmitting around 14.082 MHz, 
Keep that in mind if you should wander 
near the band edges. Just like on SSB, 
you must keep all your sideband emis- 
sions within the band. Even with true 
FSK, you must consider the two fre- 
quencies being generated and the 
sidebands resulting from their genera- 
tion. A 170-Hz-shift signal is wider than 
170 Hz, because it is modulated with 
the data! 

SSTV is a more complex case, in 
that mode, a constant-amplitude sine 
wave audio tone is made to frequency 



STANDARD 

AMATEUR RADIOS 



Now available - The worlds finest amateur 
radios. Unsurpassed quality and features make 
STANDARD the worlds most popular line of 
amateur radios. 



Mini Deluxe HTs: 

C168A2meter 
C468 A 450MHz 



Call For 
Price 



Twin Band HTs 

C228 A 2M/220MHz c *ii For 
C528A 2M/440MHz *"* 
C628A 440MHz & 1,2GHz 



Twin Band Mobile 

C5608DA 2M/440MHz 

Call For Price 

We also have many accessories for 
these radios and most heath radios* 
Call 1-800-292-7711 for details. 



C &S SALES, INC, * 1245 Rosewood, Deerfieid, IL 60015 

(709) 541-3800 # FAX: 708-520-0085 ' WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 

WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD prices subject to chakge- 




PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



CIRCLE 160 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

68 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 



You 
can 
sub- 
scribe 
to 

73 

by 
phone. 

Call 
1-800- 

289- 
0388. 



A Wide Sel ect ion of 
ARRL BOOKS 

are available from 

Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf. 

See pages 86-87 of this issue 

and order the best of ARRL today! 




Micro Video Camera 



Small size l"x2 n 3[ 3" 

Light Weight < 4az. Low 

Power 7-15 volts. @ 

85ma. Low Light @ 2 

Lux. Camera comes com 4 

plet in metal case with 

RCA plug for video out 

and two pigtaled power 

wires. Camera Is presently in use in R/C 

airplanes, helicopters, cars, tanks and 

robots. Camera output is standard 

NTSC at lv p-p, 240 line resolution with 

electronic Iris, Pull stock on hand. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed! 

Factory New, only $ 229.95 + $6 

s/H For product information and 
ordering; Call 1 (800)473-0538 

MICRO VIDEO PRODUCTS 

1334 So. Shawnee Dr. Santa Ana, 
California, zip 92704 FAX (714) 545-8041 



CIRCLE 30 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



modulate in step with the amplitude of 
Ihe slowed-down video signal. Then 
that "audio FM" signal is applied to the 
SSB transmitter, making it frequency 
modulate with the frequency of the au- 
dio, as described above. The result is 
that the transmitter's output frequency 
wiggles in step with the original video 
signal's amplitude. That, my friends, is 
real FM. On SSB. On 20 meters. Per- 
fectly legal, too. And it occupies well 
under the allowed 3 kHz bandwidth, so 
why not? If it weren't for this system, 
252SSTV would be dam near impossi- 
ble, because the fading, QRM and stat- 
ic would make the video un watch able. 
All In all, ft T s pretty clever. 

FM Voice Level 

When signals get weak, there's a 
natural tendency to talk fonder. It 
makes intuitive sense: If someone 
can't hear you, yellJ Actually, it kind of 
works, up to a point, on SSB. The ALC 
circuit in the transmitter keeps the 
loudest speech sounds from overdriv- 
ing the output (at least it's supposed 
to), while the softer sounds are raised 
in level. Sounds like a speech proces- 
sor, doesn't it? On FM, however, the 
situation is much different. Before we 
get to why, we need to took at FM a little 
more. 

How Big Does It Get? 

With FM, there fs no theoretical max- 
imum modulation as there is with AM 
and SSB. After all, it's just the frequen- 
cy of the carrier wiggling , and we can 
wiggle it as far as we want, right? In 



practice, there are limits to how far rt 
can go because the tuned RF amplifi- 
ers have bandwidth limits. But those 
limits can be pretty wide, so we can 
ignore them here. 

Without some circuitry to limil the 
mike gain , we can deviate an FM trans- 
mitter into infinity. So just what is 
"maximum" modulation in an FM sys- 
tem? It corresponds to the maximum 
deviation which can be turned into a 
linear change in the recovered audio 
voltage in the receiver's detector, This 



the transmitting modulator and the re- 
ceiver's front end represents a smaller 
percentage of the total. Obviously, if 
you have 500 Hz maximum deviation (a 
ridiculously small amount), then a ran- 
dom deviation of, say f 2 Hz is much 
more serious than if maximum devia- 
tion is 15 kHz. So why not use lots of 
deviation? Two reasons, 

Ffrst, it takes up lots of bandwidth. 
Ever wonder why commercial FM sta- 
tions are spaced at least 200 kHz 
apart? Commercial stations use lots of 



"Here's another brain twister: 

SSB transmitters can be used for a 

kind of FM, and hams do it ait the time. 

Say what?" 



limit is set by the design of the receiver, 
not by any Inherent theoretical charac- 
teristic of the transmitter. If the trans- 
mitter deviates farther than the receiv- 
er is designed to accept, it will cause 
terrible distortion due to the detector's 
being unable to remain linear at the 
extremes. Heck, everything has some 
limitsl 

The wider the deviation; the lower 
the noise level, provided there is plenty 
of signal, That's because apparent 
random devfation caused by noise in 



deviation, thus lots of bandwidth. Let's 
see, we could fit 20 stations on 2 me- 
ters. . .not too good. 

Second, it makes the signal appear 
much weaker at the recefver because 
the available energy is being spread 
over much wider bandwidth, making 
the amount at any one frequency much 
less. That's why your favorite FM rock 
station needs those 100,000 watts to 
be clearly heard for a 30- mile radius, 
while you can hear a 100- watt repeater 
50 or more miles away. By using nar- 



row bandwidth, we greatly expand 
range at the expense of fidelity. 

Here's the Why 

And that's why yelling on a weak 
FM link actually makes you hard&r 
to hear! Have you ever noticed that 
a weak FM signal, amateur or com- 
mercial, gets the most distorted on au- 
dio peaks? Just when the cymbal 
crashes or the voice is the loudest, 
it sounds the worst. When you deviate 
your transmitter to the max T your trans- 
mitter's energy is spread wider, so 
it seems weaker. Of course, if you 
whisper, you may be lost in the noise 
of the weak reception. There is an 
optimum level, and it is best found 
through experimentation with your par- 
ticular rig. Next time you're real 
scratchy into the repeater, try talking a 
little bit softer and I'll bet you get heard 
better! By the way, I have never heard 
anyone but myself do this, but I 
promise, it works, 

One Last Brain Twister 

You've probably heard this one: At 
certain audio modulating frequencies, 
the carrier in an FM transmitter actually 
disappears! Yes T it does, but that does 
not mean that the transmitter's output 
signal disappears! Before you go grab- 
bing the antenna to see if it is true, 
consider this: The transmitter is slill 
putting cut full power— it's all in the 
sidebands. You still don't want to touch 
it, Ouch! 

73 and see you all next month! de 
KB1UM. 



TOLL 



1-800-666-0908 



PRICING AND ORDERS ONLY 



KENWOOD 





-rs-tsa&AT 



™-741A 



TH-HA 







FT-KSCl 



FT-47& 



,^ H ^jK8» x ?8S**fI'"¥* 1 







Full KENWOOD line 
Radios & Accessories 



AUNCO 




DR-590T 



FuFI line of Radios 
and Accessories 




C2ZBA 



STANDARD 



Full line of Radios 
and Accessories 



FT-?S7QXll 



Call for All YAESU 
Radios & Accessories 



o 
(COM 




IC-W2A 



IC-Z29H 

Fun ICOM line 
Radios & Accessories 




IC-735 



AEA • ASTRON • COMET * CUSHCRAFT- DIAMOND • KANTRONICS * MFJ 
• SANGEAN * SONY SHORTWAVE • DRAKE • MANY MORE. . . 



NEW EQUIPMENT PRICING AND ORDERS 1-800-666-0908 OUT OF STATE 
TECHNICAL, USED GEAR, INFO 203-666-6227 24HR FAX 203-667-3561 



LENTINI COMMUNICATIONS INC. 

21 GARFIELD STREET. NEWtNGTON, CT061U 
Hours: M-F 10-6. C.O.D.s Same Day 



SAT. 10-4 



OK Shipping 



OCEAN STATE ELECTRONICS 



DELUX CODE KEY 

Adjustable, heavy duly brass base with ball 
bearing pivots. Designed 
for ha rd usage. 3/1 6" 
plated contacts. 

$11.75 




MASTERING 
THE MORSE CODE 

This book teaches the beginn&r how to team the 
Mo rse C ode. Some of th e topics covered a re Ru tes 
for practicing the Morse Code, the code alphabet, 
how to &end and receive code, how to build and 
hook up a code practice oscillator. 32 pages. 

$2 50 



CODE PRACTICE 

OSCILLATOR & MONITOR IN 
KIT FORM OR WIRED 

A solid-state code practice oscillator and monrtor 
that uses the latest I C circuitry It contains a 3" 
built-in speaker headphone terminals, a volume 
control and a tone control. It is a attractively 
packaged with a two color panel. With the addition 
of a few parts, the unit can easily be con verted into 

CW monilor. It can therefore 
be used as an operating aid 
after the code has been 
learned. 

Wired $24.95 





0-1 MA 

EDGEWISE 

PANEL METER 

Very popular 0-1 MA edgewise meter. Used in 
many- projects. 200^A movement 0-1 scale. Two 
&ar flanges with holes for mounting, 
Measures 1 1/2"W x 7/fl"H x 1 VTD. 
Appro*. 1 7/6" mounting ce raters. $3.75 



REGULATED POWER 
SUPPLIES 13.8 VDC 

Perfect for ham equipment, C8's. car stereo's 
and other 13.8 VDC items. LED on indicator, 
short circuit protection. Binding post output. 

3 AMP $29.50 

4 AMP $39.50 

6 AMP ...$46.50 

10 AMP $79.50 

20 AMP. ..$119.50 
25 AMP.. .$129.50 




r 



/ 



COPPER CLAD 
PC BOARD 

One o£. copper (.0024*) on 
phenolic !Mise Popular 5" x 7" size. 

$1.50 




VERNIER DIALS 

1-1/2" Dia. 0-10 ..$8.25 
1-1/2" Dia. 0-100 $9.25 
2" Dia. 0-100 .,„ $10.25 



TO ORDER 



CALL 1*800-866-6626 OR WRITE 

OCEAN STATE ELECTRONICS 

P T 0. Box 1458 
Westerly, R.I. 02891 




Min. order $10. 00 
Include $4 00 SM 




R I. Residents add 7% Safes Tax 
ORDERS RECEIVED BY 1 :W PM EST- 
SHIP SAME DAY! 



CALL 1-401 596-3080 OR WRITE 
FOR FREE 112 PAGE CATALOG 



CIRCLE 227 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 234 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Number 23 on your Feedback card 



PECIAL EVENTS 

Ham Doings Around the World 



Listings are free of charge as space permits. Please send us your Special 
Event two months in advance of the issue you want it to appear in. For 
example, if you want it to appear in the January issue, we should receive it by 
October 31. Provide a dear, concise summary of the essential details about 
your Speciai Event. Check /MANIFESTS on our BBS (603-525-4438) for 
listings that were too late to get into publication. 



MAY 2 



GR AN D J U NCT ION T CO The Western Col- 
orado ARC will hold its annual Hamfest in Liff 
Auditorium at Mesa State College from 9 AM - 
2 PM, Seminars, VE Exams. Talk-in on 
146.94. Call Ernie N9GEO, (303)242-6035, 
or Bob NtOKL, (303) 434-8604 . 

EAST LIVEHPOOU OH The Triangle ARC 
will hold their first annual Hamfest at the Cal- 
cutta Fire Hall. Talk-in on 146.10/70 rptr 
Contact Dick Sistey K8JK3, Secretory, 
1213 Northside Ave,, East Liverpool OH 
43920. 

SONOMA, CA The Valley of the Moon ARC 
will hold its semi-annual "ham" and egg 
breakfast, VE exam h swap meet, ARRL Ham- 
fest, ATV, packet radio demonstration start- 
ing at 6:00 AM at the Sonoma Community 
Center, 276 Easl Napa St. Fishing in after- 
noon. VE exams will be walk-in with registra- 
tion at 1 0:00 AM. Testing at 1 1 :00 AM. Swap 
spaces $10, Breakfast $5. Admission free. 
Talk-inon 147.47 simplex and 144.75/145,35 
rptT.CantaQlDarrellWDGBQRat(7Q7} 996- 
4494. 



MAY 2-3 



ABILENE, TX The Key City ARC will spon- 
sor the ARRL West Texas Section Conven- 
tion and Hamfest at the Abilene Civic Center 
from S AM-5 PM Sat., and from 9 AM-3 FM 
Sun, Free parking. VE Exams. Wheelchair 
access, Tables $5 each. Pre- registration $£ 
(must be received by Apr. 28), $7 at the door 
Talk-In on 146,160/760. Contact Peg 
Richard KA4UPA, 1442 Lakeside Dr., 
Abilene TX 79602. (915) 672-9889. 

SIERRA VISTA, AZ The Cochise ARA will 
hold its annual Hamfest at the club training 

facility Drive 5 miles east of town on State 
RT, 90 and then 2 miles south on Meson Rd. 
VE exams. Overnight RV camping (no 
hookups) available to club members. Talk-in 
on 146.52 or 146 760 6). Handicap facilities. 
Contact N71NK (602) 378-3155 after 6 PM 
or write to CAR A, POBqx 1855, Sierra Vista 
AZ 85636, 



MAY 3 



ST. PETERSBURG, FL The St Petersburg 
ARC will sponsor a Hamfest at Lake Mag giore 
Park (9th St, & 38th Ave, So.) from 8 AM-1 
PM. Flea Market. Tailgating. Free Admission. 
Bring a picnic lunch and eat under the park 
shelters. Talk-in on 147.06 rptr, Lake Mag- 
giore Pork is a city park, so there will be no 
commercial dealers. Contact Robert Russeti 
N4ZMQ, (8 1 3) 896-25 1 8. 

NEW CASTLE, DE The Penn-Del ARC will 
Sponsor the Penn-Del Hamfest at the Nur 
Temple, 198 S, DuPont Hwy., (RT 13 near US 
40 split), from 8:30 AM-2 PM, rain or shine. 
Set-up at 7 AM. Indoor /outdoor reserved 
swap tables, tailgating, VE Exams, Commer- 
cial exhibitors. Indoor tables with electricity, 
$10; without electricity. $8. Outdoor tables 
are $6. Tailgating $5- General admission $4. 
Reservations required for swap tables: send 
check to PO Box 1964, Booth wyn PA 
19061 .Make checks payable to PENN-DEL 
ARC, For info call (215) 497-2124. 



MAY9 



MANITOWOC, Wi The Mancorad RC will 
sponsor a Ham/Computer/Flea Market at the 
Manitowoc County Expo Ctr., intersection of 
Hwys 42-151 and 1-43 on Co. R. from 8 AM- 
3:30 PM. Set-up at 7 AM, VE Exams, all class- 
es. Camping available via Manitowoc Co* 
Expo Ctr., (414) $83-4378, Advance tickets 
$2, $3 at the door. &' tables $5 with outlet, $3 
without. Talk-in on 146.01/. 61. Contact: via 
SASE to Mancorad R.C., Box 204, Mani- 
towoc WI 54221-0204 or call (days) ' 'John" 
(414) 662-9151; {nights) "Lou" (414) 682- 
2557. 



MAY 10 



ATHENS, OH The Athens County ARA will 
hold its 13th annual Hamfest from B AM-3 PM 
at the City Recreation Center. Take the East 
St. exit on either US Route 33 or US Route 50, 
and look for signs to the Hamfest. Admission 
Is $4 a person, but in honor of Mother's Day, 
YLs and spouses of mate hams will be al- 
lowed in free. Free paved outdoor flea market 
space adjacent to building for lailgaters and 
those bringing their own tables the day of the 
event. Indoor space available by advance 



registration only To register, contact John 
Biddfe WD8JLM, 80 Wonder Hifts Dr., 
Athens OH 457Q1. (614) 594-8901 (after 6 
PM). Talk-in on the club rptr. at 145,15+ 
MHz. For info write to Carl J. Denbow 
KA3JXG, 63 Morris Ave., Athens OH 
45701-1939. 

WHEAT ON, IL GMRS of Illinois, Inc , will 
hold their Bi-annual Fest from 8 AM-1 PM at 
the DuPage County Fairgrounds* 
Manchester Rd, Set-up will begin at 6 AM, 
Advance tickets $4; $5 at the door. Tables 
$10 each. Free outdoor Flea Market spaces. 
Ladies admitted free. For info call Bob, (708) 
690-1492. 



MAY 15-17 



VENTURA, CA The 1992 West Coast VHF/ 
UHF Confer ence r sponsored by the Ventura 
County ARC, will be held at the Holiday Inn on 
the Beach, 450 East Harbor Blvd. Free park- 
ing. Take advantage of the special hotel Con- 
ference Rate of oniy $65 per night, double 
occupancy (plus room tax). Be sure to men- 
tion the conference. Offer valid until May 1. 
Hotel reservations: 1-800^842-0800. Sat. 
night Banquet S25 (pre-register only). Sun. 
morning Breakfast, $10, No-Code Tech class 
and Exams, call (714) 979-2833. There will 
be a list of proceedings available at the Con- 
ference for $10. Make checks payable to 
Ventura County ARC and mail payment to 
VCARC, PO Box 2103, Oxnard CA 93033. 
For info call (805) 047-4294. No refunds after 
May 6. For exhibit space call (805} 264- 
1978. 



MAV 16 



COLORADO SPRINGS, CO Pikes Peak 
RAA will host the largest Ham-Computer 
Swap in Colorado from 8 AM-4 PM, Admis- 
sion $3. Tables $10 Contact At N&CMWor 
Frances N61UT, (719) 473-1680. Write: 
PPRAA, PO Box 16521 j Colorado Springs 
CO 80935. VE Exams, Free Parking. Take 
Filmore Exit East off I-25 to Union, then right 
to Mega-Mart, 1801 Union Blvd. Talk-In on 
l46,37/,97 or 146.52, 

EPHRATA, PA The Lancaster County 
Hamfest, sponsored by the Ephrata Area Re- 
peater Society, Inc., will be held at the 
Ephrata Senior High School, 803 Oak Blvd., 
beginning at 8 AM. Set-up at 6:30 AM. All 
sites handicap accessible. VE Exams at 9 
AM. Admission $4. Tailgating $3. Inside ta- 
bles $6. Talk-in on 145.45 MHz, 146.52 MHz 
and 444.85 MHz. For info and reserve! ions, 
cail Tom Youngberg K3RZF, (215} 267- 
2514 after 6 PM; or write E.A.R.S., 906 
Ctearview Ave.. Ephrata PA 17522. 

CADILLAC, Ml The Wexaukee ARA will 
hold their annual Swap and Shop ai the Cadil- 
lac Middle School, 500 Chestnut St, from 8 
AM-1 PM, Admission $3. Tables $6. Talk-in 
on 146.38/98 rptr. Call Dan Schmidt 
KE8KU, (616) 775-0998; or write Wexaukee 
ARA, PO Box 1 63, Cadillac Ml 49601 -Of 63, 

NO. SMITHFJELD, Rl The Rhode Island 
Amateur FM Repeater Service, Inc., will hold 

their annual Spring Auction and Flea Market 
at the VFW Post 6342, Main St., beginning at 
& AM, Take the Forestdale exit off Route 1 46 
in No, Smithfield, take a left at the end of the 
ramp and go six tenths of a mile to the Post 
(on your right just before the Village Haven 
Restaurant). Flea Market spaces $5 each. 
There will be an auction from 11 AM-3 PM. 
Donation $1. Talk-in on 146.76. For info con- 
tact Rtck Fairweather K1KY1, 106 Chaplin 
St., Pawtucket Rt 02861 « or call (401) 725- 
7S07 between 7 and 6 PM. 

AM EN I A, NY A Hamfest sponsored by the 
Sou I hern Berkshire ARC. will be held at the 
Amenia NY Fire house (US Rte44or NY 22 to 
Amenia stoplight, east on 343 one block to 
Mechanic St* to the fi rehouse. From Con- 
necticut, west on Rte 4 to Sharon f then west 
on 343 to Amenia, Pavilion tables $4, Admis- 
sion $3. Talk-in on 1 47.285/385, SASE to Ed 
Wilbur WB1CEI, PO Box 547, Sharon CT 
06069. (203) 384-5208 eves. 

KLAMATH FALLS, OR The First Annual 
South Central Oregon Hamfest will be held at 
the Oregon Institute of Technology campus. 
Exhibitor booths. Flea Market tables, lasers, 
and license exams for all classes, are among 
the events planned. 1 0' tables 51 each. Con- 
tact Hollis Kiger W7UFM> (503) 8&2-S129qt 
Dick SwitzerKB7DWX f ($03) 852-1300. 



MARSHALLTOWN, IA The Central Iowa 
RAS will hold lis Hamfest at the Marshalltown 
Community College-IM mile south of HWY 
30 just east of HWY 14, Talk-in on 146.2B/ BB. 
VE exams, sign up at 10:00 AM-2 PM. For 
info call Chuck Dennis WB8ZKG* Toledo iA. 
(515) 484-4837. Tickets $3 in advance and 
$4 at the gate. Call or write Charles Lynk 
W8DYS, 2460 Reed Ave. t Marshalltown I A 
50156. (515) 783-692S or Brian Krumm 
N6MXK. 911 South 8th Ave. t Marshalltown 
IA 50159, (515) 752-9858. Tailgating. 



MAY te -17 



HARTWELL, GA The Lake Hartwell Ham- 
test will be held at Hartwell Group Camp Sat. 
and Sun. ARRL sponsored VE Exams for all 
classes will be held on Sat the 1 6th. 

BIRMINGHAM, AL The BirmingHamfest 
will be held indoors at the Birmingham-Jeffer- 
son Civic Center. TalMn on W4CUE/R, 
146.880 MHz. Commercial exhibitors. Flea 
market, Electronic equipment, Awards, Ama- 
teur radio license tests (Sunday only). Adult 
admission S5. Reservations and information, 
Write: BirmingHamfest '92, PO Box 94775, 
Birmingham, AI 35220 or call (205) 979- 
7039 



May 17 



WHEELING, WV The Triple States RAC will 
sponsor the 1992 TSR AC Wheeling Hamfest/ 
Computer Fair from Q AM-3 PM at Wheeling 
Park. 

QUEENS, NY The Hall of Science ARC 
Hamfest will be held at the New York Hall of 
Science parking lot—Flushing Meadow Park, 
47-01 1 1 1th St„ Queens NY, Doors open for 
Vendors to set-up at 7:30 AM; Buyers admit- 
ted at 9 AM. Free Parking, Admission by do- 
nation; Buyers $5, Sellers $8 per space. Talk- 
in on 445.175 NB2A rptr, Contaci {eves) 
Charles Becker WA2JUJ, (516) 894-3955 
or Arnie Schifiman WB2YXB r (718) 343- 
0172. 

CAMBRIDGE , M A The M IT Electron ics Re- 
search Society, the MIT Radio Society, and 
the Harvard Wireless Club will co-sponsor a 
Tailgate Flea Market for electronics, comput- 
er and amateur radio, from 9 AM-2 FM {rain 
or shine) at Albany and Main St, Free off- 
street parking. Covered tailgate area for 400 
sellers, $S per space at the gate; $5 in ad- 
vance {Includes 1 admission). Set-up at 7 AM. 
For reservations or info call (617)253-3776, 
Mail advance reservations before May 5th to 
W1GSL. PO Box 82 MIT BR., Cambridge 
MA 02139. Talk-in on 146,52 and 449,725/ 
444.725-pi2A.W1XM rptr, 

SACRAMENTO T CA The North Hills RC will 
hold Hamfest "92, starting at 6 AM PST, at the 
Carmichael Elk's Lodge at Hackberry Lane 
and Cypress Ave, Talk- in will be on the K6IS 
rptrs, on 145.190 MHz and 224.400 MH2, In- 
side tables and outside spaces are available, 
There will be demonstrations of Oscar, Pack- 
et, and ATV. Admission $1. This is the BIG 
ONE in the Sacramento Valley Section. 



May 17-19 



PEOTONE, IL The Kankakee ARS will hold 
its annual Hamfest at the Will County Fair- 
grounds on May 19 from 8 AM-2 PM. Indoor 
exhibit area, ARRL booth, large outdoor flea 
market. Free Parking. Set-up May 17 from 6 
AM-Q AM. Admission ¥350 in advance, 14.00 
at the door. Take 1-57 south of Chicago. Exit 
327 east to Feotone. Fairgrounds one mile on 
left. Talk-in on 146.34/94. More information 
from KARS C/O Frank DalCanton 
KA9PWW, 117Krl$tinaDr t Bourbonnais. 
IL 60914. (815) 932-5950 after 7 PMCST 



May 22-24 



TULSA, OK The Green Country Hamfest 
will be held at the Maxwell Convention Center 
in down-town Tulsa, located on W. 7th St 
between Denver and Houston Avenues. 
Large indoor flea market, new equipment 
dealers, forums, VE, exams,, alternate activi- 
ties for non-amateurs. Admission $8 in ad- 
vance/$l0 at the door. Free parking. Flea 
market tables 56 in advance and $8 at the 
door. RV parking. Talk-in on 146.28/85 Tulsa 
Rptr. Hamfest information (919) 272-3081. 
PO Box 470132 Tulsa, OK. 74147-0132 



May 23-24 



YAKIMA, WA The Yakima ARC W7AQ will 
sponsor the Washington State Hamfest and 



the 1 &t Annual NW Packet Radio Conference. 
Seminars for all levels of packet radio. VE 
testing ror all levels on Saturday, May 23rd at 
1:30 PM. Walk-ins will be accepted. New 
dealer displays as well as swap/shop tables. 
Early Bird Breakfast, Sat. and Sun. at 7:30 
AM Banquet Saturday evening at 6:30 PM. 
Cost $10,50 per person. Talk-in on 146.06/ 
.66. Take 16th Ave. exit off HWY 12, South on 
16th to Chestnut Ave., East on Chestnut to 
14th, South on 14th to Entrance of St. Pauls 
School Gym. Admission $5 in advance. $6 at 
the door. Contact Dick Umberger N7HHU, 
W7AQ Yakima ARC f PO Box 9211, Yakima, 
WA 93909, (509) 453-8632 days. 



May 24 



YOUNGSTQWH, OH The Twenty Over 
Mine Radio Club is sponsoring a Hamfest at 
the Canfield Fairgrounds from 8 AM-3 PM. 
Tickets are $3 in advance and $4 at the door. 
Indoor tables are $8. Flea market $1 . Security 
provided. Free parking. Talk- in on 147.315. 
For di rection s 1 45 275 . Contact Twenty Nine 
Radio Club, 42 South Whitney, Youngs- 
town OH 44509. 



May 31 



hftlLFORO, CT This Schedule for 1992 Ex- 
arns-By the Coastline ARA, All class Exams, 
Contact: Gary NB1M (203) 933-5125-West 
Haven or Dick WA1YQE (203) 874-1014* 
Mllford. Place: Fowler Buiiding, 145 Bridge- 
port Ave., Milford CT Time: 12 Noon Walk- 
Ins. 



JuneS 



TEANECK, NJ The ARRL Hudson Division 
Convention Co^Sponsored by the Bergen 
ARA, Radio Amateur Telecommunications 
Society, and the Hudson ARC will be held at 
the Fairleigh Dickinson University from 
7:0OAM-4:O0PM. ARRL and FCC forums, 
technical seminars, VE testing, Hamfest. Ad- 
mission $5, children under 12 free. Vending 
space $30 per indoor space, $10 outdoor tail- 
gating space, $25 per outdoor space with 
power. From NYC take Rl. 4 West to River Rd. 
exit in Teaneck, follow signs to convention. 
From Rt, 4 East, take River Rd, exit and follow 
signs. Talk-in on 146.790-6 and 146.70O-6. 
Contact Mm Joyce K226, (201) 664-6725. 
For VE info, call Pefe Adety K2MHP, (201) 
796-8622, Please, no calls after 10 PM, 



June 7 



CHELSEA, Ml The Chelsea ARC will spon- 
sor a SWAP 'N SHOP Talk-in: 146 960 
Chealsea Rptr 8 ' tables $9, trunk sale $3 per 
space, special handicapped parking. Gates 
open at 6:00 AM for sellers. Donation: $3. 
YL'S, XYL^ Sl kids under 12 free. Ladies 
tables welcome. For more info send SASE or 
call (313) 475-1795, Robert Schanti, 416 
Wilkinson Street, Chelsea Ml 48118. 

NEWINGTON, CT The Newington ARL will 
hold its annual amateur radio and computer 
hamfest from 9:00 AM-2 PM at Newington 
H ig h Sen ool, Rte , 1 73 ( Willard A ve . ) j u&t north 
of Rts. 173 (Cedar St) Tailgating (weather 
permitting), refreshments, guided tours of 
ARRL HO and W1AW. VE exams (no walk- 
ins}. Talk-in on 144.65/145.45, 223,24/ 
224.34, 443.05/448.05, 146,52, Admission 
£3, Tables $10 in advance, $15 at the door. 
Contact Les Andrew KA1KRP, c/o NARL, 
88 Wiidermere Ave., Waterbury CT 06705, 
(203) 523-0453 (SASE for confirmation). 
Exam Appointments: SASE to Susan 
Fredrickson WM1B W PO Box 165, Pleasant 
Valley CT 08062. 

MANASSAS, VA The Oie Virginia Hams 
ARC will sponsor the Manassas Hamfest and 
Computer Show at the William County Fair- 
grounds. Take 166 west to flte. 234 then 
south on 234 to Fairgrounds. Open to public 
at 6:00 AM, Tailgaters 7:00 AM. Admission $5 
each. Tailgating $5 additional per space. 
Wheelchair accessible. Talk-in on Manassas 
rptr, 146.37/ 97 and 223,06/224.66. Commer^ 
cial vendors contact Woody KD4DEG at 
(703) 368-5180. Contact Rosemary KI4 VO 
at (703) 361-5255. 

PITTSBURGH, PA The Breeze Shooters 
will host I heir 35th annual Hamfest/Comput- 
erfest at the Butler County Farm Show 
Grounds, on PA. RT. 66 west of Butler Ad- 
mission $1 per person at the gate. Free park- 
ing. Free tailgate vending. Handicapped 
parking Tables $10 each by prepaid reserva- 



70 73 Amateur Radio Today * May 1 1992 



tion. Contact Rey Whanger W3BtS t Box 8, 
RDM2, Cove Rood, Cheswick PA 15024. 
(412) 828-3694 

SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS 



May 1-2 



BAKER, CA The Ancient and Honorable 
Order Of E CI amp us Vitus, Billy Holcomb 
Chapter ARC will operate a special event sta- 
tion KC6LUC from 1700Z-040Q2 to com- 
memorate "The Historical Chicago to Los 
Angeles Route 66." Operations will be in the 
General 40, 20, 15 and the Novice portion of 
10 meters. For a Certificate, send QSL and 
5 ASF to ECVARC, 14S3 Albright Ave., Up- 
land, CA. 91788 



May 2-3 



MEMPHIS, TN The Mid-South ARA will op- 
erate W4EM May 2 13002-05002 May 3 to 
celebrate Memphis in May international Fes- 
tival. This year's honored country is Italy. Op- 
eration will be in the lower 50 kHz of the SSB 
General 80-12 meter and the Novice 10 me- 
ter subbands. For certificate, send QSL and a 
9x12 inch SASE to Mara W4EM t 2966 
Cordeit, Memphis TN 38118, 



May 6-7 



SIOUX CITY, IA The Siouxland ARA wilt 
operate KGAAR from 1500Z-2100Z to cele- 
brate the 120th anniversary of the 1500 mile 
Steamboat river race between The Nelle Peck 
and The Far West. Phone: 7.243, 14,255, 
21 .355, 28.355, For certificate send SASE to 
KflAAR, 3407 Jennings St., Sioux City JA 
51 104 



May B 



FRANK LIN , MA Tri Coon ty A R will operate 
WW1H 14OOZ-2100Z to Commemorate the 
T5th Anniversary of Tri County Regional Vo- 
cational Technical High School. Operations 
wi II be in the Iowa rend of the IOmeter Novice 
phone band and the 20 meter General phone 
band. For certificates, send QSL and a SASE 
to WW1H Tri County Amateur Radio, 147 
Pond Street, Franklin MA 02038, 



May 8-9 



FORT PIERCE, FL Tne Fort Pierce ARC will 
operate KN4RY; ieO0Z^23O0Z May 9 and 
1 40QZ-2 1 00Z May 9 to cornme morale the 5th 
Annual Traif Ride of the Florida Cracker Trail 
Assn. Operation will be In the 40, 20 P 1 5, and 
the Novice portion of the 10 meter phone 
band. For Certificates pfease send a QSL and 
large 9 x 12 SASE (2 units of postage) to 
W3DHN t 18 Cordillera, Fort Pierce FL 
349S1. 



May 9-10 



LAS VEGAS, NV The Nevada QSP Party 
sponsored by the Frontier ARS will be held 
from OOOOZ May 9 to 0G00Z May 10. Work 
stations once per band per mode. Exchange 
RS(T), and State/Province/Country (Nevada 
Stations also give county). Frequencies: 6 
through 160 meters modes-CW/SSB/BTTY/ 
SSTV/PACKET. Scoring^ 1 Pt. Phone GSO s 2 
Pt. other modes. Non-Nevada Stations multi- 
ply by number of Nevada Counties, Nevada 
Stations multiply by State/Pro vincefCountry 
Total, Awards-Certificates to top score each 
Stale/Provlnce/DXCC Country General and 
above, Novice & Tech. Mail Entry By June 1 , 
W92to:JlmFryeNW70, 4120 Oakhiil Ave. , 
Las Vegas, NV 89121. 

GRAYS HARBOR, WA The Grays Harbor 
ARC will be conducting a special events sta- 
tion commemorating the 200th anniversary of 
the discovery of Grays Harbor. On May 7th d 
1 792, Captain Robert Gray, in his ship Colum- 
bia, sailed into the harbor. Look for W7ZA 
from 0O0OZ, May 9th to 24O0Z May 10th on 
the bottom part of the General phone band on 
15 thro 60 meters, on Novice phone portion of 
10 meters and 40 up from the bottom of the 
CW bands on 10 thru 80. For a special QSL 
card please send your QSL card and a SASE 
(Legal Size) to:ARS:t(A7AlR Joe Ledesm&, 
5168th Street, Hoquiam, WA 98550. 

MOUNT VERNON, VA Members of the 
Mount Vernon ARC will operate 1 400^21 O0Z 
from locations on the original Mount Vernon 
estate of Georcje Washington to celebrate the 
250th anniversary of the founding of Fairfax 
County, VA. CW-7.130, 14,040, 21,110; 
Phone-7.227, 14.250> 21.325, 28.325; VHP 
voice 146.655; and VHF and HF packet on 
1 45.670 {DC A and WASH DC nodes). For cer- 
tificate, send QSL and a 9 x 12 inch or #10 
SASE to Steve Schneider WB4EEA, 8602 
Cushman Piece , Alexandria VA 22308. DX 
stations send 2 IRCs with QSL and SASE. 
QSL card confirmation will be sent in addition 
to certificate only if specifically requested. 



WALL TOWNSHIP, NJ The Ocean-Mon- 
mouth ARC will be sponsoring the Commem- 
oration of Marconi's Memorial Tower Radio 
Sight Circa 1914. Omarc will operate KC2Q 
from 1600Z on May 9 to 1900Z on May 10, 
Phone at the low end of the General portion of 
the 15-75 meter band, Novice portion of 10 
m eter band , C W will be on 3545 , 7045 , 1 4045 , 
21045 MHz. For flat certificate, send 1 green 
stamp, or SASE for folded, to Omarc, PO 
Box 75, Bradley Beach NJ 07728. Visitors 
welcome. Talk-in 145,110-600. 



May 10 



PROMONTORY, UT The Qgden ARC will 
operate KE7QV from driving of the Golden 
Spike, Promontory Summit. UT: operations 
will be from 0001Z-21QQZ on one of the fol- 
lowing: 3.970, 7.270. 14.280. 21,375. and 
28.415 MHz. Send QSL and SASE to Qgden 
ARC, PO Box 33S3 r Ogden UT 84409. 



May 13 



TOWNSVILLE, AUSTRALIA The National 
commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of 
the Battle of the Coral Sea. During May 1-13, 
a special event callsign, VHBCS (Victor India 
Four Battle Coral Sea), will be activated from 
the Club's premises at Green St.. West End, 
Townsville, A special QSL card will be avail- 
able for all QSOs to VI4BCS Ceiebrations 
include a troop train from Brisbane bringing 
300 ex-servicemen and women to Townsviiie, 
arrival of four United States Navy ships and 
Ihree Australian Navy Ships on May 8 to un- 
veil the $109,000 Coral Sea memorial in An- 
zac Park. Please phone Bob Mann VK4WJ 
on (077) 797869ox Roger Cordukes VK4CD 
on (077) 740221 or write to TARC tnc t P.O. 
Box 964, Townsvtfie, 4 $10 Australia. 
Packet Address: VK4WrK4AFS#NQ. 
QLD.AUS.OC 



May 14-15 



FORT MCCLELLAN, AL 1992 marks the 
Golden Anniversary of The WAC and the 
WAAC, The reunion will be held at the histori- 
cal home of the Women's Army Corps. This 
year's celebration honors Maj, Gen. Mary E, 
Clarke. Two-way radio communications on 
MARS and Amateur Radio frequencies. Cer- 
tificates will be awarded to all WAC r s and 
WAAC's who participate in the reunion on the 
air. A QSL card will be sent for the radio 
operators who assisted them. The station will 
operate on 20,350, 21.350, 14.285, 7.272, 
and 3.900 MHz using the calisign N4MOK. 
Contact the WAC Foundation at (205) 848- 
35 1 2 or the Fort McCletfan Army MA RS sta- 
tion at (205) 848-4818. 



May 1G-17 



GLASGOW, KY The Mammoth Cave ARC 
and the Kentucky Colonels ARC will operate 
KD4SS from Barren River State Park to com- 
memorate the Kentucky Bicentennial andean 
be found in the General portions of 10 thru so 
meters. Operation will begin at 1 700Z on May 
1 6-1700Z on May 1 7. QSL KD4SS, 309 East 
Main Street, Glasgow KY 42141, SASE 
please. 

RALEIGH, NC The Raleigh ARS will oper- 
ate W4DW to celebrate the bicentennial of the 
capita! city, from 1500 UTC-2200 UTC on 
both days. Operation will be in the General 
portion of the voice bands on 20, 40„ and 75 
meters, and the Novice portion of 10 meters. 
For commemorative QSL card send a #10 
SASE to RARS 200, PO Box 1 7124, Raleigh 
NC 27619. 

ST. CHAHLES, MO The St Charles ARC 
will operate WBBHSI from 1300Zto2100Zas 
part of the Lewis and Clark Rendezvous. We 
will transmit on 7265, 14265, 21365, 28465, 
146.67, and ACM 3 145 935 (mode 6) and 
435.970 (mode J) as propagation and QRM 
permit. For B.5 x 11 certificate, send a large 
SASE to the St. Charles ARC, PO Box 1429 t 
St. Chartes MO 63302-1429. 

WJNFIELD, IL The DuPage ARC will oper- 
ate club station W9DUP, to commemorate 
Armed Forces Day. Operation will be from the 
Cantigny War Museum. This event is from 
1600 UTC^2300 UTC. Suggested frequen- 
cies are 7.250, 14.290, 28.400 SSB and 
145.25 (-.600). For a certificate, send QSL 
and SASE to Jack CarrNV9$, DARCPQ Box 
71, Clarendon Mitts /L, 60S 14. 



May 16-lfl 



HOUSTON, TX The Brazos Valley ARC will 
operate W05DRB from OOOOZ May 1 6-0000Z 

May 18 to celebrate B-VARC's 15th Anniver- 
sary. Operation will be in lower 25 kHz of the 
General 80, 40, 20 , and 15 meter subbands, 
and 28.486 MHz of the Novice subband, with 
special endorsement for past or present B- 



VARC members with callsigns. For a certifi- 
cate, send QSL and SASE to B-VARC, PO 
Box 1630, Missouri City, TX 77459-1630. 

SOUTHFIELD, Ml The 1 992 QSO Party will 
be sponsored by the Oak Park ARC, Phone 
and CW are combined into one contest. Fre- 
quencies CWr 1810, 3540, 3725, 7035, 7125, 
14035, 21035, 21125, 28035, 28125. Phone: 
1855, 3505, 7260, 14280, 21300, 28530- 
VHF: 50.125, 145.025, 146.52. Scoring: Ml 
Stations: 1 point per QSO X (States + Coun- 
tries \ Michigan counties) on phone. VE 
counts as a country. Five points for each 
W8MB contact, Non-Michigan Staiions: QSO 
points X Michigan Counties. One point for 
each M ich ig an phone QSO and two poi nts for 
each CW contact. Five points for each club 
station contact with WBMB/WBMB/mobile. 
No rptr. contacts are allowed. Awards, Certifi- 
cates. Send logs to Mark Shaw K8ED, 27600 
Franklin Road, Apt. 816, Southfield Ml 
48034. 



May 17 



CRESSKiLL, NJ The Bergen ARA, in con- 
junction with Camp Merritt American Legion 
Post 21, will operate K2UFM from 1300Z- 
2100Z to celebrate the 75th anniversary of 
Camp Merritt and the Recedication of the 
Camp Merritt Memorial Monument. Opera- 
tion in General phone portion of 40-80-20-15 
meter bands and the Novice portion of the 10 
meter band. For certificate, send QSL and 
SASE 9 x 12 envelope to Warren P. Hagar 
K2UFM, 31 Forest Drive, HUtsdate NJ 
07842-1351. 



Mav 22-June 14 



WIESBADEN, GERMANY The Wiesbaden 
Germany ARC will operate station HB/ 
0DA1 WA during its 1 7th annual expedition to 
Liechtenstein. Operation will be 24 hr/day on 
all bands 160m through I0m, SSB and CW. 
QSL card will be printed and should be 
through DJQLC for stations outside the U.S. 
and Canada, or through KN6G for stations 
within the U.S. and Canada. Please send 
SASE. Contact Ronald H. Keiferman 
DA1ROfKD4DNA f 435 TAW/WXF, PSC 5, 
Box 38 APOAE 09057. 



May 23-24 



SUMTER, SC The Sumter ARA will hold its 



Iris Festival May 23 & 24 2000 UTC-2000 
UTC. Station call: WA4UMU. Lower 1 kHz of 
General bands: 10m, 15m, 20m, & 40m. Low- 
er 10 kHz of Novice/Tech. Band: 10m. Com- 
munication Mode: Voice only (ail Bands^QSl 
Certificates available with SASE. Contact 
Sum far ARA, PO Box 193, Sumter, SC 
29150-8862 

WATSON, IL The National Trail ARC will 
operate at the annual Memorial Day Home- 
coming. Effingham County, 28.4 -e-and lower 
General phone bands. For QSL, SASE. To 
Callbook: K9UXZ 



May 28-31 



GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA The 
Greenwood ARC is operating the Special 
Event Station VE1RCAF Jan. VDee, 31, 
1992 to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of 
Canadian Forces Base. For commemorative 
QSL (and possible certificate) send QSL and 
SASE (CON) or SA envelope and IRCs to 
Greenwood ARC, PO Box 63, Greenwood 
Nova Scotia, Canada, BOPtNO. QSLs sent 
via Bureau will receive QSL card only via 
Bureau. 



June 1-7 



PADUCAH f KY The Paducah ARA will op- 
erate W4MJA/KY200 to commemorate the 
Commonwealth of Keniucky Bicentenlal Cel- 
ebration. CW and Phone, 25 khz from bottom 
of General/Novice bands, for special QSL, 
send SASE to KC4ENA, PO Box 1732, Pad- 
ucah KY 42002-1732. 



June S 



GUELPH, ONT. CANADA CENTRAL ON- 
TARIO AR FLEA MARKET will be held at 
Bingeman Park, Kitchener Ontario Canada. 
Contact Ray Jennings VE3CZE, 61 Ottawa 
Cres. Gueiph, Ont. Canada, N1E-2A8J519) 
822-8342. 



June6-7 



SIOUX CITY, IA The Siouxland ARA witl 
operate KUSAAR from 15O0Z-210OZ, to cele- 
brate the 120th anniversary of the 1500 mile 
steamboat race between The Nelle Peck and 
The Far West Phone 7.243, 14.265,21.355, 
28.355. For Certificate send SASE to KtARR, 
3407 Jennings St, Sioux City iA 51 104. 



TALK WITH THE KNOWLEDGEABLE PEOPLE AT 




UEMENT 

ELECTRONICS 



FEATURING AN EXTENSIVE LINE OF YAESU PRODUCTS 



ALL MODE HF 
BASE STATION 




$3699 



oo 



#FT1000D 



YAESU u.s. a. 



FT33R/TTP 

FT411E 

FT811 

FT470 

FT911 

FT5200 

FT757GXII 



220MH2 HT 
2MHT 

440 MHZ HT 

2M/44Q HT 

122 MHZ HT 

2M/44 MOBILE 

ALL MODE HF PORTABLE 



$328,00 
$299.00 
$339.00 
$404.00 
$429.00 
$629,00 
$929.00 



IF YOU'RE IN THE BAY AREA, STOP BYI 




1000 S. BASCOM AVENUE 
SAN JOSE, CA 95128 

Call us at (408) 998-5900 

Since 1933 



CIRCLE 132 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 71 



^?^>>^FIVE EXCE 



\^L 



aO 



**€ 



i*% 



HO TUNERS 
^AIllllVAot^ NORADIALS 

W^tt* ^H^%>^^ |st0 RESISTORS 

»^P^^-^2^^ NO COMPROMISE 

FIVE EXCELLENT REVIEWS JUST 

DON'T HAPPEN BY CHANCE 
CALL US FOR A FREE CATALOG. 

■S« review In Gel. T3 S 1 984 *S»p1, ^ f 1 9B5 March 73. 1 90S 
CQ, Dec . 1 9flB M ar. W. R. 91 

BILAL COMPANY 

1 37 Manchester Drive 

Florissant, Colorado B08 1 6 

4719)637-0850 





Enjoy NEVER 



CIRCLE 42 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



W 




here's the Beam? 

Unobtrusive DX Gain Antennas for 60 thru 10 
* Easily hidden + Install Fast * Fi>ced or Portable * 

There's i 20 meter aflEertrta ft'ilh real DX Punch 
luditn in this pi etui*- You can't »ec it, and youi 
TJtighboi^ can't cither. Bui it ivorki DX bawtwt 
anyway. How about a low ptofik 80'40-^0tri- 
bandtr? Or a 2 *l*m*tvT maH^bandtr frr the attic? 
All easily fit the pockctbwk-PrivcJ 119 to 599. 

Work OX without tilling th« neighbors 

iar»paet si An ten na s Wes f 

Era 50061-R, Pfovo, if T &&s ( 801) 373-3425. 



CIRCLE 236 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



DISGUISE" AC WALL OUTLET 



FM TRANSMITTER KIT 

Locks and functions like a common 
outlet; uses power line for power and 
antenna (no batteries needed ever)! 

SURVEILLANCE CATALOG ,.,...$5.00 



*9S.OO 




CAU WfHTtFiEft displays callers phone number si ores 
phone number with date & time nf call... 559. Q^md. 



* .©. >■ 



tkO. Box 33T, Buffalo, NY 14226 (716| 091-3476 




CLIMBING 

YOUR TOWER 

AGAIN 



Are you too scared or too old to climb? Never climb 
again witti this tower and elevator tram system, 
voyager towers are 13 and 16 Inch triangular struc- 
ture? stacfcable to any Height tn 7 1/2', 8 3/4' or 10* 
section iengtns. Easy to install hinge base, walk up 
erection. Next pJumb tower witti leveling bolts in base. 
Mount rotor and large heavy beams on Hazer tram 
and with one hand winch to top of tower for normal 
operating position. Safety lock system operates while 
raising or lowering. At East a cheap, convenient and 
safe way to install and maintain your beam. This Is a 
deluxe tower system that you can enjoy today. 

SPECIAL TOWER PACKAGE: 50 ft. high by 18" face 

tower kit, concrete footing section hinged base, 
HAZER kit r Phillystran guy wires., turnbuddes, earth 
screw anchors, iff mast, thrust bearing, toot kit, 
ground rod and clamp, rated at 15 sq. ft. antenna load 

@ 100 MPH. $ 1974.95. 
MAZER KITS 

HAZER 2 for Rohn 25-hvy duty alum 12 sq ft 
wind ioad 324-95 

hazer 3 for Rohn 25-std alum a sq f t 
wind load 232.95 

HAZER 4 for Rohn 25-hvy galv stl 16 sq ft 
wind load 303,95 

TB-25 Bali thrust bearing 2Y?" max mast dia 74.95 



Satisfaction guaranteed, tall today and order 
by visa, m/c or mall check. Immediate delivery 

Glen Martin engineering, mc 
Dept. A 

RR 3, BOX 322, 
Boonvllle, MO 65233 

816-882-2734 

FAX: S16-B82-7200 






Advertisers 



WW 

RCLE72 EADER5ERVK 



PAY TV AND SATELLITE DESCRAMBLING 

ALL NEW 1991 EDITION 



1992 edition update on cable, wireless and satellite. 
Tum-ons h circuits, bullets, bags, b-mae, blackciphers. 
Includes new VC plus fixes . Our best yet Only $15.95. 
Other (all different) editions: Volume one (basics), 1969 
edition, 1991 edition, $15.95 each. MDS handbook 
$9.95. Saieliite systems under $600. $12.95. any 
3/$29,95 or 5/349,95. Scrambling news year one {154 
pages) 539.95. Video $29;95. Scrambling news monthly 
$24.95/yr. Sample $3. New catalog $1. Special this 
month everything listed for $99.95 . 



Scrambling News, 1552P Hertel Ave,, Buffalo, 
N.Y 14216 C0D ! s 716-B74-20BB VoicerFAX 



CIRCLE 36 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Say You Saw It in 73 V 



QUICK, EASY, & COMPACT 

Flash cards "NOVICE thru EXTRA T theory Key words 
underlined . Over 2000 sets in use! For beginner, OMs, 
XYLs&kkfe. 



NOVJCE 


$11. 95 


TECHNICIAN 


SI 0.95 


GENERAL 


$ 9-95 


ADVANCED 


$1595 


EXTRA 


$14.45 


Shipping 1 


S 3,00 


2 or nwe - 


-S 4.00 


CLUB DISCO LINTS 



Order Today t 

from 



MldBl 



M—m-m 



VIS STUDY CARDS 
P.O. BOX 16646 
HATTIESBURG, MS 39404 



CIRCLE 104 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Used Commercial Gear 



45 Watt GE Mastr II UHF 

30 Watt GE Century II VHF 

40 Watt GE Duplex Exec II UHF 

40 Watt Exec II UHF 

30 Watt EF Johnson VHF 

406-420 H.Q. Sinclair Yagi 

UHF 5+6 gain mobile antenna— 



$149 

$99 

$225 

$185 

$49 

$39 

new $15 



Versatel Communications, 

I 1-800-456-5548 I 

P.O. Box 4012 • Casper, Wyoming B2604 



CIRCLE 259 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



R.S.tf page 

164 Ace Communications of 

Indianapolis 44,45 

* Advanced Electronic Application ... 9" 
67 Alinco Electronics 35* 

194 All Electronics Corporation ... £1 

* Amateur Electronics Supply 31 ' 

5 Antennas West 21 

£96 Antennas West 59 

1 35 Antennas West 61 

1 07 Antennas West 67 

236 Aniennas West ......... 72 

89 Antennas West 75 

16 Astron Corporation ,,.,,,.,,..,,. 27 

21 B&Q.Inc, ..61 

41 Barry Electronics Corporation ...19 
74 Besttvay Systems 67 

42 Bital Company . . . . . 72 

176 Bird Electronics , 17 

1 97 Brainstorm 51 

168 Buckmaster Publishing 17* 

7 Buckmaster Publishing 61* 

170 Buckm aster Publishing 67* 

56 Buckmaster Publishing 75* 

■ Burghafdl Amateur Radio 29 

222 Byers Chassis Kits .............. 47 

184 C & S Sates, Inc 59 

1BO C ft S Sales, Inc, . . 66 

* CB City International , 75 

265 Chipswitch . . . , . 75 

156 Commpute Corporation 24 

99 Communication Concepts, Inc. ... 47 

10 Communication Specialists 43* 

121 Communications Electronic 63 

12 Connect Systems 1 

146 Creative Control Products . . 67 



R.SJ page 

260 CW Enthusiasts . . . .. . 41 

29 D&L Antenna Supply 75 

• Davis HF Co 21 

257 Delta Research 85 

• Diamond Antenna , , . 2 

143 Digital interactive .75 

• Down East Microwave 75 

114 E.H.Yost 56 

• Eavesdropping Detection ........ 72 

8 Elktrontcs 29 

• Emcom Industries 67 

228 Forbes Group . . 28 

• Get-Tech ...,,, 75 

193 GGTE 75* 

72 Glen Martin Engineering . ... r .... 72 

1 92 Grapevine Group ............... 85 

57 Hamtronics, Inc. ...... *..»., ....... 39 

179 loom ... CV2" 

293 tnnotek, Inc 75 

77 Intersex Systems 21 

42 Isotron 72 

55 J-Com . . 79 

176 J-Com 29 

• Japan Radio 37 

2S5 J PS Communications 55 

2 Kawa Productions 59 

» K-Comm . , 67 

• Kenwood USA Corporatfon 5.CV4 

234 Lentini Communications 69 

47 Link-Corn , . 61 

25 Madison Electronic Supply ... 47 

101 Maxcom, Inc 59* 

• Meadowlake Corporation T . 61 

44 Metro Printing 17 

86 WIFJ Enterprises 11 



FLS.# 



page R.SJ 



page 



162 Michigan Radio 15 

160 Micro Computer Concepts 47 

144 Micro Control Specialities 57 

30 Micro Video Products 68 

1 14 Mr. Nicad 58 

248 Motron 41 

54 NCG 61 

82 Oak Hills Research 61 

227 Ocean State Electronics 69 

■ Oklahoma Comm Center 88 

102 ONV Safety Belt 47 

28 Optoelectronics 13 

1 72 Optoelectronics ,. A 49 

262 Outbacker 41 

• P.C. Electronics 53.57* 

264 Palomar Telecom .53 

139 Palomar Telecom , 59 

27B Pautdon ....................... 59 

68 Periphex 73 

* Personal Database . . 51 

249 Philtips-Tech 41 

132 Quement Electronics 51,71 

147 R.L. Drake Company . 61 

110 Radio Amateur Satellite 24 

5B Radio Engineers 79 

* Radio Fun ,.,,, 81 

279 RAI Enterprises 59 

34 Ramsey Electronics ,.. 23* 

1 42 Ready-Pak Systems 21 

• RF Parts Co. , . 65* 

134 Rose , — 67 

254 Ross Distributing 41 

71 Rutland Arrays 79 

153 Satellite City 47* 

36 Scrambling News 72 



95 Sensible Solutions , ..... 24 

167 Seseom, inc 47 

188 SGC 36 

250 Software Systems 52 

244 Software Systems 85 

168 Solder World 58 

51 Spectrum Communications * , 73 

183 Spectrum International 52 

1 74 Spy Supply 51 



247 Startek 



lA&SBMd ■*£ M ,+. ,*■*■■ 



33 



232 TE Systems 24 

1 49 Technitron America 79 

1 24 Texas Bug Catcher Antenna 83 

• The Ham Center 67 

131 The Ham Stalion 53 

150 The Radio Works .......... 79 

1 15 The RF Connection 21 

62 TNR , 85 

299 Townsend Electronics .85 

^ |Z_ I ^_A m IJ ■ ■ LI b A ■ ■ ■ d ■ ■ J i b m d h J ■ ■■ UU 

• Uncle Waynes Bookshelf 86,87 

• Universal Radio ....79' 

• Van Gorden Engineering 29 

1 04 VIS Study Guides, Inc 72 

• Vanguard Labs ................ 58 

78 Vector Control Systems 79 

259 Versatel Communications 72 

1 4 VHF Communications 77 

191 W & W Associates 41 

20 Wolfe Communications 77 

• Yaesu Electronics Corporation . CV3 

Bold listings are 73 s new advertisers this month. 

* Advertisers who have contributed to the National- 
Advisory Committ ee(NIAC). 



72 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



For High Performance in Repeater 
Technology, Go with the Leader 

SPECTRUM 




S-7R Basic Repeater 



"Stand Alone' 1 
or use with 
your controller 



"Setitow 



°"**«e*T*ffi W 






P** 1 ****- s, 



*ri* t 



10-40 Watt Units 

2M, 222, 440 MHz 

Super Sensitive/Selective Receivers 

Unusually Good Repeat Audio 

Proven Performance throughout 

the World! 





SCR1400 

REPEATER W/ 150 WT. 2M Amp 

&30A POWER SUPPLY. 

(All items available separately) 

Shown in optional cabinet 

Call or write today for details and prices! 
Get your order in A.S.A.P. 
Sold Factory Direct or through Export Sales 
Reps. only. 



IIP 




<*& 



$> 



Bll* 



X 



*P 



t *\.oX* 



dp**^ 






For that new Machine— Spectrum 
makes 2 lines of Repeaters— the 
Deluxe SCR 1400 and the new basic 
low cost S-7R line. 

The S-7R Repeaters maintain the 
quality of design, components and 
construction which have made Spec- 
trum gear famous throughout the 
world for years. 

However, all of the "bells & whistles" 
have been eliminated — at a large cost 
savings to you! The S-7R is a real 
"work-horse" basic machine designed 
for those who want excel lent, super-re- 
liable performance— but no frills! For 
use as a complete "stand-alone" unit, 
or with a controller. 

Of course, if you do want a Full Fea- 
tured/Super Deluxe Repeater with 
Full panel metering and controls, and 
a complete list of 'built-in' options, 
then you want our SCR 1400— the 
new successor to the "Industry Stan- 
dard" SCR 1000/4000. 

Available with Autopatch/Reverse 
Patch/Landline Control; TouchTone 
Control of various repeater functions; 
'PL' f m "Emergency PwrJID; High/Low 
TX Power; Tone & Timer Units; Sharp 
RX Filters; Power Amps f etc. 



■ Complete Line of VHF/UHF Rcvr. 
& Xmtr. Link Boards & Assemblies 
also available. Plus ID, COR, DTMF 
Control Bds- r Antennas, Duplexers r 
Cabinets, etc. Inquire. 

■ New— 6m Receivers 




SPECTRUM COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

1055 W. Germantown Pk, S4 * Norristown, PA 19403 • (215) 631-1710 • FAX: (215) 631-5017 

CIRCLE 51 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



REMEMBER. .A LOW COST POWER PACK 
WITHOUT PERIPHEX'S QUALITY IS NO BARGAIN 



PEmPHBXPOWlsRPACKS^ 




i\SUPER packs for 

^£* ICOM 2/4SAT & 24AT 








EXTENDED 
CAPACITY 



BP-83 7.2V fiOOmah 

$33.50 
BP-83S 7.2V 750mah 

$43.50 
BP-84 7.2V 'iDDOmah 

$57,00 
BP-84S7.2V1400mah 

$63.00 
BP85S12V800mah 

$76.00 



SAVE ON THESE POPULAR 

PERIPHEX POWER PACKS 

BP-7S 132V 1200mah . . . $65.00 

BP-8S9.6V1200mah .., $65,00 




'■[■!-' '-I- !■' .jj >'. :< . : " Mi W!-. !-ii 



SAVE WITH THES 
YAESU VALUES 




FNB-4SH 12V lOOOmah 

$71.00 

FNB-14S 7.2V 1400m ah 

$59.75 

FNB-17 7.2V 60Qmah 

$35,00 
FNB-1212V500mah 
$45 95 
"SEND FOR FREE FNB 2 10.8V 500mah 

CATALOG" S 2250 



BIG SAVINGS 




PB-25/26S 8.4V 900mah 

$65.00 

PB-1 12V 1200iftah 

$67,00 

PB-8S 12V BOOmah 

$59,00 



■• •» .>, •>•:•: s.j .■&,, ,.. : 



Manufactured in the U.S.A. with matched cells, these 

Sup&r Packs future short circuit protection artrj 

overcharge protection, and a T2 month warranty. 

All inserts in stock or available from authorized dealers 

CALL US TQ DISCUSS YDUfi BATTERY REQUIREMENTS. 




^ 



: 



MuslurCiin] 



Atld S4.DD Shipping & HandJmg. 
Connecticut residents add fl% tax. 

iiiiiHPeftlPHGK Inc. 

115-1B Hurley Rd„ Oxford, CT 06478 

800*634*8132 

In Connectic ut 203*264*3985 - FAX 203*262*6943 



-I in iii| i - m_ L (i i &—**—*- 






CLRCLE 68 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 24 on your Feedback card 



Above and beyond 

VHF and Above Operation 



\b{oard^ {.puf file lor PUFF, Version 2.0} 
d (display: vQh or PUFF chooses, 
3 One-color} 



1 EGA, 2 CGA, 



C L. Houghton WB6IGP 
San Diego Microwave Group 
6345 Badger Lake 
San Diego CA 92719 

PUFF, a Microwave 
Design Program 

Last month I described components 
for use with microwave circuitry. I want- 
ed to describe the special chip capaci- 
tors and resistors needed for tow-loss 
conversion at microwave levels to help 
you select components that won't hin- 
der you at microwave frequencies. I 
covered examples of non -microwave 
capacitors and described how to rec- 
ognize them. This month I want to do a 
short recap of this information and then 
go on to a new topic: PUFF, the mi- 
crowave design program from Cal 
Tech. 

The capacitors needed to achieve 
high performance at the 5.6 GHz 
and 10 GHz microwave frequencies 
are those that are supplied from 
ATC (American Technical Ceramics), 
style ATC-100; Johanson, type S-910; 
and Dielectric Laboratories C11 se- 
ries capacitors. These chip capaci- 
tors are sized for microwave strip 
line construction and have very low 
equivalent series resistance (ESR), 
making them suitable for microwave 
operation. There are other companies 
that manufacture chip capacitors that 
are quite good. I will provide informa- 
tion on them as soon as I receive the 
datasheets. 

PUFF 

So much for the capacitors. Let's get 
started with PUFF, This program is 
made for microwave circuit analysis 
and I hope you had time to order your 
copy and try it out. I am quite excited 
about PUFF because it allows you to 
construct microwave circuits. It is not 
just limited to amplifier construction; 
filters, patch antennas and many other 
two- or four-port devices can be con- 
structed in strip line format. In the past I 
had to rely on published microwave cir- 
cuitry from other designers, and I had 
to use the devices they selected. With 
PUFF, all that changed. Now I can de- 
sign for devices I have on hand, modi- 
fying the circuit to my requirements, I 
can't overstate my excitement over 
PUFF's ability to re-design circuitry to 
suit whatever GaAsFET you might 
have on hand. All you need is the "S' f 
parameters to pull the design off, This 
makes PUFF a very powerful engineer- 
ing tool to have on hand. Let's cover 
some of the beginning steps required 
to design an amplifier from scratch. In 
actual use, the projected performance 
of my projects matched well with actual 



measurements, giving PUFF a five- 
star rating in my book. 

If you want an amplifier to put In 
PUFF, use the test example shown in 
Figures. It gave 14 dB gain at 10 GHz. 
This amplifier needs some more work 
to improve the input return loss (s11), 
See what you can do with it as it has all 
the parts in E 'F4" to get you started. 

Kerry N6IZW did the original work 
using PUFF, and I did the reproduction 
11 si Ik-screening" of the printed circuit 
boards directly from PUFF's artwork 
printer dump. (We used a laser printer 
for high quality.) The circuit we de- 
signed was for a 10 GHz amplifier us- 
ing an NEC-04583 GaAsFET, We se- 
lected this device for purely amateur 
reasons; They were available in sur- 
plus for modest prices and we had a 
few already on hand. Normally this 
device is quite costly, being space-cer- 
tified, but being a discontinued device 
made surplus a good choice. A modest 
surplus quantity still exists and I will 
make them available while the supply 
holds out for under $10 per device. I 
also have some of the finished PC 
boards if you do not want to construct 
your own. Please note: You do not 
need to use the NE04583 device. You 
can use whatever device you have on 
hand as long as you have the S param- 
eters for that particular device. You 
can design your own circuit using the 
samples I provide for a guide. 

Starting PUFF requires an iBM or 
compatible computer with 640 kilo- 
bytes of memory and DOS-3,0 or later. 
Monitors supported are CGA, EGA, 
and VGA. Both Kerry and I had difficul- 
ty using the EGA drivers in PUFF, but 
the other modes worked great on the 
many different types of systems that 
we tried. 

We had difficulty using 386 33 MHz 
computers. The program is loaded by 
typing PUFF at the DOS prompt. This 
will load the EXE file and bring up the 
set up, puf file to demonstrate some of 
the capabilities of the design program. 

In actual use T save the master set- 
up, puf file and do not alter it. On a 
saved copy of this file you will need to 
use your word processor to make the 
necessary changes required for your 
particular circuit configuration. This in- 
cludes the type of device you are using 
and all parameters needed for this par- 
ticular design, board size, dielectric 
used, etc. Note: The original setup. puf 
file uses a PC board dielectric of <s 10" 
for ceramic substrate. Most designs 
we use require this to be changed to 
"2.5" to reflect TEFLON. J suggest you 
look at Figure 1, 'Original Setup. puf 
and Figure 2, a modified file for a 10 
GHz amplifier using 2.5 dielectric PC 



LaserJet, 
t 
Manhattan} 



zd 

fd 

er 

h 

s 

c 

r 



50.000 

5.000 

10.20 



1 
25 





270 
400 
000 
200 



{artwork: output format, dot-matrix, 1 
HPGL file} 
{type: for mictostrip, 1 for stripline, 

Ohms { normal izing impedance. Q<zd\ 

GHz (design frequency, 0<fd} 

(dielectric constant. er>0} 

mm (dielectric thickness. h>Gj 

mm {circuit-board side length. s>0} 

rum (connector separation, c^Q] 

mm (circuit resolution t r>Q, use Um for 



2 for 



(artwork width correction.] 

(metaJ thickness r use Um for micrometers - .} 

{metal surface roughness, use Um for 

{dielectric loss tangent.) 
[conductivity of metal in mhos/meter * } 
[photographic reduction ratio. 

(mitering Fraction^ o<=m<i} 



micrometers } 

a D . mm 

mt . 10 mm 

sr 0.000 Um 

micrometers . } 

It O.OE+0000 

cd 5.3E+0007 

p 5.00 

p<=2 3 .2mm/E] 

m 0.600 

\k{ey for plot window} 

du {upper dB-axis Limit} 

dl -20 (lower dD-axis limit} 

fl (lower frequency limit. fl>=*0] 

fu 10 {upper frequency limit- £u>fl} 

pes 21 (number of points r positive integer} 

sr 1 (Smith-chart radius. sr>0j 

S 11 (subscripts must be 1, 2, 3, or 4) 

\p{a.rts window} (O = Ohms, D = degrees, U = micro, 

| -parallel ] 

lumped 150O 

tline 50O 90D 

qiine 50O 1300 

:xf ormer 1.73:1 

at.ten 4dR 

device fhx04 

clines 60O 400 90D 

{Blank at Part h } 

[Blank at Part i } 

[ Blank at Part j } 

[Blank at Part k J 

(Blank at Part 1 } 

(Blank at Part m } 

{Blank at Part n } 



Figure 1. Original setup. pui \ 



board material, Kerry renamed the 
file something we wouid remember 
easily for this particular type of device, 
in this case the new setup, puf file is 
NE045&3U.PUF, Comments in the set- 
up file can be inserted behind the 
braces, as shown in Figure 1 or 2. 

The one critical point to make is the 
file extension "PUF*': Do not change 
this extension, for that is how the pro- 
gram finds your particular application 
set-up file. Another part of this set-up 
file contains "DEVICE FILE." This is 
the file that you load all the S parame- 
ters into for the particular device you 
plan to work with. This file must reflect 
accurately the S parameters for each 
device you plan to work with. They 
must cover the frequency range you 
call up in your set up. puf file or the pro- 
gram will halt. You wil! need one device 
file for each different device you have 
and a set-up file particular to each 
device/frequency that you plan to work 
with. All this information is necessary 
and must conform strictly to these 
rules, 

The device file can be used by any 
set-up file calling for the same type 
device if the S parameters are called 
out for the frequency range in question 
in the device file. PUFF will pick out just 
the necessary frequency parameters 
you call out. For the NEC-04583, I 
called out S parameters in my device 
file from 0,1 GHz to 18 GHz, This re- 
quires a lot of typing, but it's worth it 
later. You can develop these files in a 
sort of library for later reference, mak- 
ing design very fast. 



This file must be edited from the 
master .DEV file on the PUFF disk, DO 
NOT put any extra characters in the 
file; preserve it as a pure ASCII file. See 
Figure 3 t my file for the NEC04583 S 
parameters from 0,1 GHz to 18 GHz, 
You can limit the frequency range by 
including only the frequency you need 
for calculations, but as I said, if other 
frequency use is contemplated it's best 
to have it all in the file. Once you get the 
hang of PUFF's format it wif! become 
quite easy to design a project. Most 
construction projects take only about a 
half hour, with most of the time used to 
modify the set-up file to suit your new 
requirements. 

Let's get into some of the different 
parts of the PUFF screen. When you 
pull up the program you get four basic 
parts of the screen you can access. 
They are the Layout (F1), Plot (F2), 
Parts (F3), and the Board (F4). Each of 
these screen areas can be reached by 
typing the respective ,4 F + ' control key 
on your keyboard. Typing "F1 0" at any 
time will bring up a smalt help function 
screen defining those commands par- 
ticular to the portion of the screen you 
are currently residing in, such as "F4." 
To get the other help screens you must 
go to that screen, such as J 'F2 P " and 
re-type "F10 1 " to get its help screen. 
Don't worry about all the commands in 
PUFF; just use "F10 1 ' for hefp r or post 
a lookup table from Figure 4. 

Using the Program 

Getting started in PUFF once your 
setup and device files are taken care of 



74 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 




X-BAND TRANSMITTER 

Miniature {FA x 3?4 x 
V) GaAs microstrip 
transmitter pro- 
vides 10 dBm centered at 10.525 GHz. 
Integrated microstrip patch antenna elimi- 
nates the need for an external antenna. 
Advanced matching techniques secured 
good temperature stability with lowfrequency 
pulling. Great for long-range testing of radar 
detectors, calibration of radar receiving 
equipment, and point-to-point communica- 
tion links. 

Complete Assembled System. $39.00 

Parts & Instruction Kit — $29.00 



Pius $2.00 Shipping and Handling 



INNOTEK tnc, 



P.O. Sox 80096, Fort Wayne, IN 46898 
(219)489-1711 

Visa * MasterCard * Check ■ Money Order - COD 
Money-Back Guarantee 



CIRCLE 293 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Say you saw it in 73! 




ienna 

n 



Pico-J rolls up and hides fn 
his 4-ounce pocket-sized 
holder, waiting like the Ge- 
nie in a bottle tifl you need 
full-quieting signal punch. 

Call him forth and his glistening biack weather 
sealed IHnes reveal a sleek end-fed halfwave an- 
tenna ready to hang anywhere. Suspend in the 
apartment closet or patio doorway. 
Attach Pico* J to window glass or 
curtain rod. He needs no radials for broad- 
band low-angie omni hait^ave gain. 

Carry Pico- J with you for emergencies. Hang 
tn the motei when on the road. He improves 
range, boosts reception, saves batteries. 

Pico-J comes ready for work with 72° isolated 
coaxial feedline and gold pin BNC. Typical 
edge-to-edge SWR under 12:1. Hand- crafte d 
in the USA 

Mod*ie AntennasWest 
Be* 5006^d 2 men** Order Hotline 

64605 «omhz 800-926-7373 



InfoSi 



95 



cpc 



CIRCLE 89 ON REAPER SERVICE CARD 



NEW ! DSP For 
Amateur Radio 

Introducing a powerful IBM -PC based digital signal 

processor with the performance and ?lexiabi-iiy of 

systems costing thousands of dollars more. 



[s; rsj 



289 INTRODUCTORY OFFER ! 



* EQUALIZE, NOTCH USING EXTREMELY SHARP DIGITAL FILTEFWG 

• PROFESSIONAL AUOIO 16 BIT AJD AND t8 BIT CM CONVERTERS 

• USE SPECTRUM DISPLAY TO DEFINE ADAPTIVE FILTER 

■ A MOUSE DRAWN SKETCH INSTANTLY BECOMES A FILTER 

■ FAST ON SCREEN SPECTRAL DISPLAY Of RECEIVERS OUTPUT 

* SUPPORTED BV POWERFUL SK55CFT* SOFTWARE 

■ MUCH MORE I 

■ 30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE I 

digital iNTEjRAcrrrra: 

SIGNAL CORPORATION 

l J LEASE CM. I HR WRITE FOR MORE INPO : 
2317 N.E iWlh Ave. Vancouver, Wu 9&M Ph. 2D6 256-666* 



.11 I 



GIVE YOUR 

HR-2510 HR-2 

tfie same features as the 

"BIG RIGS" 



30 Memot} 3 nne Is 

Automatic Repeater Offset 

Pt .j^ar^.Yu-Me Transmit Timeout 

Progi :-r'i.m* able Seek/Sean (5 Khz.etc} 

Program _mah^> Mike /Channel Buttons 

Programmable Transmit Preq. Limits 

Extended Frequency Range aa t* 12 meters) 

Priority Channel 

Split Frequency 

Many More Features 




e 



All these features by replacing 
your radio's exisHng 'dPtT chip! 

(Priority Channel requir, ptional hardware) 
$59*95 (Optional Chip Socket $7. SO) 



Includes Operator's and Installation Manuals 

CHIPSWITCm 

4773 Sonoma Hwy, Suite 132 
Santa Rosa, CA 95409-4269 

Write or call (707) 339-0512 for free information 

Uu^ntityprice^ajail^ble^caje^n^ 



CIRCLE 265 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



DUAL BAND 

146/446 MHZ 

No Tuning Required 

18 inches Tali All Black 

Noiseless Spring 

Preserves the sleek look of your vehicle 

Performance Equals or exceeds a 578 

wave on VHF or Collinear on UHF 

$29.95 + shipping 

Accessories Available 

30 Day money back guarantee 

We Bke Ihis antenna and Ihe way it operates so wel, 
that we are willing to offer a warranty that is almost 

unheard of in tfie amateur radio market today. 

tf in the first 30 days you are not satisfied wilh ihe 

way this antenna operates, return the antenna in 

good condition, postage paid and we will refund to 

you the $29.95 purchase price. 

D & L ANTENNA SUPPLY 

P.O. Box 6784, Leawood, Kansas 66206 

06:00 PM to 08:00PM 

Information: 1-913-677-4766 

Order Line: 1-800-533-5160 





CIRCLE 29 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MICROWAVE TRANSVERTERS 



— ■.■.".■■■ .jjyi .... I .y i 

l^t:*a '?>■■ ■:■■■■ ■■■ -•■:■ 4::T^. 




SHF 1 240 Complete Transverter 
SWF SYSTEMS No tune linear transveriere and Iransverior kits tor 
902, 1269. 1296, 2304, 2400, 3456 MHz. Mute 2m i.f.gl 3.8V. Kits 
include mixer end t_0 P.C- boards, xtar and all components. BuiM 
units include I.F./D.C. switchboard, connectors and compact low 
profile housing. Other frequency options in amateur band available, 

SHF 900K 902-906 MHz SOfnW Kit $139 BUltWS 

SHF1240K 129*4300 MH* 10mW 

SHF1269K 12604272 OEaraseiL tQltlW 

SHF2304K 2304-230A Mffe lOmW 

5HF2401K 2400 MHz StadeS ictCgtw 

SHF3456K 3456-3460 KH2 Mm* 

SHFLOK 540-5*0 MHiLCh SOmW 

CALL OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE CATALOG 

DOWN EAST MICROWAVE 

Bill Olson, W3HQT 
Box 2310, RR1 Troy, ME 04987 



Kit $149 Built $265 

Krt$l40 Buift$255 

Krt$206 BuMI$32S 

Kit$155 Bu«$2SS 

Kft$205 Built $325 
KitS 66 




(207)046-3741 FAX: (207) 948-51 57 



KE2AM a s 
VOICE ID'er/ 



COMPLETELY SL"l_r CONTAINED-jusl add radios, power, 
rnic, and yon tiave a tepealer. Record any voice into 
batlery tMchip Non-Volarile RAM. On- board Timers take 
t:;jr« ol IO. squelch lail. and time-oul Timing. Mixer for 
receiver and lD*er audio Muting ol receive audio during 
squelch toil COR or squelch activated. Alf buffered I/O 



VER B F£AYUft£S 



J VOICE IDto 

/ AUDIO MIXER 2v p-p 

/ mm TX DRIVE 

J +8 TO 15* OPERATION 

J TIME-OUT, tD t TIMERS 

/ SMALL SIZE 3 T X 3 *" 

/ SQUELCH. COfl KEYED 

J MADE IN USA. 

/ HIGH QUALITY 

/ LOW PRICE 

/ BATTERY BACKUP HAM 

7 SCHEMATICS INCLUDED 



GET-TECH 

201 RJtey Rood 

New Windsor, MY 

12553 




SEE REVIEW OF (VER A| 73 MAG JUNE^I | 
NOT A KIT $99.00 

GHDEfl SY PHONt OH MAIL.. IN U.S. A 

ADO S5 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING 

COD CHARGES ATIE ADDITIONAL. 




HamCaU / CD-ROM 

500.000 HAMS plus 

LOW'S of PutoHc Domain 

Amateur fUdio Programrand Data 

Now with mtemallonal 

CO-ROM Dlec $50,00 

Shippi ng (per order) $5-00 



Publishing 

Rt 3 Boh 56 - Mlrv&al, Virginia 23U7 




CIRCLE S6 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CB-TO-10 METERS 



We specialize in CB radio modification 
plans and hardware. Frequency and FM 
conversion kits, repair books, pfans, high- 
performance accessories. Thousands of 
satisfied customers since 1976! Catalog $2. 



CBC INTERNATIONAL 

LOU FRANKLIN-K6NH - Owner 
P.O. BOX 31500X. PHOENIX. AZ 35046 



SCARED OF THE CODE? 



IT'S A SNAP WITH THE ELEGANTLY SIMPLE 
HORSE TUTOR ADVANCED EDITION FOR 
BEGINNERS TO EXPEHTS- AND BEYOND 

Mora Code teaching software from GGTE is the 
most popular In the world— and for good reason. 
You'll learn quickest with the most modem teaching 
methods^- Including Famaworth or standard coda, 
on-screen ftaahcarda, random characters , words and 
biltiona of con veraationa guaranteed to contain every 
required character every lime— In 12 easy lessens* 

Sneak through bothersome plateaus In one tenth of 
a word par minute step*. Or, create your own drills 
and ptay thorn, print them and saw them to disk. 
Import, analyze and convert test to code for addNton- 

aiovrme. 

Get the software the ARAL sells and usee to create 
thaw practice and teat tapes. Horse Tutor Advanced 
Edition is approved for VE exams at all levels. Horse 
Tutor Is great— Morse Tutor Advanced Edition la even 
better— end hVa In user selectable color. Order yours 
today. 



For aft MS-DOS computers (Including laptops). 

Available at dealers, thru OSTor 73 or sand $29.95 

+ $3 S*H(CA residents add 7,75% tax) to: 

GGTE. P.O. Box 3405, Deprt. MS, 

Newport Beach, CA 92659 

Specify 5W or 3Vfc Inch disk 

(price Includes 1 year of free upgrades} 




73 



CIRCLE 143 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 1 93 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 75 



\b(oard} t,puf file for PUFF, version 2*0 J 
d {display: 9 VGA or PUFF chooses r 
3 One-color | 



1 EGA, 2 CCA, 



O 

LaserJet, ! 

i 

Manhattan? 

id 50.000 Ohms 

fd 10.300 GHz 

er 2.500 

b 0.711 no 

ft 13.000 mm 

C 0.000 hi 

r 0,200 bb 

micrometers ) 
a 0.0 00 mm 
rot 0.010 nm 
■r 0.000 Um 
micrometers, ] 
It O.OE+0000 
Cd 5.BE+0007 
p 1.000 
p* =20 3* 2mm/ s J 
m 0.600 

\kfey for plot 



{artvork output format :0 dot-matrix, 1 
HPGL file) 
(type: for vicrostrip, 1 for stripline, 



2 for 



{normalizing impedance. 0<zd} 
{design frequency. 0<fd} 
[dielectric constant. er>0J 
{dielectric thickness* h>0) 
{circuit -board side lengtb. s>0) 
{connector separation* c>=0} 
{circuit resolution* r>0, use Um 



for 



{artwork width correction.} 

{metal thickness, use um for micrometer*-) 

(metal surface roughness, use Dm for 

{dielectric loss tangent. \ 
(conductivity of metal in mhos/meter*} 
{photographic reduction ratio. 



{mdtering 
window ] 



fraction. 0<=m<ll 



2 
-2 

12 

21 



du 

dl 

i i 

fu 

ptfl 

ar l 

3 21 

S U 

\p{arts window} 

{•parallel} 
umped 1500 
tUne 50O 2BD 
qline 50O 6SD 
tline 500 40D 
qline 50O 66D 
qline 500 90D 
tline 50O 60D 
device ne045 9 3 
tline 1400 90D 
lumped LOGO 2m 
tline 100O SOD 
luaped 00 ljftft 
tline 1000 50D 



{upper dfi-axis limit} 
(lower dB-axis limit} 
{lower frequency limit- fl>=0} 
j upper frequency limit. fu>fl] 
{number of points, positive integer} 
(Smith-chart radian . flr>0) 

\ subscripts must be ], 2 t 3, or 4} 



| a = Ohms, D ■ degrees, tl = micro, 



Figure 2. Modified setup put, renamed NE 4583U.puf. 



m your word processor is easy. When 
calling up the PUFF program, (suggest 
you start by typing "PUFF." This will 
bring up the default Sefup*puf file. 
Then go to the plot window "F2" and 
type a "Ctrt-R." This is the read file 
command and you can then specify the 
set-up file you want to use, like 
"NE4583U." The extension M .PUF" is 
not needed as PUFF keeps track of the 
extension. Once your new file is load- 
ed, verify that you have a few parts in 
the 4, F3" parts area. At minimum, you 
need a "tline" and a device to pet start- 
ed. Type the Information in; you can 
use the examples in Figure 1 or 2 for 
reference, Others can be added in the 
same format whenever you require 
them by accessing thai portion of the 
screen: "Fd/" etc. Now go to the layout 
sown "F1 " and you will see an ' X" In 
the center of the screen if all is ok. If 
not, type a "Ctrt-E T " to erase the circuit, 
then start over. 

Usually we place the device at the 
center of the circuit. To place the 
device, look In the parts window and 
see which line you have the device 
specified on (let's say line d). Type thai 
line letter, d, 1 and a device will ap- 
pear at the center of the screen when 
you Specify the direction you want the 
device to face. To face right* hit the 
right arrow key and the device will ap- 
pear on the screen. Then move to the 
input of the device and hit the left arrow 
key. Now let's lay the first transmission 
line (strip line) going towards port 1 , the 
input of the amplifier. Type the letter of 
your "tline" in the parts window (let's 



assume "'b"), then type the tetter "b" 
and the direction you want this strip 
line to go, and hit the left arrow key 
once, 

This places the input strip line from 
the amplifier going towards the Input 
connector of the board on the left. To 
connect the strip line to the connector, 
hit the number key "1 ." This will make 
an electrical connection to the input 
port between the strip line and the port 
1 . Use the right arrow key three times 
to go to the output of the amplifier. 
Now, to connect the output of the am* 
piif ier to port 2 for analysis (of the input 
network), hit the number "2" key. The 
circuit now goes from the input of the 
amplifier to the output and can be ana- 
lyzed using the plot window- 

Access the PLOT window by hitting 
the "F2" key, We can now set up the 
parameters for the plot analysis All 
parts of the plot window, as well as the 
graph, can be changed to accommo- 
date the type of pk>t you want to make. 

Normally, we first start out making a 
plot of the input match of the network, 
the "tline 11 on line "b M of the parts file. 
The parameter we want here is "S1 1 ," 
input return loss or impedance match- 
ing at your desired frequency. To do 
this, go to the parts window "F3" and 
place a question mark In front of the 
electrical degree specified for the part 
you want to sweep. (Example: "b tline 
60 ohms ?10Q degrees.") Don't worry 
about the ohm symbol or the degrees 
symbol; they don't appear on my word 
processor, but they are taken care of in 



(KEQ45B3 M£S FET Vdtt- 


■3V, ids 


-lQ.tiA] 










f 




Sll 




521 




sl2 




s22 


0.1 


0.999 


^2*0 


2,875 


178-0 


0,002 


88.0 


0,742 


-1.0 


1.0 


0,91*0 


-18.0 


2,794 


162.4 


0.016 


78.0 


0,729 


-13.0 


2.0 


0*970 


-36.0 


2.772 


145.0 


0.033 


64,0 


0-711 


-27.0 


3,0 


0,947 


-54-0 


2.716 


128,0 


0*046 


49.0 


0.706 


-40.0 


4.0 


0.915 


-71.0 


2.565 


111-0 


0.060 


37.0 


0-681 


-53.0 


5,0 


0,882 


-87.0 


2.534 


95.0 


0.069 


26.0 


0.669 


-64.0 


4.0 


0.854 


-104.0 


2.325 


80*0 


0.075 


15*0 


0,663 


-76.0 


7.0 


0.82* 


-120,0 


2.100 


65.0 


O.OflO 


5-0 


0.650 


-89.0 


8.0 


0.790 


-135*0 


1.802 


50.0 


0,084 


-6.0 


0.643 


-101. o 


9.0 


0.775 


-149-0 


1.775 


38.0 


0.086 


-12.0 


0.643 


-111,0 


10,0 


0.75& 


-162,0 


1,450 


26.0 


O.OBB 


-19.0 


0.629 


-122.0 


11*0 


0.774 


-175*0 


1.555 


13.0 


0.091 


-26,0 


0.631 


-132,0 


12. Q 


0.725 


171. 


1-455 


-3.0 


0.094 


-33.0 


0.640 


-142.0 


13,0 


0,705 


159,0 


1,350 


-15.0 


0.097 


-37.0 


0.642 


-152.0 


14,0 


0.68A 


149.0 


1,250 


-26,0 


0.100 


-43.0 


0.645 


-163.0 


15.0 


0.680 


142.0 


1.200 


-38.0 


0.102 


-45*0 


0.654 


-172.0 


16,0 


0,675 


128,0 


1.101 


-50-0 


O.105 


-4B.0 


0.673 


-178.0 


17.0 


0.652 


117.0 


1.051 


-61.0 


0.108 


-50.0 


0.687 


170.0 


18.0 


0.630 


107*0 


1.012 


-73*0 


0*115 


-54.0 


0.696 


160.0 



Figures, NBO04583 device fffe, 0. t GHz/18 GHz. 



PUFF. To get a degrees symbol hit 
76 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



1 ' Alt-D" and to get the ohms symbol hit 
"Alt-O"; the parallel sign is "Alt-P" 
and micro is "Alt-M." To get a big 
Smith chart using VGA monitors only, 
type "Alt-S." PUFF keeps symbols 
simple— if you forget type "F1CT to 
bring up the help screen. 

Now, to plot the proper value of elec- 
trical line length for part "b." go to plot 
window "F2," then arrow down to the 
test parameter and change it to "SI V 
from "S21 .*' Then arrow down further 
to the graph and set top to. say. 40 and 
the bottom to -20 or so. Further arrow 
down and reset the bottom left edge to 
"0" and the right edge to "150/' These 
are the values you are going to sweep 
between: plus 20 and minus 20 d B , and 
part length from zero to 150 electrical 
degrees. These values are not abso- 
lute. You can modify them to anything 
you destre. Verify that you have a smatl 
number of points in the plot window, 
say 20 or SO points, if you have several 
hundred you will just have to wait until 
your computer gets done doing all the 
computations called for. If your com- 
puter Is fast, go for the higher numbers. 
To start the plot sweep, type the letter 
"P" and sit back and watch. 

What you want to record is the cross- 
ing point of the sweep on the "g=1" 
circle. To find out what this point is, 
movethe marker with the 'page up or 
"page down" keys to enter the exact 
spot it crosses the upper part of the 
"*g=1" circle. If it is not precise use 
more points of calculation and plot it 
again. When this value is noted, go 
back to the parts window "F3" and 
remove the lJ ?" on the part and change 
its electrical degrees to that noted in 
the step just completed . Now establish 
another "tline' ' and set the value to any 
reasonable value, say, 50 degrees, 
and place the "?" in front of its part to 
sweep it. When this is done* go to the 
board window "F1" and position the 
marker on the left end of the "b" part, 
Erase the connection to the number 1 
port by holding down the shift key 
and hit the number 1 key. After the 
connection has been erased type the 
new part "tline" letter, say* "c," and 
hit the down arrow. This should place 
a new matching "tline" on the left end 
of the J 'b" part. Reconnect port 1 by 
arrowing up one keystroke up-arrow h 
and type the number "t" to make 



the left circuit connection. 

Now go back to the plot window 
"F2" and re-plot "811" to determine 
the matching stub's proper value. If the 
"tline" strip is proper in length from the 
previous sweep, the new sweep should 
circle the "9=1" circle perfectly. Use 
decimal points to be exact to one or two 
places. You should obtain a good 
graph plot of high return loss "dip" in 
the chart at the frequency you desire to 
operate at. Use the page up and down 
keys to determine just where the cross- 
ing point is. 

Some of the control characters are 
the photographic artwork, "Ctrl- A"; 
erase and start over, "Ctrt-£"- move to 
nearest node (can be very useful], 
"Ctrt-N"; re-ptot. "Ctrt-P"; read file. 
"Ctrl-R"; and save file, "Ctrl-S," need- 
less to say the most important of ail 
commands to remember. 

Well, so much for PUFF for this 
month. I hope you have as much fun as 
I have had. Next month I will cover 
some fine points on PUFF operation. I 
have a few NE04583 devices available, 
as well as a PC board using the 
NE04583 device* with gain of about 12 
dB for one stage. The price of one 
device and PC board is $20 postpaid, 
or $10 each for either item postpaid 
Save money and design your own with 
PUFF. As always, I will be glad to an- 
swer any questions covering this 
month's topic, as welt as related sub- 
jects, 73 from Chuck WB6IGP 



FL LAYOUT HELP 


ARROW KEYS 


DRAW PART 


■ 


GROUND 


1 THRU 4 


CORRECT PATH 


A THRU r 


S ELECT PATH 


CTRL-e 


ERASE CKT 


CTRL-n 


GO TO NODE 


SHIFT HOVE/BRASS 


F2 PLOT HELP 




Aft ROW KEYS 


CURSOR 


p,CTRL~p 


PLOT 


pgup<pgdn 


MARKER 


CTRL-S 


SAVE 


CTRL- a 


ARTWORK 


1,S 


IMPULSE STEP 


TAB 


TOGGLE SMITH 


F3 PARTS HELP 


ARROW KEY 


CURSOR 


DEL f BACKSPACE, 


in;; 


ALT-o 


OHM 3 SYMBOL 


ALT-d 


DEGREE SYMBOL 


ALT-M 


MU SYMBOL 


ALT-p 


PARALLEL SYMBOL 


CTRL-e 


ERASE CKT 


CTRL-r 


READ FILE 


TAB 


EXTRA PARTS 



Figure 4. PUFF Command summary. 



Hams a ts 



Number 25 on your Feedback card 



Andy MacAliister WA5ZI8 
14714 Knightsway Driv0 
Houston TX 77083 



More SAREX Activity 
Coming 

The Shuttle Amateur Radio Experi- 
ment (SAREX) continues with more 
missions scheduled this year. Unlike 
the Russian Mir activity, U.S. shuttle 
operations use separate uplink and 
downlink frequencies. Current plans 
include 145.55 MHz as the primary 
downlink and 144.91, 144.95 and 
144.97 MHz for uplinks. 

Many shuttle crew members who are 
not yet hams are pursuing their licens- 
es. The Johnson Space Center Ama- 
teur Radio Club and licensed astro- 
nauts have requested that SAREX 
equipment be carried on all high-incli- 
nation orbit missions. These flights 
provide more hams with the opportuni- 
ty for earth-to-shuttle contacts. Start- 
ing with STS-5Q, a common caflsign T 
W5RRR/S, will be used for shuttle mis- 
sions to avoid confusion, especially for 
packet activity. 

STS-50 is currently scheduled for 
launch on June 9th from Pad A at the 
Cape using vehicle 102, Columbia . Ex- 
pected to Jast 13 days, this will be the 
longest orbiter flight to date. The incli- 
nation will be 28.5 degrees and the alti- 
tude 160 mites* The primary pay load is 
USML-01 , the U.S, Microgravity Labo- 
ratory. Richard "Dick* 1 Richards is cur- 
rently studying for his license and an- 
ticipates voice contacts on 2 meters, as 
with the STS-45 mission. 

Late August is the anticipated liftoff 
of the Endeavor (vehicle 105) on a sev- 
en-day mission to 163 miles, with a 57- 
degree inclination orbit This will be the 
second flight of the Endeavor. The pri- 



Amateur Radio Via Satellite 



mary pay load is Science Lab "J" with 
12 Get- Away-Special canisters (GAS- 
CAN 's) in the payload bay. Jay Apt 
N5QWL Is expected to operate both 
packet and voice. 

Like earth-based stations, the shut- 
tle crews run tracking programs to 
monitor anticipated coverage areas 
as they orbit the earth. The primary 
system includes a Grid laptop com- 
puter with a modified version of "Graf- 
Trak II" and "Silicon Ephemeris" by 
Silicon Solutions of Houston, Texas. 
Versions of the software have been 
available to amateurs and commercial 
interests for several years, Joe Bijou 
WB5CCJ has recently updated the 
shuttle software and Gil Carman 
WA5NOM of NASA has provided pre- 
punch testing of the package. Ground 
Stations typically use a feature of 
"GrafTrak" to sequence through spe- 
cific satellites as they pass over. The 
shuttle-based version operates from 
the spacecraft point of view to se- 
quence through cities within range 
rather than orbiting objects. Other 
modifications to the software provide 
better and more detailed information 
on mutual visibility possibilities be- 
tween the orbiter and Mir. 

More SAREX missions are in the ear- 
ly planning stages for 1993, Some may 
use the simplified voice-only equip- 
ment while others may have enhanced 
operations for packet, slow-scan and 
additional modes. A good source of in- 
formation for SAREX operations is the 
Johnson Space Center NASA BBS at 
(713)483-2500. To use the BBS, call at 
1200 bps t eight data bits, no parity and 
one stop bit. When prompted for a 
"number, 1 ' enter 62511. AFthough the 
data system will respond to 2400 bps, 
the actual BBS will not. 



AMSAT Nets 

As a supplement to the March 1992 
column, which gave a comprehensive 
list of satellite operation resources, 
here is information about the AMSAT 
nets. 

Table 1 is a list of the current North 
American AMSAT HF nets, thanks to 
AMSAT Net Manager Wray Dudley 
W8GQW/7. For many enthusiasts, 
these nets provide a sole source of up- 
dated satellite schedules and general 
news concerning the amateur satellite 
program. 

The Sunday 15 meter net on 21 280 
kHz can also be heard on an AMSAT- 
OSCAR-13 downlink of 145.955 MHz 
(USB) when the satellite is within range 
of Arizona {home of W8GQW/7). 
AMSAT also sponsors operations nets 
via A-O-13 on 145/950 MHz. The 
schedule of these nets changes to fa- 
vor the orientation of the satellite. A 
current schedule is always included as 
one of the news items covered in the 
HFnets. 

Participation in the A-O-13 opera- 
tions nets is always good and some- 
times quite surprising. On a recent net, 
Stan WA4NFY checked in using an ex- 
perimental antenna built to specifica- 
tions for the satellited ased array for 
Phase-3-D. The prototype patch anten- 
na for 70cm had a better signal into 
A-O-13 than his 40-element crossed 
yagi. AMSAT officers and satellite de- 
signers are often available on these 
nets to answer questions and provide 
updates on future projects. 



Russian Hamsats 
to End? 

The recent political changes in the 
Soviet Union have not left amateur ra- 
dio unscathed. The connection be- 
tween ham activity and the govern- 
ment is not the same as in the U.S. 
Amateur radio is more tightiy con- 
trolled and the satellite efforts are 
sometimes directly funded and admin- 
istered by the government. Cutbacks 
in this funding could end some current 
and future projects. Cash flow diffi- 
culties at the RS control station RS3A 
in Moscow have already resulted in 
staff cuts. 

For several years the RS program 
with its Mode A transponders (2 meters 
up and 10 meters down) has been 
considered the best entry-level satel- 
lite activity. The RS satellites have pro- 
vided the starting point for many ham- 
sat chasers. Other satellite builders 
around the world have gone on to VHF, 
UHF and microwave designs for new 
satellites. 

RS-15 was originally scheduled for 
launch in April. Its future is now in 
question. This satellite was to have a 
2000-kilometer circular orbit, much 
higher than the current RS hamsats 
Other satellite programs beyond RS- 
1 5 (six in all) are also affected and may 
be canceled. 

Efforts to solve the current financial 
difficufties with the RS program are un- 
der way, but the needed aid maybe loo 
late to maintain the program. Let's 
hope not. 



Table 1. Active North-American AMSAT HF Nets 


Net 


Day 


Time 


Frequency (kHz) 


AMSAT East Coast 


Tuesday 


9 p,m. Eastern 


3640 


AMSAT Mid-America 


Tuesday 


9 p.m. Central 


3840 


AMSAT West Coast 


Tuesday 


9 p.m. Pacific 


3840 


AMSAT International 


Sunday 


1900UTC 


U282 


AMSAT International 


Sunday 


1 900 UTC 


21260 


AMSAT International 


Sunday 


2300 UTC 


18155 



Sell your product in 73 Magazine Call Dan Harper & Louise 'Sullivan today 800-225-5083 



Two Meter Special 



2FSCAN 

4? HEAD, 4F SCAN 



$ 5.00 
$12.00 



M0TMIC0RAOC: 

8F CABLE $ 9,30 

SPEAKER $ 7.00 

MICS $10.00 

GEEXEC Us 138-155 MH*, 40 WATT, DRAWER UN IT ONLY . $45.00 EACH: 
WITH ACC, $115.00 EACH. 

GE EXEC II: 4?-50 MH;, 50 WATT, DRAWER UNIT QNLV , £65,00 EACH; 
WITH ACC, GROUP: $110.00 

PORTABLES, STANDARD HX-MG.ZCHAN, 132-144 MH2S75.00 EACH. 
5&MOT MlCOPiS T74RTA 3B03BASP1 1-AU ACC AS & $165.00 EACH, 
80 Sttotdartl Series, 3Q0 Portable with cha*ge?s. 139-150 MHz ... $115,00 
MT 500 HB 150-160, 4F TO^C 1 SET ELEMENTS, AS IS $30,00 

GM1 OR WHITE FOH CUlfflEKT FlYER. 

ALL SALES "CASH" OR '"CERTIFIED FUKD5" SHIFPED BY UPS. 

C.W. W0LT E C0MMUHOE0N3. INC, 

1 113 Cenlral Avenue 
Billings, Monica 591 02 

*FAX*FAX*FAX* 
(406)252-9617 

• TELEPHONE • TELEPHONE * 
C406) 252-9220 



R 




il*«t '* i C v* d 




ICOM 



XVHF 

COMMUNICATIONS 



Lets Talk Radio 
7 days a week 
6 pm to 12 pm 
Spacenet-3 
Transponder 21 
6.2 Audio 



See Us At Dayton 
Booth 310 



9:00 am - 5:30 pm 
weekdays 

Weekends and evenings 
by appointment. 



280 Tiffany Avenue 
Jamestown, New York 14701 



PH. (716)664^6345 

(800) 752-8813 for orders only 



CIRCLE 20 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 14 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 77 




Number 26 on your Feedback card 



TTY LOOP 



Amateur Radio Teletype 



Marc I. Lmvey, M.D., WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
Baltimore MD 21208 

Over the past few years, I have de- 
scribed this column as dealing with ail 
forms of digital communication, not 
just 5-ievel RTTY. This should be evi- 
dent because of the frequent inclusion 
of AMTOR, packet, computers, and 



other more exotic digital modes in its 
content. Today we take a look at anoth- 
er digital mode, prompted by several 
letters from readers requesting pro- 
grams to generate Morse code. 

Morse code? Sure, why not, Morse is 
the ultimate digital mode, consisting of 
a single bit being turned on and off, 
albeit for varying lengths of time, Com- 



puters are ideally suited to the task 
of learning Morse, and such code gen- 
eration is what many of you have 
asked for, 

Interestingly, most of the requests 
have come in for a program for the 
Radio Shack Color Computer, This ca- 
pable Motorola-6809-based computer 
was one of the first computers used by 
amateurs, and, interestingly enough, 
sported a multitasking multi-user oper- 
ating system modeled on UNIX, OS9, 
long before Windows or OS/2 (notice 
the similarity?)* 

Anyway, I looked around on Delphi, 
and located two good programs. Pub- 



lished in the late CLOAD magazine, a 
magazine published on cassette for 
the Radio Shack Color Computer, 
some eleven years ago by a D, Roth- 
stein t these two programs comprise an 
instruction module for Morse code. 
You can download them from the 73 
BBS, under the file name CODE.ZIP. 

For IBM PC clone users, the pro- 
gram listed here in the sidebar may be 
just what you're looking for. This is 
another older program (about nine 
years old), written by Elwood Downey 
WB0OEW. This BASICA program is 
straightforward enough to run in most 

Continued on page 5 1 



Morse Code Program for the IBM PC 



1 ' Morse Code Practice Program. Elwood Downey, WBOOEW, August, 1 983. 

20 ' Written for the IBM PC in Microsoft Basica, V1 .1 , for PC-DOS V1 .1. 

30 'This program may be freely used, traded or copied but the author's 

40 ' name and this stipulation shall remain as comments and the program 

50 ' shal I never be sold for p rof it. 

60 ' 

70 CLS 

80 KEY OFF 

90 ' 

1 00 ' select input source: either from a file, the keyboard or random , 

101 PREPRINT " ALL entries are to be in LOWER case letters" PRINT 

1 02 PRINT* ENTER T TO START," 

1 03 222$ -INKEY$:!FZZZ$= j r THEN 104 ELSE 103 

104 CLS 

110 INPUT "file name? (or 'random' or 4 conO " ( F$ 

120 IF F$ = "random" THEN RANFILE=1 ELSE RANFILE^O 

130 IFRANFILE = 1 THEN RANOOMtZE VAL(RIGHT$(T!ME$,2)): NCHRS=0: 

NGRPS=0 
140 IF RANFILE=0 THEN OPEN F$ FOR INPUT AS n 
150 ' 

160 'select speed 
170 INPUT "wpm? fl ,WPM 
180 * 

190 ' initialize code strings 

200 ' to add more characters, such as apostrophe, increase numcodes, 
21 ' add code stri n g an d character at end of current I ists and add case 
220 ' to main loop, below. 
230 NUMCODES - 41 '.,/?- plus 26 + 1 
240 DIMCODES$(NUMCOOES-1) 
250 D!MCHARS$(NUMCODES-1) 
260 FOR !=0 TO NUMCODES- 1 
270 READCODES${l) 
280 NEXT 

290 FORI=0TGNUMCQDES-1 
300 READ CHARS$(I) 
310 NEXT 
320 ' code strings, in one4o~one correspondence with characters, below. 



to it_n 



tl ill N H U 

I ... , ~ 



1 ■" I 



_Jtr tr m 
I 



l 



I i 



m It IT 

1 ■ 



t 



jt jr 
i 



330 

340 

350 

360 

370 

380 

390 

400 

410 

420 

430 

440 

450 

460 

470 

460 f 

490 ' set up arrow keys to change speed and frequency 

500 PRINT 

510 PRINT CHR$(24); " *; CHR$(25); " to raise or lower tone, *; 

520 PRINT CHR$(27); " "\ CHR$(26J; " for slower or faster code/ 

530 PRINT "Ctrl-Break to quit, F9to pause/' 

540 PRINT 

550 ON KEY{1 1) GOSUB 1040: KEY{1 1) ON 



DATA \.\ ", 

HATA # m H u ^ tf ft _ to to_^ ^n » 

DATA",,-",". 
DATA" — >, 

DATA »*>..." t "-...% *-..*, "—." 

RATA *" — -' h w — — H **- - a * " "- -" 

' characters. 

DATA "A", "B", "0", J 'D", "E", "F", "G", "H" 

DATAT/JVKVLVM" 

DATA "N", n O\ "P\ "G\ "R\ "S", T" 

DATA "U\ "V", *W N , !$* "Y", H Z H 

DATA "u\ "1V2", "3", "4\ "5" 

r\ ATA tt ft h tt (tin ftrytt tt_it 



560 ON KEY(14) GOSUB 1050; KEY(14) ON 

570 ON KEY(12) GOSUB 1090: KEY(12) ON 

580 ON KEY(13) GOSUB 1080: KEY(13)ON 

590 ON KEY<9) GOSUB 1 330: KEY(9) ON 

600' 

610 ' set defaults, init screen. 

620 F - 600 ' initial tone frequency 

630 SIL = 32767 ' special code for no tone 

640 GOSU B 1 1 20 ' calcu late d it, dah and space lengths. 

650 GOSUB 11 60 ' display wpm and freq 

660' 

670 ' define character type checking functions 

680 DEFFNLOWER(C$) = "a"=C$ ANDC$ = "2* 

690 DEFFNUPPER(C$)= "A fl =C$ANDCS= Jf Z'' 

700 DEFFNDIGIT(C$) = "0^C$ANDC$= ,T 9 ir 

710' 

720 f main loop, read (or generate} each character, sound it and print it. 

730 IF RANFILE THEN GOSUB 1240: G0SU9 900: PRINT CHARS$(MORSE);; 

GOTO 870 
740C$ = INPUT$(1,#1) 

750 IF" "=C$ORC$=CHR${13) THEN GOSUB 990: GOTO 060 
760 IF V =C$THEN MORSE =36: GOTO 850 T morse - codes$ array index 

770 IF V =C$ THEN MORSE=37: GOTO 850 

780 IFT=C$THENMORSE=3a:GOTO850 

790 IF "? jr =C$THEN MORSE =39: GOTO 050 

800 IF "^CSTHEN MORSE =40: GOTO 650 

610 IF FNLOWER(C$) THEN CI - CHR$(ASC(C$)-32) 

820 IFFNUPPER(C$)THENMORSE=ASC(C$>ASC{"A"): GOTO 850 

830 IF FNDIGIT(C$)THEN MORSE ^ASC(C$)-ASC( "(T)+26: GOTO 850 

840 GOTO 870 

850 GOSUB 900 

860 PRINT C$; 

870 GOTO 730 

eeo 1 

890 1 sound ditfor eacti "/, dah for each "•" in string codes$(morse) 

900 FOR 1 = 1 TO LEN{CODES$(MORSE)) 

910 IFMID$(CODES$(MORSE),l l 1) = \" THEN GOSUB 1000 ELSE GOSUB 

1010 

920 NEXT 

930 GOSUB 980 

940 RETURN 

950' 

960 ' produce elemental sounds, or silences. 

970 SOUND SIL,DIT: RETURN ' element space 

980 SOUND SIL.ELE^: RETURN ' character space, allow for previous trailing 

990 SOUND SIL,ELE*6: RETURN * word space, allow for trailing, 

1000 SOUND F,DIT; GOSUB 970: RETURN ' dit 

1010 SOUND F,DAH: GOSUB 970: RETURN ' dah 

1020 s 

1030 J change frequency of tone 

1040 F = FM. 104: GOSUB 1180: RETURN 

1 050 F = F/l 104: GOSUB 11 80: RETURN 

1060' 

1070 ' change speed; update element timings. 

1080 WPM = WPM + 1: GOSUB 1120: GOSUB 1180: RETURN 

1090 WPM = WPM-1 ; GOSUB 1 120: GOSUB 1 180: RETURN 

1100' 

1110 ' calculate element timings, units are clock ticks, which are at 18.2hz. 

1 120 IFWPM13THENCWPM = 13 ELSE CWPM=WPM 

1130 DIT = 21 .84/CWPM: DAH = 3*OIT 

(Program continued on pagees) 



?& 7$ Amateur Radio Today • May* 1992 



r 



H4 



F, 



EC TOR rlNDER 



ZERO -IN 
THE SIGNAL! 



HAND-HELD 

PHASE SENSE 

ANTENNAS FOR 

VHP DIRECTION 

FINDING, USES 

ANY FK XCVR. 

COMPASS GIVES 

DIRECTION. 
ARMS FOLD FOR 
STORAGE- TYPE 
VF-14 2 COVERS 
BOTH 2-MTRS k 
220KHZ. OTHER 
MODELS AVAILABLE, 
WRITE OR CALL FOR 
MORE INFO. 
53-50 SHIPPING & TYPE VF-142 

CA- ADD TAX) S129.9S 619- 

RADIO ENGINEERS 565-1319 




\ 



3941 MT, BRUNDAGE AVE. 
SAN DIEGO CA.92 1 1 1 



CIRCLE 58 ON READER SFRVFCE CARD 



THE K1FO 12 ELEMENT 
144 MHz YAGI 



FOI2444 




ELECTRICAL ,VEUnCAll(M& 

Ua«til(ri ...... I244K4 

bi »i Pin* U dB 

riA n*& 

mm 1000 Wim 

40 



MKC KAMCAL SPECIFICATIONS; 

3 rmgm - . , ♦ * . 17ft 4". 

Uoofc . 1 J7V MJfil 1 ft Ahuunun 

n*!mnmti If*' AJubwwpi nm 

WmA PumvR] 13)1 MPH 

All M.haIci* Sta*l I'Jnnrm 

C on ctHiJqrrf gf ■ ■ N-I)*C 

Wfi|jbi .,„,+,.,.,.. 11 h 



ALSO AVA11 AIIIJ- 

KU-5U. RA7-4*. KAS-2UWB, FOIM44, HH5 -i«, FOlfi-220 

FOZJMJ2, FOZ2-ATV, F015411, FUJ3-4J2, FOJ 1-440 

POWER DIVIDERS „«-.« — - JnTACKlNU FHAMRS 



> i i iin i ifi 



Va supply t-hoitr h*rd C4 find p*rta for ihr Hunm huJ ld*c 

Ad J S5 U ffi s.'Ti Tor »pcSi intftnn* 
$7 mmt at MlfftlflPlppJ 
PA r*Bid*ntj 'dd ftt nt*l* ■■!•■ la*. 



RUTLAND ARRAYS 

1703 Warren St. * New Cumberland, PA 17070 
(717) 774-5298 7-10 PHI EST 

CALL OR WRITE FOR OUR NEW CATALOOI 



CIRCLE 7 1 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



DISCOVER LOW PRICES 

PL-}59l*leki' f*NOF US*. CV «• grIliJ2J 
PL-25gSjl»rr-T»Flti"i, USA Ullll 0f I3&3) 
PL^5*GoW-T*non, USA f 1.49h «iM'H 

N ConnKlof iqrMU WM. CQ-FImI 15 <S 

»MJni»riiAtlAfwl0atMl3. buitwfltrl 41% 

tat cra^k-UF Igwtr r$ttlafl. MF - ijHt (3 
CO-HGM WM S5H &HU. T T p# ill Go»*r 15 

IMOwnpotr La44f4.i>w O 
4« Ohm mtp L*ddH-Uo* i J . 

rf i Art*rn tiftm ►■ i 



10Q m(f 



BALUNS 
ueemoff Dcvdopod 

ltafrtW%MMMlMl 

umo#t)nniii| mfr*w 

jupr prrn iM l ri rnr - 
SUtniml mJ—i 

t1« 11 Vm QjfJtrt 6lM iir.ts 
&l * &Ki1L0BlOtti HKHHI 119 4s 
rr-u(CirrTT4i-rfpeBMWB^unM4lCW 124 H 



.{804)484-0140 



R-m BD page Dtseourrt Cotaiog Everything lor urtre antennas, 
connectors, com. Atlow I - € w*tk» for Bulk moil delivery gF 
Cetttog or s*nd $2 fw wUtog b^ Prttnty H*l. Mention ad for 
tti«* pf««. Pnces i^e tufejeci io chmg*, ADO SHIPPING - C*fl 
tor COO. Visa 1 HC welconw. Give card *. tip. date, signature. 
V* re&denls add 4 5H Sales lii r S*e a« m OS T and CO 

Box 6159 * Portsmouth. VA 23703 



CIRCLE ISO OM READER SERVICE CARD 



Dayton Specials 

by mail 




Throw away your 

magnifying glass. 



r 



Find: 



vVIUHl 



Ernest Wfiealtejr W1UHI 

Sox 47 

Richmond. VT 06477 

Born Gd 29. 1«&7 
L Class: General 




s 



Contains 540,000 US calls 

30,000 Canadian calls 

No hard disk required 

Edit and print QSL cards & 

Export to ASCII 

Add your own addresses 

QSL Managers direct from DX calls 

PC 1 .44/1 2MHD !79^5 *59,95 

Macintosh 800K/ 1 ,4M % J9&5 *69.95 
HBPopupfTSR} * 19.95 

WHamBase (For Windows 3.0) M9.95 
HamBase Canada M9.95 

Demo Disk s 5.00 





PCB 
Assembled 

& Tested 

s J04^r 

$ 1 14.95 

• 4 variable length messages 

• CT compatible computer interface 
■ Endless loop record/playback 



In 
ABS 

Enclosure 

* 139.95 



magic l( notch 





* Fully automatic notch audio filter 

* Installs between speaker & rig 

* Work s4 SSB under 59+ carrier 

* Removes carriers, CW, and 
computer RFI 

ll±4tt $ 1 04.95 



UPS Ground in US Included/Foreign Qrtkre add S 10 
Show prices good April and May* 1 992 only 



j»Com 




U*y**l 



•A 



y*it«ic> 



P O Box 194 T Ben Lomond • CA 95005 
(408) 335-9120 FAX 335-9121 



CIRCLE 55 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




& TECHNITRON 

^L-Vsra GMNDJtt* RD mSlCITT, IML446S4 



• HI-PERFORMANCE OflP 

• DUAL BAND mU— 40M 

• COVERS ENTIRE CW/SSB 

• SUPER QUCT 100OSOYN R 

• AUDIO FILTER— IN/OUT 

• CW/SSe SWITCHABLE 

• RF PEAKING 

• RF PRE -AMP 

• RF ATTENUATOR 

• CALIBRATED VFO 

• J B- 10:t VERNIER DRIVE 
» FRONT MOUlSfT SPEAKER 

• CUSTOM METAL CABINET 

• MULTI-PUSH BUTTON SWITCHING 

• SUPER EASY TO ASSEMBLE KIT 

• SOR SERIOUS ORP OPERATING 
• - PROOUCT OF USA * • 




"SHOUP-KJT ■ RX 804O 

available in May '92 

KJC1159 11 

pimieoosaK 



Opbonal tntfimal AC 

power supply HA 
139,95 - I4 00SAH 



BaJtery Hokter Km 
ST 2.95 ^ t3 00 St h 



^SHOUP-Krr f TX8040 WATCHING CW ■TWIN" QRP 
TRANSMITTER $15996 + $6,00 S&H AVAILABLE JUNE "92 

Send *10 SASE for more info and 

list of *Snoup-kits"or phone (51 7> 68S-232 2 

Michigan residents add 4% sales tax 

Quality to win a free fantastic "Shoup-krT RX 8040 receiv- 
er — by mailing a 3* xS" card witfi name, address, prione 
and secret ID mimbef (S digits) for Nov 92 df awing— win- 
ner announced in our advertisement. 



CIRCLE 143 Off READER SERVICE CARD 



_ 100 PAGE 

™ CATALOG 

> Communications Receivers 

_> Portable Receivers 

Scanners 

Amateur HF Transceivers 

VHF-UHF Transceivers 

HTsand Mobiles 

Amateur and SWL Antennas 

Accessories and Parts 

RTTY and FAX Equipment 

Books and Manuals 

This catalog includes prices! 

Send 
$!to 



Universal Radio 

6830 Americana Pkwy. 73 
Reynoldsburg, OH 43068 

Tel. 614 866-4267 



BEAM INDICATOR 




* Bhqht LED iHDtc* tO«S with 

• AOAJSTAHtE BEAM VlWJTH AW 
LOm PATH MMCAT1DN 

■ Cusrou Great Circle Maf am 
vourOIH 

- DecGRATi^ 16" if Iff x 1"i 



See your beam's coverage on a custom Great 
Circle Map with a s/mpfe rotator connection. 

$189.95* 





GREAT CIRCLE MAPS 

Foijf color maps centered on your QTh 

Laminated 22" or 1 6" $35.00* 
Framed16" $59.95* 

Framed 21 ' S74.95' 



■S & n inducted ( a**n**al U .S.| 
CA riBAkfcutt plaase add 7-2S% sates ttx 

Cat or wnft tor mote «k*maSkin 

Vector Control Systems 

1S65 N. Mountain Ave.. Suite 1 04-45 
Upland. CA 91 786 • (714 \ 965-6250 



CIRCLE 78 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 79 




Number 27 on your Feedback card 



INTERNATIONAL 



Amie Johnson N1BAC 
43 Old Homestead Hwy, 
N. Swanzey NH 03431 

Notes from FN 4 2 

This month we are lucky to have a 
language lesson compliments of David 
Cowhig WA1LBP David says that he 
is moving in May to Japan and will be 
gone for two years. He has requested 
a copy of the 73 universal recipro- 
cal licensing form, so if appears that 
he wishes to remain active on the 
bands. 

As I am writing this if is the first of 
March. Part of the correspondence 
that has arrived during the month of 
February is a press release from the 
tn tern a Uona i Teiecom mumca tio n 
Union (ITU) written and released on 21 
January, 1992, tt speaks of the World 
Administrative Radio Conference 
(WARC 921 ^s information is too old to 
make any sense in May, but one thing 
that caught my eye is that the confer* 
ence ends on the 3rd of March, fust two 
days away. I wonder what good things 
and bad things have fallen on the inter- 
national ham community. Have we 
gained or iosi in our quest for frequen- 
cies for our hobby? Oh, to have been a 
member of the team; but, like you, I will 
have to wait for more press releases to 
find out what happened. 

I almost forgot: For the hams in the 
New England area of the United 
States, May 2nd is the date, and the 
location is the Fairgrounds at Deer- 
field t New Hampshire, for the 1992 
Spring Edition of Hoss Traders, And 
don't forget, the gates open at 4 p.m. 
on Friday and overnight camping is ac- 
ceptable. The proceeds go to the 
Shriner Bum Hospital in Boston. See 
you there, thopel—Arnie* NIBAC 

Roundup 

Japan From the JAftL News: 
Radio Stations Exceed 7 Million 
The Ministry of Posts and Telecom- 
munications of Japan reported on 
November 21, 1991, that the present 
number of radio stations in Japan as of 
the end of September 1991 reached 
7.027.215, which is an increase from 
the previous year. 

Amateur radio stations numbered 
1,154,142. which made tl the third 
largest group, accounting for 16.4% of 
the stations The largest group is Ihe 
land mobile stations, with 3.039,034; 
and the second largest group is Ihe 
personal radio stations, with 
2,446.840. 

The group of land mobile stations 
has recent^ been increasing at a re- 
markable rate, as high as 37 percent 
per year. And as a result, its share of 
ail the stations has been growing an- 
nually, 

Alt-Japan ARDF Competition 

The '92 AH-Japan ARDF Compete 



tion will be held in the Nan-Shin area of 
Nagano Prefecture on November 1 st of 
this year. 

Competitors wilt be selected from 
participants of the '91 Ail-Japan ARDF 
Competition and also from panic ipants 
of local ARDF Competitions held on or 
after October 21 ,1991, 

Japanese Language Lesson: More 
than one million hams call Japan their 
GTR As Cycle 22 solar activity contin- 
ues to increase [Or decrease, as the 
case may be, — Amie], we* II have more 
and more opportunities to work JAs. 
Japanese hams study books such as 
English tor Ham QSO by JA1 ANG and 
Conversational American English for 
Ham rtacto by Roy Waite W9PQN in 
order to improve their English. We 



port is 59 (I often hear Japanese hams 
giving reports to each other (using En- 
glish!!) In this way so you do the same.] 

Wa-ta-ku-shi no QTH wa [a-mer-ri-ka 
no shu-to Washington DC] ka-ra ju-ni 
ki-n>mee[mayHo-ru ku-rai no to-ko-ro 
de-su. My OTH is about 12 kilometers 
from [the U.S. capital. Washington 
DC, t so they won't confuse DC with 
Washington state]. 

Wa-ta-ku-shi wa Ml. Vernon a-ma> 
chya mu-sen ku-ra-bu no mem-ba de- 
su. I am a member of the Mt. Vernon 
ARC. 

Na-mae wa David de-su. My name is 
David. (If the Japanese operator gives 
his name as Tomo, refer to him as To- 
mo-san. Do not put *san after your own 
name.) 

[To-moJ-san no et-go wa tae-hen 
hoo-zu de-su ne. Your [Tomo's] Em 
glish is very good 

Nhhon-go de nan te i-ma-su-ka, How 
do you say thai in Japanese? 

If you have a solid contact, you might 
ask the Japanese operator how to say 
some phrases in Japanese. You can 



We can't expect people around 
the world to speak to us in 
English forever. " 



U.S. hams, however, have no book to 
teach us the Japanese we need to get 
through a simple QSO with a Japanese 
amateur in Japanese. Japanese hams 
rarely enjoy the luxury Of working DX 
(I ike us I J in their own language. Not 
quite fair, is it? We can't expect people 
around the world to speak to us in En- 
glish forever. 

Here I'll present a few Japanese 
phrases you can try on your next J A 
contact. They should get a big kick out 
of it. The J A stations I contact get a bit 
of a shock when I come back to them in 
Japanese! 

First, a few comments on Japanese 
pronunciation. Although the Japanese 
writing system, which uses Chinese 
characters and two 51 -symbol syl- 
labaries, and the grammar are difficult, 
Japanese pronunciation is very easy. 
Place equal stress on each syllable. 
Not Toyota butTo-yo-ta. Not Vaesu but 
Ya-e-su. I mark long vowel sounds by 
doubling the vowel. My transcription is 
essentially the Hepburn system, a sys- 
tem used internationally for writing 
Japanese using the Roman alphabet, 
My main departure from the Hepburn 
system is adding dashes between syl- 
lables. Where the Hepburn spelling 
might be misleading. I have placed a 
close English equivalent in brackets, 
Remember, equal stress on each sylla- 
ble is the key, 

O-hi-o go-zai-ma-su- Good morning 
[Pronounce o-hi-o like the state of 
Ohio. It's morning in Japan when we 
work them in the evening.] 

Wa-ta-ku-shi no QTH wa [ba-ji-ni-a 
shu] de-su. My QTH is the I state of 
Virginia], 

Re[fey]-por-to wa five-nine. Your re- 



thank him by saying: 

P"o-mo]-san wa lai-hen it ni-hon-go 
no sen-sei de-su. You [Tomo] are a 
very good Japanese teacher. 

To-te-mo la-no-shi QSO o doo-mo a- 
rt-ga-tc-go-zai-ma-shi-ta. Thank you for 
a very enjoyable QSO. 

Ma-ta doo-zo yo-ro-shi-ku o ne-gai 
shi-ma-su. Please give me a call anoth- 
er time. 

Try some of these phrases on your 
next contact with JA. It should get you 
out of the carbon copy QSO rut. Give a 
JA operator a good laugh and improve 
your Japanese at the same time! 

If you would like to learn to speak 
simple conversational Japanese fairly 
quickly, consider Japanese for Begin- 
ners, published by Gakken. You can 
purchase it with two cassette tapes. 
This book takes you through the essen- 
tials of Japanese grammar and builds 
up to a 1 .200 work vocabulary in 180 
(small) pages, Mot a large vocabulary, 
but considerably larger than the En- 
glish vocabulary of many of the DX sta- 
tions you are working now Have fun! 
73 de David Cowhig. WA1LBP 

[What you have seen is the first in a 
series from David to "Ye Old Rf Out- 
put, ** newsletter of the Mt. Vernon 
ABC. // you have any comments for 
David you had better hurry because he 
is leaving in May for two years in 
Japan. His address ts: 63 f 7 May Blvd. , 
Alexandria VA 223W- Or send him 
a packet message to WA1LBP @ 
N4QO.MQ. USA. —Amie} 

Scotland Information from "Paddy" 
McGiil GM3MTH: The Scottish Tourist 
Board (Radio Amateur) Expedition 



Group, STB(RA)EG. would like to an- 
nounce its awards program for 1992. 
The purpose of this group is: (a) To set 
up worldwide Communications Sta- 
tions in Scotland that are Unique, 
Scenic, Cultural, Historic or in any 
other way relating to Scotland; (b) To 
make the Public more aware of the 
Hobby Of Amateur Radio through a 
Public Relations display at each event. 
All events are open to the Public. 

The THISTLE AWARD and The 
SUPREME TARTAN BANNER 
AWARD are issued by the Group on a 
continuous basis. Both awards are in 
colour. Claims for ALL Scottish Tourist 
Board Awards should be sent to; 
Awards Manager {Robbie GM4UQG), 
PO Box 59. Hamilton, Scotland ML3 
6QB. 

The events for this year are: (1 ) Scot- 
tish Activity Weekend — 3rd weekend 
in April each year; (2) Castles on the 
Air; (3) Eight Nations National Trust 
Event: and (4) International St. An- 
drews Day. The planned frequencies 
are (±)i C.W. 3510, 7010, 10140, 
14010, 21010, 24905, 28010 MHz; 
SSB 3765, 7065, 14140 & 14240 t 
18130, 21250, 24950, 28400 to 28600 
MHz. The times of the events are nor- 
mally Saturdays, 0800 to 2200 UTC, 
and Sundays, 0900 to approximately 
1500 UTC. Times are subject to 
change. 

If you wish a list of events/tnfor* 
mation package, it is available from: 
John "Paddy" McGill GM4MTH, 9. 
Ramsay PI., Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, 
Scotland, MLS SRE. Please send two 
second class stamps or equivalent for 
return postage. Tel: (0236) 440495; 
FAX: 0236434194; International: 
+44236434194, 

The following is a quick list of events 
through May; April 11th. GB2SMC, 
Scottish Museum of Communication, 
Grand Opening in Bo'ness; April 18/19, 
GB2STB, 1st Annual Scottish Activity 
Weekend, 12 Scottish Regional Sta- 
tions, Clubs, and individual stations, 
Certificate & Trophies; May 16/17, 
GB40CCA, Crathes Castle 400th An- 
niversary, 2nd Annual Castles on the 
Air. nine castles in UK and Ireland. Cer- 
tificate. [I will put the Certificate and 
Trophy Information on the 73 BBS 
in the "73 International" area, t re- 
member that several years ago the 
STB(RA)EG operated from some of the 
distilleries. Why not this year? I guess 
I will have to write Paddy and find 
out.— Amie} 

U.S.A. From the International Mis- 
sion Radio Association (IRMA) 
Newsletter: IRMA has been developed 
to provide transfer of traffic for mission- 
ed of all denominations and for other 
volunteer services. Their traffic ham 
dfing net operates Monday through 
Saturday, from 1900-2000 GMT 
(Daylight Saving Time 1800*1900 
GMT) on 14.280 MHz. If you would 
like to receive more information, join 
IRMA, or receive their newsletter, con- 
tact: IRMA Newsletter Editor, Rev. 
Michael Mullen, CM WA2KUX. St. 
John's University, Jamaica. NY, USA 
11439.1 



80 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 




"The beginner's guide to the exciting 
world of amateur radio." 



Radio Fun is packed full of 
information to help you get more fun 
out of amateur radio. Basic ''how-to" articles 
will get you up and running on packet, ATV, RTTY, 
DXing, and the dozens of other activities that make amateur radio 
such a great hobby. You* 11 get equipment reviews geared toward the 
newcomer. We'll help you upgrade to a higher class license with 
monthly columns designed to teach you what you need to know in a fun 
and exciting way. You'll find it all, and more, in the pages of Radio Fun. 

Don't wait another minute. Subscribe today for only $12.97 for one 
year. That's 12 issues of the only ham radio magazine that is geared 
especially for the newcomer, or any ham who wants to get more fun and 
excitement out of amateur radio— Radio Fun ! 



12 issues for only $12.97 
1-800-257-2346 



r 

i 



LI YES ! Sign me up right now! 



1 2 issues of Radio Fun 
for $12,97. 



i 



NAME 



CALL 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



Check 



STATC 



ZIP 



wc 



Visa 



CARD* 



EXPIRES 



Class License 



Year licensed 



73 Subscriber _ 



QST subscriber 



CQ Subscriber 



I 
I 



Mail to: Radio Fun, P.O. Box 4926, Manchester, NH 03108 
[Or call 800-257-2346 (in NH call 625-1 163), FAX: 603-669-28351 



Canada &&I V,QQ pdus ,70 GST. Foreign add $ [2.00 surface, S3G,00 airmail , Newsstand Rule $18,00. Basic 
I Subscription Rate $14.97, Monthly publication begins 9/91 , 04H I 




CA-2x4MAX 

Gain & Waver 

UfiMHzS.BdB 

s /a wave x 3 

44&MHi11.9dB 

B /e wave x B 

Mai Power; 200 watts 

Length: 17' 9" 

Connector: 

UHF ISO-239] 



146/446 MHz 
Base/Repeater 





CA-&4WX 
Gain & Wave: 

146MH* 6,5dB 

s/a wave 1 2 

446 MHz 9.{]dB 

s/t wave 1 5 
Max Power: 2DQ watts 
Length: 1GT 
Connector; 

UHF (SO-fflti | 



CA-2X4FX 
Gain £ Wave: 

14&MH* 4.5dB 
V* wave 

446MHz 7.2dB 
s /a wave 1 3 
Max Power: 200 watte 
Length: 5' 11" 
Connect" 

UHF JSO-239) 



Modem, High-Performance Stations use L-Uh'itiY 
Antennas, Duplexers, Triplexers and Accessories! 



COMET PRESTIGE 

T24KI Gold Center Conductor 




CPR-5800 

Bain & Wave: 
HGMKzSM 

446MHz 1MB 

£ /b wave x 3 

Max Power: 120 watts 
Length: 5' 
Connector: 
UHF jPL-259) 



CPR-54G0 

Gain ft Wave: 
146MHz 15dB 
f/2 wave 

mm: e.odB 

5 /h wave 1 1 
Max Power: 120 watts 
Length: 3' 2" 

Connector: 
UHF (PL-259J 




NCG 



NC6 00- 

1275 N. Grove Street, Anaheim, GA 92806 
(714)630-4541 * (800) 962-2611 

CALL FOP COMPLETE CATALOG OR NEAREST DEALER 



2x4 Series 



Best Sellers 




CA-2x4NIB 

Gain & Wave: 

146MHi4.5dB 
Vt wave 

446MHz 7.0rfB 
5 /a wave x 3 
Max Power: 

150 watts FM 
Length: 4' 10* 
Connector: 

UHF (PL-259) 



CF-41GA 



i 



CA-2I4SR 
Gain & Wave: 

146MHz 1MB 

V& wave 

446MHz S.2dB 

Vb wave i 2 
Max Power: 

150 watts FM 
Length: 3' 4" 
Connecter: 

UHF (PL-259) 



NEW B Series 

Black Anodized 



V3 




* i 




■'^3 




i^m* 




U 




w 




*~~ ■ 




l£2 


|||il- 





, ;-,; , 


u 


■ 


o 





Gain £ Wave: 
T46MKr 2.15dB 
Vi wave 
446MMz 5dB 
5 /a wave 1 2 

Max Power: 5D watts 

Length: JT 

CorsnEctor: 
UHF (PL-259}, OR 
HMO (B-20 HMO) 



Gain & Wave: 

146MHz QdB 
Vi wave 
446MHz 2,15tfB 
Vzwave 
Max Power: 50 watts 
Length: 12* 
Connector: 
UHF (PL-259), OR 
HMO {G 10 N'MO) 



CF-416QK 



21V! 70cm DUPLEXERS CF-416A: M UHF Conns w/Leads 

Power: 146MHz BDM CF-416QK: ATI UHF Conns w/o leads 

" 446MHz 5QDW CF-416-OI: Ditto, but 440 Input 

N'Riale Conn, w/o Leads 



CIRCLE 54 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 81 




Number 2 8 on your Feedback card 



ARTER W BUY 



Turn your old ham and computer gear into cash now. Sure, you can watt for a 
ham test to try and du mp it , but yo u know you'll get a far mo re reali stic pr i ce if you h ave 
it out where 100 r 000 active ham potential buyers can see it than the few hundred local 
hams who come by a flea market table. Check your attic, garage, cellar and closet 
shelves and gel cash for your ham and computer gear before it's too old to selL You 
know y o u 5 re n ot goi ng to use it agai n , so why I ea ve it f or your wido w to t h ro w out? That 
stuff isn't getting any younger! 

The 73 Flea Market, Barter V Buy, costs you peanuts (almost) — comes to 35c a 
word for individual (noncommercial) ads and $1.00 a word for commercial ads. Don't 
plan on telling a long story. Use abbreviations, cram it in. But be honest. There are 
plenty of hams who love to fix things, so if it doesn't work, say so. 

Make your list, count the words, including your call, address and phone number. 
Include a check or your credit card number and expiration. If you're placing a 
commercial ad r include an additional phone number, separate from your ad. 

This is a monthly magazine, not a daiiy newspaper, so figure a couple months 
before the action starts; then be prepared. If you get too many calls, you priced it low. 
If you don't get many calls, too high. 

So get busy. Blow the dust off, check everything out, make sure it still works right 
and maybe you can help make a ham newcomer or retired old timer happy with that 
rig you're not using now. Or you might get busy on your computer and put together a 
list of small gear/parts to send to those interested? 

Send your ads and payment to the Barter V Buy t Sue Colbert. Forest Road, 
Hancock NH 03449 and get set for the phone catfs, 



Deadline ton h# June classified; ie April 13, 1992, 

HAM RADIO REPAIR CENTER, quality 
workmanship. Solid state or tube, ail 
makes and models. Also repair HF amplifi- 
ers. A-Z Electronic Repair, 3638 East, In- 
dian School Rd.. Phoenix AZ 8501 8. (602) 
95&-3024. BNB220 

FINALLY HEAR those unreadable signals 
buried in noise, heterodynes, tuner up- 
pers. The REVOLUTIONARY new JPS 
audio filter NIR-10, digital signal process- 
ing, simple hook up. deep discounted 
$379.00 delivered! Authorized dealer: 
Davis RF Co., P.O. Box 230-S, Carlisle MA 
01741, 24-HR. orders (300) 484-4002, 
CODE 1356. BNB254 

QSL CARDS— Look good with top quality 
printing. Choose standard designs or fully 
customized cards. Request free brochure, 
samples (stamps appreciated) from 
Chester QSLs r 310 Commercial, DepL A, 
Emporia KS 66601. FAX (316) 342- 
4705. BNB434 

REVOLUTIONARY HYBRID AERIAL 

WIRE: 168-strand copper "FLEX- 
WEAVE"™, #14, strong, Ultra Flexible, 
ties in knots, nonstretch, won't rust/klnk 
like copper weld, $34 first 275' (minimum), 
$.1 2/ft. thereafter includes shipping! Cat- 
alog $1 .00. DAVIS RF Co., P.O. Bok 230- 
S, Carlisle MA 01741 . <S00) 464-4002, 
CODE 1356 BNB557 

COAX, GROUND RADIAL WIRE, lowest 
cost, top quality, Mil Spec HG-213, $.36/ 
ft,; RG^X, $.19; RG-58, $.18; LOW LOSS 
Balden equiv, RG-9913, $.39; any 
lengths. Radiai wire #16, $33/1000 ft, in- 
cludes shipping! Immediate shipment. 
Catalog, $1.00 DAVIS RF Co., P.O. Box 
230-S, Carlisle MA 01741. (800) 484- 
4002, CODE 1 356. BNB562 

WIRE ANTENNAS AND IBM SOFT- 
WARE for hams. Send 29c stamp for cata- 
log- Homebrew Electronics, P.O. Box 
3294 T Trenton N J 08650. BNB701 

RIG REPAIR by 20-year ham. Fast, rea- 
sonable. Skip With row, 5404 S. Waiden 
Street. Aurora CO 8001 5. (303) 693-0997. 

BIMB702 

IBM PC VIDEO DIGITIZER 640 BY 480 
RESOLUTION, 256 gray levels, $69.98. 
Demo disk, $3. Information, $1, Color- 
burst, Box 3091 , Nashua NH 0306L 

BNB703 



JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES: Amateurs, 
SWLs please send full details, telephone 
number to: Bob Ellis, Post Office Box 
7349, Winter Haven FL 33863-7349. 

BNB706 

ROSS 9 $$$$ NEW May (ONLY): KEN- 
WOOD SM-220 $369.90, TH-75A 
$349,99, TH-315A $299.90, TM-411A 
$319.99. ICOM 761 $2099-90, 725 
$715.00, BC-50 530.00, BP82 $33.90, 
YAESU SC*1 $139.99, 73RTT $265.90, 
NCI 5 $69.99, SHURE 444D $56.90, 526T 
$74,90, ALLIAMCE HD73 $136,90, U105 
$51 .90 ALL LIMITED TIME OFFER CALL 
OR SEND 2 STAMPS FOR MORE SPE- 
CIALS. LOOKING FOR SOMETHING 
MOT LISTED OR HARD TO FIND CALL 
OR WRITE, Over 9000 ham-related items 
in stock for immediate shipment. Mention 
ad. Prices cash, F.OB, Preston. HOURS 
TUESDAY-FRIDAY 9:00 TO 6:00, 9:00- 
2:00 P.M. MONDAYS. CLOSED SATUR- 
DAY & SUNDAY, ROSS DISTRIBUTING 
COMPANY, 78 SOUTH STATE, PRE- 
STON ID 83263. (208) 852-0830. BNB707 

EMERGENCY SUPPLIES: Disaster pre- 
paredness packs for your shack, auto, of- 
fice, etc. Free catalog. Slates Products, 
P.O, Box 4375T. Walnut Creek CA 94596. 

BNB708 

GIANT SOLAR PANELS $44.00 EA! Ex- 
cellent Prices/Solar Equipment/ Acces- 
sories. Free Information/Send Stamped 
Envelope, Catalog $3.00, To: Pak Rat 
Electronics, P.O. Box 690073, Houston 
TX 77269, (713)893-0313, BNB715 

SIMPLEX REPEATERS $149. 00f We 
manufacture them ourselves. Pak Rat 
Electronics, (713) 893-0313, BNB716 

ELECTRON TUBES: All types and sizes. 

Transmitting, receiving, microwave... 
Large inventory = same day shipping. 
Daily Electronics, P,0, Box 5029, Comp- 
ton CA 90224, (800) 346-6667 or (213) 
774-1255. BNB719 

WE HAVE IT! AEA, Astron, Butternut, 
Callbook, Comet, Diamond, Hustler, 
Kantronics, Larsen Antennas, MFJ, Radio 
Shack, Smiley, antennas, Ten-Tec, Valor 
antennas, and more. Small town service 
with discount prices, Dandys t 120 N, 
Washington, Wellington KS 87152. (316) 
326-6314. BNB722 

MINIATURE POLICE RADAR TRANS- 
MITTER one mile range, $41 a&sembied, 



$31.00 kit, (219) 489-1711. P.O. Box 
80096, Fort Wayne IN 46B98. BNB725 

BUILD YOUR OWN WIRE ANTENNAS, 
parts, GROUND RADIAL WIRE, open- 
wire feedlines, copper-weld, insulators, 
coax, Dacron rope, baluns, etc., LOWEST 
PRICES, Catalog, $1.00. DAVIS RF Co. t 
P.O. Box 230-S, Carlisle MA 01741 . {800) 
484-4002, CODE 1 356, BN8726 

HAM RADIO REPAIR Experienced, reli- 
able service, Robert Hall Electronics, 
1660 McKee Rd,, Suite A, San Jose CA 
951 16. (408) 729-8200. BNB751 

PICTURE QSL CARDS of your shack, 
etc. from your photo or black ink artwork. 
500 £28,00, 1,000 $44.50. Also non-pic- 
ture cards. Custom printed cards, send 
specifications for estimate. Send 2 
Stamps for illustrated literature. Generous 
sample kit $2.00, half pound of samples 
$3.00. Raum's RD2, Orchard Road, 
Coopersburg PA 1 8036. BNB756 

ALUMINUM MAST -2" OD x .25" wall 
type 6061 -T6. 6' $39.95, 9' $59,95, UPS 
paid lower 48. Lengths to 24 T in stock! 
Doug/WS9W, Box 3S4, Stoughton Wl 
53589. BNB757 

WANTED: HAM EQUIPMENT AND OTH- 
ER PROPERTY. The Radio Club of Junior 
High School 22 NYC, Inc., is a non-profit 
organization, granted 501 (CX3) status by 
the IRS, incorporated with the goal of us- 
ing the theme of Ham Radio to further and 
enhance the education of young people 
nationwide. Your property donation or fi- 
nancial support would be greatly appreci- 
ated and acknowledged with a receipt for 
your tax deductible contribution. Please 
look over whatever unwanted equipment 
you may have, and call us. We will pick up 
or arrange shipping. You will receive the 
tax deduction, but most important, the 
privilege of knowing that your gift really 
made a difference in the education and 
upbringing of a child, You are invited to 
check into the WB2JKJ "22 Crew" 
CLASSROOM NET, 7 AM EST on 7.238 
MHz. or on 21.395 throughout the day. 
Hope to meet all of our friends at the 
Kncxville Hamfest, this years Tennessee 
State Convention, June 6 in Knoxville TN, 
Write us at: The RC of JHS 22 NYC, INC., 
P.O, Box 1052, New York NY 10002. 
Round the clock HOTLINES: Voice (516) 
674-4072 r FAX (516) 674-9600. BNB762 

ELIMINATE MULTIPLE NOISE TONES in 

your receiver audio output. The revolu- 
tionary new JPS noise filter, rnodei #NF- 
60, Digital Signal Processing simple hook 
up to speaker jack. Unlike other Notch Fil- 
ters, notches out multiple varying tones. 
Deep Discounted: $138. 50 delivered 
continental U.S.! (Elsewhere $150.00 plus 
shipping.) Authorized JPS dealer: Davis 
RF Co., P.O. Box 230-S, Carlisle MA 
01741. 24-HR orders: (800) 484-4002, 
CODE 1356. BNB763 

SOLAR POWERED HAMS! The Sun- 
switch is a charge controller to protect 
your batteries from over charge. Power 
MOSFETs are used, no relays! Easy to 
build kit. $34.95 plus $2.50 shipping. Sun- 
light Energy Systems, 2225 Mayflower 
NW, Massillon OH 44647. BNB774 

"HAMLOG" COMPUTER PROGRAM 
Full features. 18 modules. Auto-logs, 7- 
band WAS/DXCC. Apple, IBM, CP/M. 
KAYPRO. TANDY, C126 $24.95. 73- 
KA1 AWH, PB201S, Peabody MA 01960, 

BNB775 

PERSONAL REPEATER HANDBOOK. 
How to set up your own repeater. $16. 
Electron Processing, Box 68, Cedar Ml 
49621 (616)228-7020. BNB777 



LAMBDA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB Inter- 
national amateur radio club for gay and 
lesbian hams. On-air skeds, monthly 
newsletter, and annual gathering at Day- 
ton, (215) 978-LARC- P,0 Box £4810, 
Philadelphia PA 19130. BNB812 

73 MAGAZINE INDEX 1960-1990. Book 
$15 or software $20. The world's largest 
(60,000 reference) amateur radio index 
1909-1990. Software $85. QST, CQ, HR. 
or RAOCOM indices, S10-S20. Write; Dl- 
DAH Publishing, P.O.B. 7366, Nashua NH 
03060-736B. (603) 878-3628. BNB813 

FREE SHAREWARE AND HAM CATA- 
LOG for IBM or CoCo, Morse code com- 
puter interfaces, $49,95, Dynamic Elec- 
tronics, Box 896 r Hartselle AL 35640, 
205-773-2758. BNB615 

BIG $$$ $£$ $$$♦ VCR, stereo, TV repair, 
incredible manual filled with the latest re^ 
pair tips. Recession proof yourself. Re- 
duce imports. Only $39.95, Berge Sys- 
tems, Unit 342-ST, 253 Coliege, Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada M5T 1 R5< BNB81 6 

DIGITAL SWR and POWER METER, As- 
sembled, Kit, or Plans, with Alarm and Set 
Points. FREE information. RUPP ELEC- 
TRONICS, 5403 Westbreeze, Fort Wayne 
IN 46804. 219-432-3049. BNB831 

KENWOOD 430S OWNERS! Stop-scan 
resumes scanning after SIGNAL drops, 
$28.00, kit $18.00. R5000 OWNERS! Illus- 
trated modifications booklet; automatic 
scanning after SIGNAL drops! $12.00. 
SASE free catalog. Jobco t R1 Bon 386, 
Alexandria IN 46001 . BNB832 

TELEX HY-GAIN Antenna's, Rotors and 
Replacement rotor parts, Cushcraft, Bark- 
er and Williamson, Periphex batteries, 
ARRL Books, Pyramid power supplies, 
ORE scanner amplifiers and converters, 
Surplus Tubes. Atkinson & Smith, 17 
Lewis St. Ealontown NJ 07724. (800) 542- 
2247. BNB835 

FREE PLANE ANTENNA. Can be cut 

From 140Mhz to 130QMhz. Complete con- 
struction INFOPACK. Send $3.00 to 
LYNN JOHNSON ELECTRONICS, Box 
51 268, San Jose CA 951 51 -1268. 

BN3836 

FCC COMMERCIAL LICENSE PREPA- 
RATION RADIOTELEPHONE-RADIO- 
TELEGRAPH, Latest home study fast 
easy audio video, FREE details WPT Pub- 
lications 1 -800-800-7588. BNB840 

ONLY NINE Radio Shack parts builds a 
30/40 meter QRP transmitter'! Complete 
plans-only $5F DWM ENTERPRISES, 
1709 N. West, #103, Jackson M! 49202. 

BNB341 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS-etched, 
drilled, tin-plated. Single sided $1.25/sq. 
inch. No setup charge. Send negative or 
artwork ($1 0, 00 for neg ati ve) We can gen- 
erate artwof K from your schematic. CHEL- 
CO ELECTRONICS, 61 Water St, Mayvilie 
NY 1 4757 1 -800-388-8521 , BNB842 

SECRET SCANNER frequencies: Feder- 
al, Police, Aero, Military, Cellular, Surveil- 
lance, also SWL & CB Books. Big FREE 
catalog! CRB Research, Box 56-ST, Com- 
mack NY 11 725, BNB843 

DAYTON SPECIALS: DISCOUNTS on 
B&W line, JPS DSP AF & NF filters, 
Bencher, 25% OFF STARTREK PORTA- 
BLE FREQUENCY COUNTERS!! Wire, 
coax. Dacron Rope, etc. Catalog $1 .00, 
Authorized dealer. DAVIS RF Co., PO 
Box 230-SD, Carlisle MA 01741 1-800- 
464-4002 CODE 1356 (Orders), 508- 
369-1738. BNB844 



82 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



WANTED AMATEUR RADIO DONA- 
TJON AND CONTRIBUTION from loom 
America, Yaesu, USA Ceritto, CA Radio 
Sales. References Available Upon Re- 
quest. Mac Arthur Herman Moore, 5230 
Heston Street, Philadelphia PA 19131 
KA3LLY. BNB845 

INEXPENSIVE HAM RADIO EQUIP- 
MENT. Send postage stamp for list. Jim 
Brady— WA4DSQ, 3037 Audrey Dr M Gas- 
toni a NC 28054 . BN BB90 

MORSE CODE MUSIC? Yes it's true! Now 
the Morse code alphabet can be learned 
and enjoyed while doing aerobics, jog- 
ging, driving, or dancing. Order "RHY- 
THM OF THE CODE" cassette single hit 
today! Send $5.95 (plus $2 S&H) to P.O 
Bo* 319, Dept St., Weymouth MAQ210B. 
For Information send SASE . BN B899 

AMATEUR RADIO REPAIR!! All makes- 
maximum labor per unit, $80 00- TELO 
(Dan), 1302 S. Uplands Dr., Camano Is- 
land WA S8292. {206) 387-3558. BNB900 

COLLEGE $$$$$ FOR THE ASKING! 

Send SASE for FREE copy of " 10 Ways to 
Stretch Your Scholarship Chances" to Fu- 
tures Unlimited, 447 Winding Way, 
Clarfcsville TN 37043-5191. (73 ffom 
NX7T) BNB901 

U.S. REPEATER MAPBOOK— A must for 
the mobile operator Covers 28-1200 
Mhz, includes all 50 States, with maps. 
$9.95 + $2.50 s/h. DOYLE COMMUNICA- 
TIONS -B&, Route 8 Box 18 T Lake Pleas- 
ant NY 12108, BNB902 

HEATHKIT NOSTALGIA— ReHve the his- 
tory of the company which developed and 



manufactured the popular electronic kits. 
.Pictures and stories of and by the people 
who were involved. 1204 pages. Send 
$9.95 (WA residents add sales tax) to 
Heath Nostalgia, 4320^1 96th S.W, F Suite 
B^1 1 1 , Lynnwood WA 98036. BNB903 

HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS: ARRL 
Handbooks, 1st 1926, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 
11th, 20th. 26th, 29th, 32nd: 1st edition 
200 Meters Down: large number of QST in 
long broken sequences from 1921 to 
1954: some R/9 T Radio and CQ: 1936 Ra- 
dio Antenna Handbook: Design Modern 
Radio Receding Sets 1922 Vol 1,2: 100 
Radio Hookups Muhleman 1924: Radio 
Hookups Sleeper, 5, 1922, $500.00 plus 
packing shipping; John Broltey, 1225 Los 
Pueblos, Los Alamos NM 87544. BNB904 

COMMUNICATION AT JTS BEST! AR- 
900/950 $245.00, AR-1000XC $399.00, 
AR-2500 $46900, AR-3000 $969.00 T Ex- 
tended Warranties. CB's, Scanners, 
Radar detectors, and more. Free Ship- 
ping. Visa/MC/Diners. Turbo Electronics, 
P,CX Box 8034, Hicksville NY 11802. In- 
quiries; 51 6-938-1 946/orders 1-800-33^ 
TURBO. BNB905 

BATTERY PACK REBUILDING: SEND 
YOUR PACK / FAST SERVICE, ICOM: 
BP2/BP3/BP22 $18.95, BP5/BP8/BP23 
$24.95. BP24^BP70 $26.95, BP7 $34.95. 
KENWOOD PB21 $14.95, PB21H/PB6 
$17.95, PB25/26 $22.95, YAESUt FNB9/ 
10/17 $19.95, FNB3/4/4A/11/14 $29.95, 
HEATH1 10/310 $26,95. HWA120/320 
$34.95, HWA1 25/325 $39.95, '"COM- 
PLETE NEW PACKS": ICOM BPS(800 
MAH) $34.95, (1000) $44,95, (1200) 
$49,95, BP83 $29.95 T BP84 $39.95. YAE- 
SU: FNB2 (600} $19.95, FNB14 (1000) 



$39 95, FN812(6O0)$44,95, FNB17(600) 
$29.95, FN84SL (750) $39.95. SANTEC: 
142/1200 $22.95. "U-DO-IT INSERTS" 
ICOM: BP3/BP22 $14.95, BP5 $20.95, 
BP8 $19.95. KENWOOD: PB21H/24 
$14,95, PB25/26$17.95.TEMPO/S/1/2/4/ 
15 $20.95. YAESU: FNB10$14.95 + FNB4/ 
4A/11 $26.95. AZDEN/300 $14.95. FREE 
CATALOG. $4.00 Shipping/order, 
PA i 6%, VISA-M/C +$3.00, CUNARD, 
R.D. 6 Box 104, Bedford PA 15522. (814) 
623-7000. BNB913 

WANTED: BUY & SELL M types of Elec- 
tron Tubes. Cafl toll free 1 {800} 421-9397 
or 1 (612) 429-9397. C & N Electronics. 
Harold Bramstedt, 6104 Egg Lake Road. 
Hugo MN 5503S. BNB915 

THE PERFECT GIFT! Digital conversion 
of any VHS tape to and from any TV sys- 
tem format (NTSC/PAL/SECAM). Include 
where the tape will be played, and you will 
receive a copy in that system, $15 per 
hour, $5 blank tape, $2.50 S/H per tape. 
Send to: Steve Kittelsen, 1711 S. 11th. 
0134, Bozeman MT 59715. (406J-585- 
9433). BNB916 

COMMODORE 64 HAM PROGRAMS-8 
disfc sides over 200 Ham programs 
$16,95, 29c stamp gets unusual software 
catalog of Utilities, Games, Adult and 
British Disks. Home-Spun Software, Box 
1064-BB, Estero FL 33928. BNB917 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS for projects 
in 73, Ham Radio, QST, ARRL Handbook. 
List SASE. FAR Circuits, 18N640 Field 
Ct, Dundee IL 60118. BNB966 

AZDEN SERVICE by former factory tech- 
nician. Southern Technologies Amateur 



Radio, Inc., 10715 SW 190 St. #9, Miami 
FL 331 57. (305) 238-3327. BNB979 

COMMODORE 64 REPAIR Fast turn 
around. Southern Technologies Amateur 
Radio, 10715 SW 190th Street #9, Miami 
FL 33157. (305) 238-3327. BNB982 

HOBBY/BROADCASTING/HAM/CD/ 
SURVEILLANCE transmitters, amplifiers, 
cable TV, science, bugs, other great 
projects I For catalog, call/write (916) 534- 
0417. PANAXIS, Box 130-S9, Paradise 
C A 95967. BNB991 

AMATEUR RADIO REPAIR: FCC li- 
censed, 17 years experience, lab quality 
NBS traceable test equipment, reason- 
able rates, G.B. Communications, Inc., 
963 Birch Bay, Lynden Road, Lynden WA 
98264. (206) 354^5884. BNB993 

IRON POWDER-FERRJTE CORE KJT 5 

each T37-2, T37-6, T5G-2, T50-6, T68-2 t 
T68-6, FT37-43, FT37-61 , FT50-43. FT50- 
61. $12.50 Postage Paid CK/MO, (Cata- 
log, large SASE), KA7QJY Components, 
P.O. Box 3893. Logan UT 84321. BNB995 

ROTOR PARTS ROTOR service, ROTOR 
accessories: Brak-D-Lays, Quik-Con- 
nects, Pre-Set mods. NEW models for 
sale. Free catalog. C.A.T.S., 7368 SR 105, 
Pembervilie OH 43450. BN B996 

SURPLUS. HUGE QUANTITIES. LOW- 
EST PRICES in America! Dealers wanted 
Catalogs, $3. Surplus Traders, Box 276A, 
Alburg VT 05440. BNB997 

FOR SALE: Clegg Mark 3 2m FM r working 
but NMH $75. Klaus Spies POB 48185, 
Niles IL 60648-01 85. BNB998 




THE 

GREAT 

MOBILE 

PEAR 





THE 

TEXAS 
BUGCATCHER 

HF Mobile Antenna System 

* Hi Q air-wound coils 

* Minimum SWiR — excellent perfor- 
mance on alJ HF bands 

* Easy assembly to meet almost any 
configuration 

* Fits standard 3/8-24 SAE mounts 

* Various length base masts & whips 
available 



Henry Allen WB5TYD 
214-388-4724 & am-4 pm weekdays 
903-527-41 63 evenings & weekends 

Send for free brochure! 



GLA Systems 

PO Box 425 

Caddo Mills, TX 75135 



©M 



NEW! 

146/220/446 MHz 
MOBILE TRIBANDER! 

The first VHF/UHF 
Tri bander with gab! 

GAIN: 146 MHz 2.15dB 
222 MHz 3.2dfi 
446MHzS5dB 

Designed for use with 
the Kenwood TM-741A 
and Icom IC-901 A 

Triplever also 
available! 



A 



CX-224 



NOW YOU CAN 
AFFORD THE BESTI 

Engineered for the Ham. the finest In Crank-Up 
Free-Standing or Guyed Towers Is from Tri-Ex. For 
over 30 years, the INDUSTRY standard-backed with 
Defense and Aerospace technology. 



MW SERIES 

Self-supporting when 
attached et first section - 
will hold normal Tri- Band 
beam; 25", 33", 50', and 
65' heights. 

W SERIES 

Aerodynamic 

tower designed 

to hold 9 sq. ft in 

a 50 MPH wind at 36 1 and 

51 * 

heights. 67" tower rated 

for 6 sq. ft. 



LM SERIES 

*W" brace motorized 
tower. Holds large 
antenna loads. Models at 
37\ 54\ and 70" heights, 

TM SERIES 

Tubular construction for 
larger antenna loads at 
70, 90" and 1 (XT heights. 
Free standing, with 
motorized operation. 




TO ORDER CALL 

800-328-2393 

TECH SUPPORT 
209-651-7659 

FAX* 209-651*5157 




TOWER CORPORATION 



7182 Rasmussan Ave, 
V»aiia,CA 93291 



Quality Structures since 1954 



CIRCLE 124 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 22 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1992 83 




Number 29 on your Feedback card 



ANDOM OUTPUT 

David CassidyNlGPH 



No Code— One Year Later 

As I write this, we have just passed 
the first anniversary of the code less 
Technician class license. We've had a 
full year to take a good, hard look at this 
controversial (to some) rule change. 
From everything I've heard and seen, I 
think we can declare the no-code li- 
cense an overwhelming success- No 
matter how hard a small but vocal mi- 
nority tries to put it down (still!), the 
dropping ot the code requirement for 
VHF and above licenses has had noth- 
ing but positive influence on amateur 
radio. 

And yet, that small minority of fuddy- 
duddies still can't get it through their 
crusty craniums that the future of ama- 
teur radio has nothing to do with this 
particularly outdated mode of commu- 
nications. 

Just last week, I got into yet another 
drawn-out conversation with a middle- 
aged ham who was predicting the 
downfaH of amateur radio (not that all 
hams who oppose the no-code license 
are middle-aged— some of them are 
really old). He used all of those "intelli- 
gent" arguments that we've ail heard a 
thousand times: The bands will be full 
of unqualified riff-raff (unlike the quali- 
fied riff-raff we now find ourselves 
stocked with). The ham bands will be 
full of all them good-buddy CBers (with- 
out exception, every former CBer I've 
ever met — on the air or in person — has 
been a credit to this hobby). It's dan- 
gerous to let unqualified (there's that 
word again} people muck around with 
potentially dangerous electronic 
equipment (IVe yet to hear a good an- 
swer when I ask how a knowledge of 
Morse code makes someone qualified 
to work on electronic circuits). Two me- 
ters will be filled to the brim with these 
codeless Techs (I sure wish that were 
true, but alas, 2 meters seems to be 
just as barren of activity in most of the 
country as before). \ had to learn the 
code, so everyone else should, too 
{this comment doesn't even deserve a 
reply). Morse code is an amateur radio 
tradition that should be maintained 
{sure, just like spark gaps, tubes and 2 
meter AM}. 

Not content at letting the technologi- 
cal advances of the last 30 years shoot 
by them, these curmudgeons have ac- 
tually pestered the FCC with numerous 
requests to either amend or reverse 
the no-code ruling. If they couldn't get 
the no-code Techs thrown out, they at 
least want to saddle them with a dis- 
tinctive calisign, I imagine that this is so 
they can identify and avoid talking with 
no-code Techs (no great loss for the 
Techs}. Gee, I wonder what the opinion 
of the FCC was of having to spend the 
time and resources to deal with these 
complaints and petitions? I wonder if 
the actions of these crybabies did any- 
thing to improve the FCC's already low 
opinion of amateur radio operators? 

Allow me to share with you a few of 
my observations of the effect of the 
codeless Technician license. I have 
met hundreds of these newly licensed 



hams over the past year. I've talked to 
them on the air. I've met them face-lo- 
face at ham tests. I've received their 
letters and phone calls. 

1 . I've noticed that there are a lot of 
younger faces entering amateur radio 
via the codeless Technician class li- 
cense. 

2. I've noticed a lot more women with 
newly acquired call signs. 

3. I've seen auditoriums from Florida 
to California packed with youngsters at 
Youth Forums. 

4. Every new Technician Tve met — ev- 
ery single one — has told me that they 
are currently studying the code so they 
can get on HR 

5. I've received letters from amateur 
radio clubs across the country who 
can't get their license classes going 
fast and frequently enough to satisfy 
the demand — and that includes code 
classes and upgrade classes, 

6. I've seen attendance records made 
at almost every hamfest I've attended 
this year. 

7. I've seen the amateur radio busi- 
ness community increase sales during 
the worst recession since the 1930s, 

So, would somebody kindly explain 
to me what the problem is? 

One other benefit I've noticed is that 
there is a lot more "elmering" going on 
these days. I hear experienced hams 
kindly counseling a frightened new- 
comer on proper repeater procedures. 
I've heard people offering their help to 
newcomers on every repeater I've 
checked into, Help with antennas. . ] 
loans and repair of old gear. . rules 
clarification , .invitations to club 
meetings. All over the country, I've 
heard experienced hams reach out to 
these newcomers with understanding 
end patience. They have obviously 
found out something that has always 
been true— you get an incredible 
amount of personal satisfaction from 
helping newcomers. 

To be sure, I've also heard newcom- 
ers chased off of repeaters. I've re* 
oeived letters from clubs that voted to 
keep out codeless Techs (gee, I wish I 
could hang out with those guys). I've 
seen hams who wouldn't know a tran- 
sistor from a tuna sandwich telling 
electrical engineers and computer pro- 
grammers that they aren't qualified to 
be hams because they didn't pass a 
code test I've even seen anti-Techni- 
cian writings in amateur publications 
(though none that are important 
enough to make any difference). 
Thankfully, these types of episodes 
have been few. 

If there has been a negative side to 
the codeless Technician license, I've 
yet to see it. Thousands of enthusiastic 
and motivated newcomers are good for 
any hobby— ©specialty a hobby that is 
currently searching for new justifica- 
tions for its existence. 

As lor those few who continue to 
complain about the passing of Morse 
code — don't fret It's only a matter of 
time before we are picking over their 
stations at a local flea market and see 
them listed as Silent Keys. 




Number 30 on you r Feedback card 



ROPAGATION 



Jim Gray W1XU 
P.O. Box 1079 
PaysonAZ 85541 

Conditions this month are expected 
to be fairly quiet on the HF bands . * . 
with little magnetic field disturbance, 
reflected by generally low "A" indexes 
and solar flux indexes, The 10 cm flux 
is likely to be below the March and April 
values, and DX conditions wilt there- 
fore not be quite as good as during the 
spring months. 

You can expect generally Good con- 
ditions, however, with consider- 
able DX activity on 1 and 1 2 me- 
ters, peaking in the afternoon, 
and usually favoring transequa- 
to rial paths. Short skip will also 
abound between 500 and 1 ,000 
miles or so. On 15, 17, and 20 
meters, worldwide OX should be 
available most days between 
dawn and sunset, again peaking 
in the afternoon. Short skip out to 
about 2,000 miles will prevail on 
most days. 

On 30 and 40 meter bands, DX 
should be good during hours of 
darkness until after dawn. Short 
skip to 1,000 mites during the 
day, and to 2,000 miles at night 
should be workable on most days 
and nights, 

On 60 meters, DX to various 
parts of the world should be 
workable on some days of the 
month— particularly during 
nighttime and early morning 
hours— when the bands are quiet 
and noise levels are tow. Daytime 
short skip will also be available, 
but late spring and early summer 
conditions on BO meters during 
the day are not generally consid- 
ered to be particularly favor- 
able—often due to thunderstorm 
activity and high levels of static. 

The sunspot cycle continues 
its inevitable slow decline this 
year, and soon we shall begin to 
notice dropout of the higher HF 
bands and lack of quality "solid" 
signals on many days of the 
month. WWV continues to be 
your best source Of current infor- 



Jim Gray W1XU 

mation each day, so check at 18 min- 
utes after any hour for the readings of 
"A'T'B" magnetic field indexes and 
Solar Flux Index. Also, keep a sharp 
lookout for SID (Sudden Ionospheric 
Disturbance) reports this month via 
WWV. 

VHF activity on 6 meters and above 
can be very good this month, so check 
the 6 and 2 meter bands frequently for 
"tropo" and sporadic E-layer activity. 

Consult the accompanying charts 
for a preview of likely Good and Fair 
conditions on the HF bands. 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


GMT: 


■DO 02 0-1 06 09 10 12 14 16 IB 20 22 


ALASKA 


10 


20 


20 
20 


40 


40 


_ 


20 


20 


__ 


— 


15 


m fn 


ARGENTINA 


15 


MM 


_ 


10 


— 





"Via 


'"In 


AUSTRALIA 


"-'/•i 




20 


20 


40 


■*! 


20 


— 


— 


— 


10 /u 


CANAL ZONE 


lb 


■■-/,(. 


"fco 


15 


15 


10 


10 


to 


20 


10 


ENGLAND 


20 


40 


mm 


"fro 


40 


— 


— 


15 


10 


15 


15 


20 


HAWAII 


"fa 


IS 


20 


20 


»;« 


"fro 


20 


20 


— 


— 




tyq 


INDIA 


20 


20 


„_ 


_ 


■^ 


- 


— 


15 


— 


— 






JAPAN 


10 


_ 


20 


— 


— 


— 


SO 


20 


— 


— 


15 


l <Vis 


MEXICO 


15 


Bfeafo 


htahta 


15 


15 


10 


10 


10 


20 


10 


PHILIPPINES 


IS 




20 20 


— 


— 


20 


Jgg 


10 




20 


15 
10 


PUERTO RICO 


15 


z*f*} 


"»fr rtfo "ftc 


*$ 


IS 


10 


to 


10 


SOUTH AFRICA 


*/« 40 


20 


20 


__ 






_^ 


10 


10 


15 


15 


U-S.S.R. 


40 


*Vua 20 


20 
40 


__ 


__ 


__ 


,0 A.S 


1# /lS 


__ 


20 


20 


WEST COAST 


»t« W/4D 


«V4D 


,40 


— 


— 


2ffCSE?fflEJ 



CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: 



ALASKA 


"Vis 


15 


20 


20 


20 




n 
20 


20 




^^ 


— m 


w* 


ARGENTINA 


15 


15 


»/«»/« 


20 


_ 


__ 


10 


__ 


__ 


to 


o/,. 


AUSTHALIA 


•vJis 


15 





20 


™/<a 


40 


n 
2C 







15 l " 


.0 


CANAL ZONE 


lS fJ' 5 /3I 


40" - 


so fm 


^_ 


— 


*fr 


"Vm 


10 


10 


10 


ENGLAND 


40'" 


4k 


" T "" 


_ 


_ 


15' 


15* 


20 


20 


HAWAII 


15 


15 


15 


20 


20 


'•■V« 


4U 


20 


— 


10 


10 


10 


INDIA 


\^ 


<$» 










_. 


20 ■'■ 


20' '' 


ts" 


__ 


_ 




JAPAN 


'",',* 


15 


M 


CO 


20 


t_ 


_ 


_ 


—, 


,l Vl5 


MEXICO 


"/ja 


1s /» 


"/» 


*>/* w/« 


_ 


• — 


1 °fco 


"Y,v 


10 


10 


10 


PHILIPPINES 


% 





Art. 1 " 1 
20 


20 ' 







«■ 




-'■L 


-If,, 


— 


__ 


PUERTO RlCO 


'Vw 


■V» 


tofa 


nfm 


"to 


— 


~— 


■<Vm 


lOfatl 


10 


10 


10 


SOUTH AFRICA 


— 


— 


20 


20 






- — 


— 


15 


15 


•*i» 


20 


U.S.S.H. 
















15" : 


15" 


H* 


,20 


20 



WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


•Vrttaftl 


15 


20 


2D 


20 





20 


20 


^» 


_ 


lb 


ARGENTINA 


«^J 


15 


15 


20 


20 
















10 


10 


AUSTRALIA 


to 


,D /i* 


15 


15 


20 


20 


2D 





20 










CANAL 20NE 


10 


15 


!*/« 


wfa, 


■& 


i* 


— 


— 


10 


10 


10 


10 


ENGLAND 


20 


20 














15 


IS 


^a 


20 


HAWAII 


"Vis 


fyil 


15 


"tea 


"frtl 


**J« 


40 


— . 


15 


10 


— 


INDIA 





15 m 


20 














— 


'■*j» 


1b : - 


v- 


— ■ 


JAPAN 


'tyu 


™tt* 


15 


20 


20 


20 


— 


— 


20 


— 


— — 


15 


MEXICO 


10 


15 


"W 


w/*e 


^ftc 


M 








10 


to 


10 


10 


PHILIPPINES 


10 


to 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 


15 


iVa 


— 


— 


PUERTO RICO 


10 


t5 


is/** 


*>l* 


■ftp 


ra 


— 


— 


10 


10 


10 


10 


SOUTH AFRICA 


20 


20 





20 














— 


ID 


15 


15 


U.S.S.fl. 


20 


— 


— 


— 


zo m 


— 


— 


20" 


20" 1 


2D 


20 


20 


EAST COAST 


tajj 


»/« 


»/« 


40 


40 


— 1 — 


Whs 


WJiS 


'fl/i& 


^Ae, 


20 



' Try r,*Ml hKjtrrir hanrinn 'Ci''d»js ^Prcs£>4R'0|iflning4]ntfit5Eijmdan"Ci' rtay3. |f)TryS0m. 
Pl0W^UMrt&*!()11W15h*1Zm;MrWJ7nd.'WHjrMni Mow B" TTm chart mtms ta th» MiIhisI 

bond possiUa al ttv lima TdcBtH]. I no Ilk*. Irf ncul hwer band. 



MAY 1992 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FR1 SAT 












1 

F-G 


2 

G 


3 

G 


4 

G 


5 

G 


6 

G 


7 

G-F 


8 

F 


9 

F-G 


10 

G 


11 

G-F 


12 

F 


13 

F-G 


14 

G-F 


15 

F 


16 

F-G 


17 

G 


18 

G 


19 

G 


20 

G 


21 

G 


22 

G 


23 

G 


24 g 


25 

G 


26 


27 


28 

G-F 


29 

F 


30 

F 


31f-p 



84 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 



ICOM BATTERY INSERTS 



BP-3 
BP-5 
BP-7 
BP-8 



8.4v 
10. 8 v 
13.2v 

B.4v 



270mah 
500mah 
500mah 
SOOmah 



$15.00 
$21.00 
$23.00 
$21.00 



KENWOOD BATTERY INSERTS 



PB-21 
PB-21H 
PB24Tabs 
PB-25^26 



7.2v 
7.2v 
9-6v 
84v 



2Q0mah 
600mah 
600mah 
500 m ah 



YAESU BATTERY INSERTS 



FNB-4/4A 

FNB-10 

FNB-17 



12v 
7.2v 
7.2v 



SOOmah 
600mah 
600mah 



$12.00 
$15,00 
$15 00 

$iaoo 



$27.50 
$15.00 
$18.00 



MORE BATTERY INSERTS 



Tempo S2/4/5 Late 


5Q0rnah 


$21.00 


San-Tec #142n 44 Tabs 


BOOmah 


$22.00 


Azden 300 Tabs 


BOOmah 


$15.00 


Bearcat 


6G0mah 


$20.00 


Regency MT1000 Tabs 


600mah 


SI 5.00 



YAESU COMPLETE PACKS 



FNB-2 

FNB10 

FNB11 

FNB12 

FNB12S 

FNB14 

FNB-14S 

FNB-17 



10.8v 

7.2v 

12.0v 

12.0v 

12.0v 

7.2v 

7 + 2v 

7,2v 



SOOmah 
6G0rnah 
600mah 
SOOmah 
600mah 
lOOOmah 
1400 m ah 
600mah 



ICOM PACKS 2/4 SAT + 24AT 



BP-83S 

BP-84 

BP-85S 



7.2v 

7.2v 

12v 



750mah 

tOOOmah 

SOOmah 



$19.00 
$34.00 
$52.00 
$45.00 
$48.00 
$48.00 
$59.00 
$35.00 



$38,00 
$50.00 
$60.00 



'Add $3,00 Shipping FREE Catalogue 

VISA MasterCard 



TNR The Battery Store 

279 Douglas Ave., Suite 1112 

Altamonte Springs, FL 32714 

1-800-346-0601 



CIRCLE 62 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Townsend Electronics 



RIG 
SAVER 



* Allows you to 
safely mount 
your hand-held 
or mobile radio 
where you can 
see the controls, 

* Vinyl coated adapter^ 
plate protects your 
radio. 

* SlimLine $24.95. 
Heavy Duty $29 J5 
+ $3.00 S & H. 

* Adaptable to nearly 
any vehicle or 
station use. 

* Mounts on ANY 
single flat surface. 



P.O. BOX 415 
Pterceton, IN 46562 




CIRCLE 299 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Why buy a TNC? 
PC HF FAX + PC SWL S 1 19 



SPECIAL COMBINATION OFFER 



For a limited time, if you order PC HF FAX $99 (see our 
other ad in this issue), you can add PC SWL for only $20 
instead of our regular low price of $99.00, 

PC SWL contains the hardware, software, instructions 
and frequency lists needed to allow you to receive a vast 
variety of digital broadcasts transmitted over shortwave 
radio. AH you need is any IBM PC or compatible computer 
and an 3$B shortwave receiver- The product consists of: 
Demodulator 

Digital Signal Processing Software 
BO Page Tutorial Reference Manual 
World Press Frequency Lfst 
Tutorial Audio Cassette with Samples 
PC SWL automatically decodes Morse code, Radio 
Teletype, FEC (forward error correcting code), SELCAL 
(selective calling transmissions), and NAVTEX. 

PC SWL lets you tune in on world press services with 
up to the minute news, meteorological broadcasts, ham 
radio operators, coastal shore stations, aviation tetex and 
much more digital action on the shortwave bands, Find all 
the utility station action you have been missing. PC SWL 
software uses the processor in your PC to do the work, why 
pay for another expensive box when a simple interface and 
your PC and do the job? 
ADVANCED FEATURES; 
Tuning Oscilloscope 
Digital Waveform Presentations 
Auto Calibration and Code Recognition 
Continuously Tunable Filter Frequencies 
Variable Shift 

Adjustable CW Filter Sensitivity 
Unattended Capture and Printing 



Software Systems Consulting 

61 5 S. El Camino Real. San Clemente. CA 92672 
Tel: (7 14)498-5784 Fax:(714)498-0568 



COMMODORE/ AMIGA 

C^ ! ™ | REPLACEMENT CHI?S r PARTS, UPGRADES ] £&£& 



COMMODORE 



«■■ ■ ■ i i j 



■ ■ ■ ■**■*■ 



***•■■■ 



t -r - r r T 



CIRCLE 244 ON REARER SERVICE CARD 



Sell YOUR used gear 

in 7S Classifieds. . . 

Call Sue Colbert. 



6502 .w..... 

662dA ....... 

PLA/906114 

6567 VIC ... +1 

6581 SID , 

All 901/225-226-227-229 ROMs 

651G/850QCPU. * 

C64 Keyboard (new) ..... 

Computer Saver II/C64 protection system for 
spikes & power supply overload 

NEW C64 Repairable Power Supply 1 Higher 
amperage {1,8) runs cool (1 year warranty) — 
(4 r 3 amp version for C64 includes Commodore 
Diagnostician. Perfect for packet.) . . , , 

AMIGA 

8520A CIA (Most problematic chip) ............. 

1.3 Kickstart ROM 

8372A 1 Meg Agnus. Inc. "Final Test" diagnostic 

diskette/RockweH chip puller ..,,... 

S3 73 Super Denise (Enhanced Chip Set) 

8362 Denise ....... .. I 

8364 Paula .,.,.. , , , .... . , , ... , , 

57 19 Gary ■. ...... 

1 X 4/80 SC ZIP (A3000) 

A50G PC Motherboard (populated and tested) 

A20QQ PC Motherboard (new) with G372Afl.3ROM/8373 . . 
MegaChip 200W2Meg. Agnus/Rockwell chip puller/ 

"Final Test" diagnostic diskette 

A500 200 watt Brg Foot Umversa I Switch ing Pwr Sup Jim . 

Amiga A5O0 keyboard (new, exact replacement) 

Switch -Ht electronic Rom selector switch 

complete compatibility with all software 

McCoy PLCC Agnus chip puller sold as Burndy by CBM 

for S29. Our Price 



THE GRAPEVINE GROUP, INC. 
3 Chestnut Street. Suffers NV 10901 



. 2.95 
. 9,95 
. 3.95 
. 9.95 
. 9,95 
.9.95 
_ 9.95 
19.95 

17,95 

24.95 

37,95 



11.95 
27.95 

55.95 
42.95 
23.95 
23.95 
12.95 
21.95 
189.95 
529.95 

299.99 
83.95 

. 59,95 



$44.50 
$14.95 




ORDER LINE 1-800-292 7445 W£ 

CUSTOM SERVICE: 9 14-368*4242 



914057-2424 
We Ship Worldwide 



Hour s: 9-6 EST M-F Fax: 9 1 4-3 57 -6243 

Prices Subject to Change 



CIRCLE 192 ON READER SERVICE CARD 





□ CYBERSCAN function allows scan file tracking control of 
systems employing frequency hopping techniques. 

Q Spectrum log at speeds in excess of 1300 channeis/min. 
while automatically generating a histogram of activity. 

□ Birdie log during frequency search automatically 
characterizes your R7000, then locks out those frequencies. 

Q Automatic detection and storage of active frequencies during 
search and spectrum log operations. 



DELTACOMM DSS (Digital Signal Strength) upgrade for the DELTACOMM I-7000 communication manager. 



□ Innovative interface design allows digitizing and storing the R7000 signal level information with 8-bit 
accurary via your computer's game port. 

G DSS allows user programmable upper and tower signal level detection limits during DELTACOMM l-7000's 
spectrum log function. 

Q Log signal strength information to printer or disk file while DELTACOMM 1-7000 is scanning, 

DELTACOMM 1-7000 communication manager program includes ail cabling, manual, UL listed 
power supply and Delta Research custom interface for $299.00 +■ $a.00 {U,SJ or $25.00 (forei on) 
3&H. The DELTACOMM DSS interface upgrade comes complete with easy to follow NO SOLDER 
installation instructions, all cabling and 8-bit DSS A/D converter module for $99.00 + $8.00 (U.S.) 
or $25.00 (foreign) S&H and is available as an upgrade option to registered 1-7000 users. 



•7!** 



z&i 



Halter Card 



00».'> * ITl' 



■rtwss 



Bf*?;g;36*ll||:Wati^ 



CIRCLE 257 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1992 85 



m© 



REFERENCE 




2ONL0I Everyday Electronics Data Book fry Mike TmUey HI. Inti- 
mation is presented in the form of a basic electronic recipe book with numer- 
ous examples showing how theory can be put into practice "sing a range of 
comrnonly available Industry standard 1 components and devices. 256pp. 134 
line drawings. $18,00 

20NIO2 Practical Digital Electronics Handbook by Mike Tooley con- 
tains nine digital test gear projects, CMOS, and TTL pinouis and tables or 

reference data, Introduces digital circuits, logic gates, bistables and timers, 
microprocessors, memory and input/output devices, before looking at the 
RS-232C interface and the 1EEE-4S8 and IEEE- IflQO microprocessors buses. 
208 pp., 100 line drawings. S14.S0 

20N 103 Electro flic Power Supply Handbook by Ian R. Sinclair covers 

many types of supplies— batteries, simple AC supplies, switch mode supplies 
and inverters. All types. of supplies used for electronics purposes are covered 
in derail, .starting with cells and batteries and extending by way of rectified 
supplies and linear stabilizers to modem switch - mode systems, TC switch • 
mode regulators, DC-DC converters and inverters. 144 pp., 90 line draw- 
ings. $16.25 

2ON104 Electronic Test Equipment Handbook by Stwt Mmey is a 

guide to electronic test equipment far the engineer, technician, student and 
home enthusiast. Provides a practical guide to widely used electronics instru- 
ments and the techniques of measuring a wide range of parameters in electron- 
ics systems. 216 pp.. 123 line drawings. JJ&.00 

20N 105 Digital Logic Gates and Rip-flops by Ian R. Sinclair, what they 
do and how to use ihem. Seeks to establish a firm foundation in digital 
electronics by treating the topics of gates and flip-flops thoroughly and from 
[he beginning. For the user who wants to design and troublcshoot digital 
circuitry with considerably more understanding of principles than the con- 
structor , and who wants to know more than a few rules of thumb about digital 
circuits- 2(Hpp, 1(58 line drawings, $18,00 

02C30 The Commodore Ham's Companion by Jim Grubbs K9EI 160 
pages of useful information on selecting a Cflnrnvonwe computer for the ham 
shack , where to find specialized programs, the Commodore-packet connec- 
tion, and more! $9.50 

G9TJ22 The World Ham Net Directory by Mike Witkomki New— second 
edition now over 600 net listings. This book introduces the special interest 
ham radio networks and shows you when and where you can tune them in. 
$9.50 





I0F091 !992 International Callback The new 1992 International Call 

book lists 500,000 licensed radio amateurs in the countries outside North 
America. It covers South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific area 
(exclusive of Hawaii and the U.S. possessions). $29.95 

I0D091 1992 North American Callbook The 1 992 North American Call - 
book lists the calls, names, and address, information for over 5(10,000 licensed 
radio amateurs m all countries of North America, from Panama to Canada 
including Greenland, Bermuda, and the Caribbean islands plus Hawaii and II , S . 
possessions. $19*95 

06H24 Radio Handbook, 23rd Ed. by mium L Orr W6SAI 840 pagesof 
everything you wanted to know about radio communication. Indcpih study of 
AC/DC fundamentals, SSB, antennas, amplifiers, power supplies, and mure, 
$2*3.51) hard cover only 

PE76 Basic Electronics Prepared by the Bureau of Naval Personnel 



Thoroughly revised in 1972. Covers the important aspects of applied elec- 
tronics and electronics communications. 567 pp. $10*95 

I2E4I Second Level Basic Electronics Prepared by the Bureau of 
Naval Personnel Sequel to Basic Electronics, thorough treatment of the more 
advanced levels of applied electronics. Includes microwave receiving and 

transmitting. Hundreds of excel lent diagrams. 325 pp. $7 .50 

01 [M5 The Illustrated Dictionary at Electronics, 5th Ed. by Rufus P. 
Turner and Stan Gibilisco Featuring more than 27,000 entries, an exhaustive 
list of abbreviations, and appendices packed with schematic symbols and 
conversion tables, this is by far the most comprehensive dictionary of practi- 
cal electronics and computer terms available. 720 pages $26.95 

04M54 GGTE Morse Tutor From beginner to Extra das* in easy self-paced 
lessons. Code speeds from I to over 100 words per minute. Standard or 
Farns worth mode. Adjustable tone frequency. Create your own drills, prac- 
tice or actual exams. Exams conform to FCC requirements. 5 W floppy for 
IBM PC, XT, AT, PS/2 or compatibles $i».5» 

tefiftf Advanced Edition $29.95 

2ON091 Most-Often-Needed Radio Diagrams and Servicing 
Information, 1926-1930, Volume One compiled b yM.N. Beifman 
An invaluable reference for anyone involved in Vintage Radio restoration. 
Hundreds of schematics, writing diagrams and parts lists, all from the original 
sources. $11.95 

20N096 How To Read Schematics (4th edition} by Donald E. 
Hemnglon Written ibr the beginner in electronics, but it also contains infor- 
mation valuable to the hobbyist and engineering technician. This hoot is yciur 
key to unlocking the mysteries of schematics, beginning with a general 
discussion of electronic diagrams. $14*95 

20N097 Radio Operators World Atlas by WaltStinson, WtCP 
This is a compact {5x7}, detailed, and comprehensive world atlas designed as 
a constant desk top companion for radio operators, and as a replacement for 
the traditional bulky and outdated atlases. Also included are 42 pages of vital 
statistics aboul each country. Popular with DXers worldwide. $ 17,95 

2QNG20 Secrets of RF Circuit Design by Joseph J. Cart Written in clear 
non-technical language, covers everything from antennas to transistors. You 
will leant the basics of receiver operation, the proper use and repair of 
components in RE circuits, the principles of radio .signal propagation from 
low frequencies to microwave, and much motel $19,511 



SHORTWA VE 



06557 1992 Passport to World Band Radio by Inter- 
national Broadcasting Services, Ltd. You can have the 
world at your fingertips. You'll get the latest station and 
time grids, the 1992 Buyer's Guide and more. 384 pages. 

03SI I Shortwave Receivers Past and Present edit- 
ed by Fred J. Oitermart Concise guide to 200 f shortwave 

receivers manufactured in the last 20 years. Gives key 
information on each model including coverage, display 1 
circuit type, performance, new value, used value, etc. 
Photos on most models. The Bine Book of shortwave radio 
value. 1987, ILtt pages, 8tt x 11 . $8.95 

07R25 The RTTY Listener Ay FredOsserman New and 
expanded version. This specialized hook compiles issues 1 
through 25 of the RTIY Listener Newsletter. It contains 
up-to-date, hard-lo-find information on advanced RTTY 
and FAX monitoring techniques and frequencies. 224 
pages. $19.95 

03C09 Shortwave Clandestine Confidential by Ger- 
ry 1„ Dexter Covers all clandestine broadcasting, country 
by country: tells frequencies, other unpublished informs 
tk>n: spy, insurgents, freedom fighters, rebel, anarchist 
radio, secret radio. Current publication. 84 pages. $8,50 

03M221 US Military Communications {Port 1 ) Deals 
with US Military communication channels on shortwave. 
Covers frequencies, background on point to point fre- 
quencies for the Philippines, Japan and Korea. Indian and 
Pacific Oceans, and more. 102 pages. $12.95 

03M222 US Military Communications (Part 2) Cov- 
ers US Coastguard, NASA, CAP, FAA, Dept of Energy, 
FedeTal Emergency Management Agency, Disaster Com- 
munications, FCC, Dept of Justice From 14 KC to 9073 
KC. 79 pages. $12.95 

03M223 US Military Communications (Part 3} This 

part completes the vast overall frequency list of US Mili- 
tary services, from 8993 KC Co 27,944 KC. 78 pages. 
$12.95 

09542 The Scanner Listener's Handbook by Ed- 
ward S&mtre N2BFF Get (he most out of your scanner 
radio. Covers getting started, scanners and receivers, an- 
tennas, coaxial cable, accessories, computer controlled 
monitoring, more. S 14.95 

035208 Radioteletype Press Broadcasts Ay Michael 
Sckaay Covers schedules of Press Services by time, fre- 

ANTENNAS = 



quency, and country broadcasting in English, French, 
German, Spanish, and Portuguese. Detailed Press Agency 
Portraits; 120 pp. $12.95 

E I T£g Tune in On Telephone Calls by Tom Kneitet 
K2AES Formatted as a frequency list with detailed de- 
scription of each service and its location in RF spectrum. 

PtoV ides basic information for casual J isteners getting start- 
ed and details for ardent enthusiasts. $12.95 

03K205 Guide to Radioteletype (HTTY) Stations by 
J, Kliagenfuas Updated book Covers all RTTY stations 
from 3MH2-3iOMHi. Press, Military, Commercial, 
Meteo, PIT'S, embassies, and more. 105 pp. $12*95 

1 1 AS 1 Air Scan Gu tde to Aeronaultca I Communl* 
cations (5th Edition) by Tom Kneitet KIAES Most 

comprehensive guide to monitoring aeronautical commu- 
nication in die US. Expanded to cover all Canadian land 
airports and seaplane bases, plus listings for Central 
America, the Caribbean, North Atlantic, and the Pacific 
Territories, $14.95 

07 A66 Aeronautical Communications Ha rtdbook by- 
Robert i\ Evans Exhaustive, scholarly treatment of short- 
wave aeronautical listening. Well organized, up-tonJale. 
266 pp. $19*95 

O7R20 A Radio Journal 1912-1940 by Russ Ren- 
rtaker W9CRC A fascinating trip through time. Easy to 
read and informative, educational and entertaining. A trip 
down memory lane to the early days of radio. $7.95 

LIRF13 The-' Top Secret" Registry of US Govern- 
merit Radio Frequencies (7th Ed.) by Tom Racket 
K2AES This scanner directory has become the standard 
reference source for frequency and other important infor- 
mation relating to the communications of federal agen- 
cies. 25 to 470 MH?. $19.95 

1 1F52 FarrelPs Confidential Frequency List com- 
plied by A*G> Haliigey All frequencies from AMHz- 

2%MHz covering ship, embassy, areo, Volmel, Interpol, 

numbers. Air Force QnefTwo. more 376 pp. St9 JO 

I ISR97 National Directory of Survival Radio Fre- 
quencies by Tom Kneitet K2AFS Handy and concise 
reference guide to high interest communication!; frequen- 
cies required by stirvivalists,. Includes chapter on building 
emergency communications antenna systems. $8.95 

I ISM 1 1 Scanner Modification Handbook, Vol. 1 by 
Bill Creek Provides straightforward step-by-step instruc- 



tions for expanding the operating capabilities of VHP' 
scanners. Filled with interesting text, helpful photos, ta- 
bles, and figures. $17,95 

I IEEG6 Guide to Embassy Espionage Communi- 
cations by Tom Kneitel K2AES Candid and probing 

examination of worldwide embassy and {alleged) espi- 
onage communication systems and networks Intensive 
nation-by- nation directory of embassy stations is includ- 
ed. $1(1.95 

I5D9I 1992 Shortwave Directory (7th ed.} by Bob 
Grove Extensively revised, the new 1992 Shortwave Di- 
rectory is the consummate PXer's bible for the first 30 
MHz of radio spectrum, including up-to-date and accurate 
VLF information as well- 270 information -packed and 
illustrated pages in convenient SH'xIJ format profession- 
ally bound. S21 + 95 

20N093 Vintage Radio 1BB7-1929 by Morgan E 
McMahon Recaptures the excitement of the early days. 
The authoritative reference book for historians and collec- 
tors SN.95 

20N094 A Flick of the Switch ; 1 930-1 950 by Morgan 
£„ McMahon Here's your chance to recapture the thrill of 
old-time radio and television. Browse through a thousand 
photos and fascinating old ads. Discover the fast -growing 
hobby of radio collecting, and perhaps find a treasure in 
your own attic or cellar. $8*95 

20N095 World Broadcast Station Address Booh by 
Gerry L, Dexter A must for the serious shortwave listener. 
Hundreds of addresses for shortwave broadcast stations. 
Special sections with helpful inform. 1 1 mm to increase your 
QSL percentage. $£.95 

07R26 World Wide Aeronautical Communications 
fry Robert F t Evans This 42 page hook was designed to 
update and augment the frequency lists, published in the 
Aeronautical Communications Handbook-HF Edition, 
Contents include Aircraft/Air Traffic Control, Aircraft/ 
Company Operations, Aviation Weather Broadcasts, 
Aeronautical Flight Tests, Worldwide Military Air 
Forces, Aero Search & Rescue-, Aero Law Enforcement, 
NASA Flight Support, Aero Terms & Abbreviations and 
Aero Tactical Identifiers. $6$5 
I ITB9 Scanner Modification Handbook Vol. 2 by 
Bill Creek Here it is— a companion to Vol, 1 . In facl T Vol. 
2 has a section that provides improved approaches and 
updated techniques for the mods in Vol. 1. UTere's 18 
new, exciting modifications; for popular scanners and is 



fully illustrated with photos and schematics, highly de* 

tailed step-by-step instructions so that the average hob- 
byist can do these performance enhancing modifica- 
tions. This is an all new book that has all new mods. 
$17.95 

03R0I World Press Services Frequencies 
(RTTY) New 5th edition. A comprehensive manual 

covering radlotelcrypc news monitoring— contains all 
information— antenna, receiving, terminal anils, plus 
three extensive frequency lists. Covers 65 Worid Press 
Services breadcasting in English. LL The Original Press 
Book. 11 M pp. ,$8,95 



VIS Study Cards Advance the easy way with 
VIS Study Cards, Compact, Up-to-date Flash 
Cards with Key Words, Underlined, Quiz on back. 
Formulas worked out. Schematics at your finger- 
lips. Used SUCCESSFULLY by ages 6 to SI! 
NOVICE VI&OI SI 1.95 

TECH V1S02 

GENERAL VJS03 

ADVANCED VTSW 

EXTRA VIS05 



10,95 

9.95 

15.95 

14.95 



Lanze Code Programs— (Available on 5H " 

disk.) Inexpensive complete study guide code pro- 
grams for both the C64/ 1 2fi Commodores and the 
I ISM compatibles. Programs include updated FCC 
questions, multiple choice answers, formulas, 
schematic symbols, diagrams, and simulated (VE) 
sample test. 



1BMI 


>knj Gu 


iraalure Parrf 


Price 


Nnviee 


IfiMtil 


OOMOl 


%UM 


Tech 


mm 


COM02 


MM 


General 


IBMB 


COMTjJ 


$14,95 


Advmutf 


KMD4 


CQMM 


SI99S 


Ertja(NwftMl) 


IBMOS 


COM05 


SR95 



1BMU6, COMG6 IBM/Commodore Tech No 
Code— Lanze Code Program contains all (he 
authorized FCC questions ami answers used in 
testing fi>rniubiK t schematic symbols, diagrams, 
and sample test for passing the new Technician 
No Code license. $34.95 

IBM 97 Amateur Radio Part 97 Rules (in- 
cludes updated, revised Commission's Rules, Sep- 
tember 30. 1989) 5 ft " disk IBM compatible only. 
$9.95 



05A95 * Easy tip Antennas for Radio Listeners 
and Hama by Edward M. Noll Like to learn how lo 
construct low-cost, ea^y-to-erect antennas? Easy-up An- 
tennas will help you. $16.50 

10A345 • Beam Antenna Handbook by William Qrr 
W6SAI/Stetirt Cowan W2LX Yagi beam theory , con- 
struction, operation. Wire beams. SWR curves. Matching 
systems. A "must 1 " for serious DXens. Sit .95 

10A343 * AM About Cubital Quad Antennas ftv 
William Orr W6SA1/Stuurt Cowan W2LXT\k "Classic" 
on Quad design, theory, construction, operation. New 

feed and matching systems. New data. $9.30 



H)A346 • Simple, Low-cost Wire Antennas 

for Radio Amateurs by William Orr W6SA1/ Stuart 
Cowan W2LX All New! Low cost, multi-hand 
antennas; inexpensive beams. ' invisible' h antennas 
for hams in l "tough" locations! New data. $11.50 

{J L A70 * Practical Antenna Handbook by Joseph J+ 
Cfl/r Design, build, modify, and install your own anten- 
nas. Carr, a 20-year veteran of technical writ- 
ing, has a unique ability to present complex techni- 
cal concepts, in an casy-to- understand way. 416 pp. 
$21.53 



UHF/VHF/PACKET 



10A347 All About VHF Amateur Radio by William 
Orr W6SAI DX propagation, VHF yagi and quad beams, 
repealers and how they work h OSCAR satellites and how 
to use them. $11.95 

09V 1 1 The Basic Guide to VHRUH F Hun Radio by 
Edward M. Noll This book provides a first rate introduc- 
tion to life on the 2,6 and 1 .25 meter bands as well as 23, 
33, and 70cm. $6.50 

01P22 The Packet Radio Handbook by Jonathan L 
Mayo KR2T" . . .an excellent piece of work. Well worth 
reading lor both the experienced and the new packe- 



teer. . .the definitive guide to amateur packet opera- 
tion." -Gwyn Reedy Wi BEL Only $15-00 

20N0I9 U.S. Repeater Hap booh by William 
Smith, N6MQS TTie Guide for traveling radio ama- 
teurs gives you repealer frequencies, and locations on 
easy to read state map. Includes all 54 states, and 28- 
1200 MHz. $9,95. 

03R02 RTTY Today by Dave Ingram K4TWJ Only 
up-to-date RTTY hook in existence. Covers alt facets of 
RTTY. Most comprehensive RTTY guide e*er pub- 
lished. Fully illustrated. 1 12 pages. $8.50 



ARRL BOOKS 



AA1991 ARRL 1992 Handbook (68th ed.) 39 
chapters, featuring 2.1H0 lahjes. figures and duns. 
The most comprehensive, i*e [| organized and afford- 
able source of amateur radio reference material. 1132 
pages E5-*> 

ARlOSo ARRL Operating Manual Packed win in- 
formation am how to rrulc the best use of your surma, 
iFK'luJift^ ilMcrficing home computers, OSCAR, 
VftF-UHF. contesting WM 




AfMM w Antenna Compendium Vol. 1 

on verticals, quads, loops. >agis. reduced uh 

nav Sjluiiv Smub f Turn, immnj notarization, and 

other interesting subfect* 1 10.00 

AR2545 Antenna Compendium Vol. 2 42 paper* 
covering vertical*, jtagis. quads, mullihand and broad 
band system*, antenna acted ion. md much more. 
SUM 

ARlhX* Companion Soft ware for Antenna Com- 
pendium Vol. 251/4 H MS-DOS floppy. $10.00 

AR04HH WtFB'i Antenna Notebook by Doug 
fkMaw WtFB Get [In; best performance out of unob- 
trusive wire antenna* unci verticals, Build tuners and 
SWK bridges. $8. W> 

ARO U« QRP Notebook fry Doug Deflicn W1F8 
Prrscnii construction project!* for the QRP operalor, 
from a simple I u>uil crystal controlled transmitter lu 
more complc* transceiver deigns. $0.50 

AR414I WlFB k i Detlgn Notebook At- tkwg 
DeAtaw WfFH This plain language booi is filled with 
simple practical pn^vi^ lhai can he hu ill using rradiiv- 
j\ jilihk components and common hand trots, % 10.40 

AR2200 Antenna Impedance Hatching frp HI- 
frrd S. Carom Mod comprehensive boot written on 
using Smith Cham in joking impedance matching 
proWerm $15,00 

ARM02 Solid Sute Oeslgn Owe* ruil of good, 
basic informal ion , cineui designs and applications; dr- 
set options of rccrrvrriH, transmdlers. power siappha* 
■n lest ennanncnt $12-00 

ARJ290 Companion Software for Weather 
Satellite Handoook 5 i M3 l « is Raja*, SiG.oo 

AR3193 Weather Satellite Handbook (4th ext) 
n> fit-. An/pa ittfuart WBHtXJT Hoi off ihe press' 
F-tpanded jiw! revised to reflect today's weather- f,u 
satellite technology &2<h00 



NEW STUFF 



AR3291 Now You're Talking!: Discover the 
World of Ham Radio Successor to the immerceH 
fvpiiSur fi/«f rrt ihf H'orfd t**rb /fan FLidity. Coven 
evcrvthiny vou need to too* to earn your first Amateur 
Radro license. More than a study guide, this hoot 
will help yam ickct nfuipmerj for your ham ratho 
station and etptam how lo set c up — everyrhing vou'U 
need to kno* lo stct on the air! \n ARRL PuMicaun 
Slt.Ot 

AR3292 Your Introduction to Worse Code: Ptvc- 
tftCv CuootHl Compsnu.m code course la Snw 
Van 'rr Talking- dun kit inehides two 90 minute cas 
■OJp lapet Prepare* you fur the 5 WPM Morse code 
tiara in earn ymw Novice license or add hig|i-frequi!n 
cj workfwide communieation$ privileges to tour cude 
free Tcchmtan Itcrnse $10.00 



ARRL License Manuals AH the theory you need to 
pan your ten. Complete FCC quea km pools with an- 
twets. 



ARI0B The DXCC Companion by Jim 

K.RIS spc\h oui hi ^iritplt:. straightforward terms what 

you need to be a successful DXcr. $6.00 

ARl2,itlL0fl Book Spirai $3.50 
AHA Ml Interference Handbook Written from an 
RFI .^culh's pcrNpeelive. Hii experience in solving in- 
[crfcreiicc \ uohleci is . Si 2.00 

AR2I97 Dili Book Valuable aid lo the RP design 
engineer. tcdinkLun, radio amaleur, andexperimenler. 
CommonK used Uthles. cnart^, and those hand-ItMC 
member formulas $12.00 

AR29(iu Transm*ssK>n Line Transformers (2nd 
#d.) by />. Jtrty Snick W2t~Sft Practical oesifns and 
specific inlormatHift on corstmetioD techniques and 
wurcci. of maicnal McMedeMgm fcr antenna tum-r. 
hyhndf, and far the VHF and VHF bands 272 pp 
$10,00 



AKOtlrJYncji Antenna Design Originally published 
as a tene* m Hem ttodkr . pohihtd and expanded by Df. 
Law^oo $15-00 



AK2I7I Hints «nd KJnks Fend me answer to that 
met) probtem Ideas, for setting up your gear for 
eonwttibie, ernexat opcrauoo , $s.00 



ARJI60 Qflp Clonic ■ Collection of articles from 
last 15 vearsitl ARRL publications on building MCtfr* 
ers t [ramjtutten. transceiver h accessories. 28S pp, 
$1200 



vk:"^ Techmcian Class 
ARZWi General Class 
A Ron* Advanced Class 
AR2J9 1 Extra Class 



$600 
VH 00 



AR2KJ3 Sotelkte Anthology The latest 
m OSCARs 9 through 1 3 as wcJI as me RS 
Infonnalion on the use of digital modes, lurking 
RUDAK. miorxompuicr. and more* $5,00 



AR.MS5 The Satellite Expenmenter's Hand- 
book, (2nd Ed,) by Mtrdm Daitfeff kit Hi 
Lipandrdand revised, this 2nd sfflxm i>f "The Satel- 
lite EtpcnmenieT's Handbook" is your guide to astng 
and designing satellites, focusing on those built by 
and for the international radio amateur comrriuna% 
$20.00 

AR0477 Low Band Dxing How io meet ihe chal 
lenges of the different farms of 1 60. B0, and 40 meter 
propagation with effective antennas, equipriKnt, and 
Lipcraling strategies. $10.00 

AH245n FCC Ride Book (8th ed.) A muii fur every 
active radki amateur $9.00 

A R 20.10 Your Gateway lo Packet Radio (2nd ed .) 
Tells everything you need to know about this popular 

new i tunic, hnw lo gel started, equipment you need, and 
more. $12.00 



CODE TAPES 



AR2P9B Space Almanac by AmAtomy ft. Cmrtit 
kJKXM Captures the breathtaking recent news from 
space Includes information cm Amateur Radio satd- 
laes Find ahnost evcrytlung about man's tnp to ihe 
nan %0pp 520,00 

AR20B3 Comp*ete DXer [2nd ed.) by So* t*cktr 
W9KNI Learn how to hurt DX and obtain hard to- get 
gSLcanlv $12.00 



AR2Q65 AflRL Antenna Book The new lothcdaim 
rrprrsents die best and most highly regarded infbr- 
maiion on antenna fundamentals, transmission 
lines, design t and eonstructicin of wire antennas. Over 
TIM pages, over 900 figures. An ARRL Puhitcarmn 
$20.00 

AK.VW Morse Code: The Essential Language 
hyf~ Prier Catron Jr. WJDKVhM been tvufiainled and 
revised in its 2nd edition, Peter Catron drunk ic.s Idsvi 
naling history as well as sharing prat'lti/al learning in 
fnnuuliiHi. Readers will leam how to handle distress 
i.ill.s beard nni only on inc hambands. bul on nuiriliiiie 
rtrnl aircraft frequencies. Copyright 1 99 1. MiHeovei. 
An ARRL Ihjblicaiion. $6.00 



(*nr tm%w^r u* tkr mtKvdc bfim-hti-ita is ta mat* the imtt u* umpft n* if»rn ihai ni a m /mrfrfiM. ifnruiih tftf m-iW i 
miurtt rodr f«rv — (nu i*f th>„vsands o/Hamx taur ft*irn ihrtr Itrrrwn thu ^muring new iin*1cmt mty. It 'j fvttn*e P tt *'f 
Miii jvipi* oiw obit nt irtup thriiigh ihr \emcr tr%i oftrr sprmitng tf%i thorn three htmn eorh tm Grmfiti mtd Vkt SiuAJrt 
P*afk*m^h*w frvrnmptm em\eecedtcQ*nn finite tm*4t*%Thtj&w +&^ Gni+gafier mmr General* U latxmttm 
V$€ the Ppri a>rtaiiT omrf pof 'It be there before yam imctm it A week ahtmht do a. VYanumj;. 20mpm rnde ul'muil jwiiotjMi 
*ppenn m nw mepambie. uie i rrn bie. ftewwmumem l*at* Jmtmpr Ihttit Wayme acctpn mo rVmjmmmmtitfi mhmere* foe 



7JT06 '■HKStjckh-r" $S.*S 

%+ vfaa— This is the practice tape fiat those who sur 
vived ihe 5 wpra tape, and a\ also the tape for the 
Nov ice and Technician licenses It es cnrnprised of roe 
vslidhuur of code. Characters afe sent ai 13 wpmand 
spaced at 5 wpm €a^ groups are enijrely random 
characters sent in groups of five— dcfimteh not memo 

7THD "Courageous" |5.f5 

20 1 wptn-^^gratuiations! Okay, (he ehaQeoge of 
code is what's gotten you this far, so don't outt now. Go 
for the etfra class license. We send die code faster than 

20 per lis like wearing lead wetghtfi on vuur kci *hen 
you run Yuu "1 1 wonder why the examiner is sending so 
slowly! 



75T05 "Genesis" $5.*5 

5» |— Tr^tsthe h-ra a a ai e tap^taiaigyogthfowgh 
ihe 26 letters. 10 numbers, and necessary purjctuatan. 
complete whh practice every step of the »iv The 
cane of ieammg gives ccofidknce even to the faint of 
heart. 



■'11- Back Breaker $5.05 

13 ' »pm — Code groups again, at a brisk 13+ wpm so 
yooll be realty at ease when you sn down in front of ■ 
stcdy eyed volunteer examiner who starts sending yuu 
phiin language code at only 13 per. You'll need this 
cMra nurjjm lo overcome the sheer panic universal m 
most leflt situations You've come this far, so don 'I get 
code shy now! 



20NIQ9 73 Magazine Index I960- 1990 
A complete index lo every art in I r published in 73 
Magazine through lyW. Eleven major categories, 
further subdivided into 25 individual subject areas 
provides easy access lo thousands of art teles, and a 
weallh of technical information Book $15.00 
fBM software f specify type) $20 00 

20NI 10 Product Reviews Since 1945 contains an 
index lo 3,400 product review* that have appeared in 
QST. CQ, HR r 73, and touktm Alphabetically listed 
^manufacturer Boot $12.05 

20N 106 The Easy Wtre Antenna rtandboo* by 
Oawr fmgrwm K-fTVrJ Get on! your roll of wire and 
your wire cutters, yon arc ready m go waJi this new 
practical and easy lo wnrfcra « i1 book. Gives you all of 
the aeeded dimcnswni fur a full range of easy lo build 
and erect ^sfcy wars. ' ' Covers al of the many types of 



wire iiniciiruis .ilonj; with a lot nf his antenna secrets and 
*how-t04m ,, hctoi4|IJft 

.:i ino: l No Code Ham Radio Education Package 
Cofripuler «>flwarc package. Clear, concise, and easy 
to understand Tins package Includes computer aided 
instruction software I IBM compatible), 200 page Ham 
Radio HundbtHik . and complete l-CC Part 91 Amaleur 
Radio rules and regulations. Mo prior knowledge of 
elecironicv is needed S2K.95 

20fv012BawOpera1oreducaTtionPac*a^ 
puler software ctmUkns five IBM compatible discs whh 
all questions for all license classes, plus "Morse 
Acadenty " code leachtng software that takes you frorn 
0-2D wpm Effortless and uneoniplicaaDd. eTwytrwng's 
d*ioc frtucn easy to undertianri mentis Review all ques 
tions. pnntoiasana^tcsborlakeciaiiisadinmisiend 
r^ht at rtte cornputer keyboard S2SJ5 



BOOKS FOR BEGINNERS 



MNoih Tecrtnicinn Class License Manual: Mew 
No-Code by Gordon Heir This book will cover 
c-^rythtng you need to become a Technician Clasa 
Ham. Every enact quest km and answeTon the e.\drnin,j 
lions is found in this cine hook covering element 2 and 
element 3 A quesucm piK»K Gordon West tells you the 
right answer and then i'^ plains in detail why the answer 
ii correct. Fully illustrated lew. frequency chart show- 
ing privileges, list ol e mi miners and an FCC Form 6 10 
application. $9,9S 

20N092 The Wonderful World of Ham Radio by 
Richard Sh'lmk. KB4LCS This hook addresses the 
plea thai something simple, clear, and fun be written to 
introduce young people to amateur radio Pick-up one 
for the new ham in your life, $7.95 

20N100 Electronics Build and Learn (2nd edi- 
tion) by RA Prnfptd ^mrunes rheoTy and practice so 
that you can "kam by doing. ' Full comtructjon details 
of a circuit Jeimmiir -jim unit that IS used in satHonenl 
ehaplers to uaroduce common ekctjonic csmpoiients. 
Describes now these coraponeats an built op into use- 



ful tircuAv aacillatLiT>. multivibrators, btstabtes, and 
lope CHCQMS \2$ pp , 19 photos., 72 line drawings 

$5m 

30N099 Dtgrfal Electronics Projects for Begin- 
ners by Owen Hmhup contains 1 2 digital electronic!) 
projects suitable for the beginner to buikl with the mini- 
rnu m of equ ipmc-nt , 1 28 pp. . 56 1 ine drawings . $ 1 2 .50 

AR2073 Novice Antenna Notebook A beginners 
guide to easy and e fled i vc antennae and tuners you can 

build 1tt,M Am AKKL Publication 

AK:K7I W1FB s Help for New Hams by Doug 
DcMan' WIFB ComplcEc for the newcomer. Put to- 
gether a station and get on the air. $10.00 An ARRL 
Publication, 

AR22K6 Brat Stnpt in Radio by Doug Dtblav 
W1FB Series of QST articles . See components auem 
bled into practical circuits and how the circuMS make up 
your radio gear 15,00 An ARRL Publication. 



Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf Order Form 

You may order by mail, telephone 4 or fax. All payments are to be 
in US funds. Allow 3 weeks for delivery. 



1 
I 

I 



Item* 



Title 



Qty. 



Price 



Total 



SHIPPING 

TOTAL 



SHIPPING 

U.S. add £3.00 mail, WOO UPS. 

Canada add $4.00 mall 

U.P.5. to Canada and all foreign orders FOB Peterborough* NH, 



Name 



Street 



City 



State 



Zip 



TOTAL $ 



Card* 



OAE OMC UVISA □ Check/Money Order 
Expiration Date 



Teleprrone: (603) 92+4196 (600) 234-6458 FAX: (603) 924-8613 
Mail: 73 Magazine, Attn. Untie Wayne, P0 Box 3080, Peterborough, NH 03458 

UW0592 









jfv"?'"' 



FT-1000 



FT-747GX 





Afe&B k__ 




FT-912R 




km 



FT-650 



FT-415/815 




klahoma 



otntn 



■*H» ssa rsnn isfj 



.^^fa ^LS^. ^J^L **^l 

rap KB KM fill 

ffij ' BE9I V&£ J EL^S * 




FT-470 



*/?/£/" 




FT-91 1 




STANDARD 



HV 



EE 



AUNCO TEN-TEC 



ft concepts ARRL PC Electronics 

ICOM 



Lnrsen Antennas AmeCO 



Outbacker Antennas 



■rag* 






cushcraft 



C R I* O A ( T 'Oh 



W5YI 








Nye-Viking KantroniCS M 2 ENTERPRISES 
Ramsey Kits telex hy gain Bug Catcher COMET 



SPECIAL 



SPECIAL 



CALL 



CALL TOLL 



For This Month's Special-Buy 
Some Quantities Are Limited 



a ho ma 



-800-70K-HAMS 



-800-765-4267 




FREE SHIPPING UPS SURFACE {except towers/antennas) 



9500 Cedar Lake Ave., Suite 100 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114 

Local & info (405) 478*2866 FAX (405) 478-4202 



K 



CO.D. 




MbUtlC4l.3 




&** 



Hours of Operation 

M-F10-6 

Sat 10*3 



FT-5200/6200 

Dual Band Mobiles 

Frequency Range: 
FT-5200 

2M: 140-174 MHz RX 
140-150 MH2TX 
70 cm: 430-450 MHz RX/TX 
FT-6200 

70 cm: 430-450 MHz RX/TX 
23 cm: 1240-1300 MHz RXflX 
32 Memories {1 6 per band) 
Odd splits on any memory 
CTCSS Encode Built-in 
■ Dual Receive with Balance 
Control 

Full Duplex Cross-Band 
Operation 

Built-in Antenna Duplexer 
Backlit DTMF Microphone 
Automatic 8 Level Display 
Dimmer 

Built-in Cross-Band Repeat 
RF Output Power: 
2M: 50/5 watt (high/low) 
70 cm; 35/5 watt (high/low) 
23 cm: T 071 watt (high/tow) 
Accessories: 

FRC-4 DTMF Paging Unit 
YSIML 20' Trunk Mounting 

Kit 
FTS-22 CTCSS Dual Decoder 
SP-7 External Speaker 
DVS-3 Digital Voice 

Recorder Unit 
MW-1 Wireless Microphone 

/Controller 









What weighs 5 oz.. 

lights up snaps off and 

fits in \our pocket? 



D, 




Here's another 

Yaesu exclusive! 

The MW- 1 Wireless Mic 
with Remote Control. 



on't have the answer? Yaesu does. Ifs the 
exclusive removable front control panel of the 
FT-5200/6200-the smallest, lowest priced dual-band 
mobile radios made. 

With the use of the optional adjustable control panel 
bracket kit. you can convenient I v mount the "smallest" 
control panel almost anyplace in your car and mount the 
transceiver body out of sight. When you leave your car, 
snap otT the 5 oz. front control panel and take it with 
you. Now your rig's secure. For safer autopatch 
operation at night, you'll find another Yaesu exclusive - 
a back-lit DTMF mic. And there's also a built-in anten- 
na duplexer and easy-to-read dual full-frequency liquid 
crystal display. 

Now you have the answer, too. The FT-5200 - 
packed with features, aflfordably priced. Don't have 
one? Better contact your dealer today! 






Performance without compromise. 



SM 



Specif canons subject to change without notice. 



© 1992 Yassu USA, 17210 Edwards Road, Cerntos. CA 90701 (310) 404-2700 
guaranteed dp!, iMQ Mfeur bauds Some iGMMOffetwtffal 00 Wis ^ standard r ;.-';> J ' ar-as Chad I ft yOtf local fwm 







• 



I 



■ 



I 



No competition class transceiver 
is even in the same ballpark as the 
TS 850S- 

You'll find a superior intermod- 
ulation dynamic mnty* nf 10?; rlli 
throughout the entire 100 kHz to 
30 MHz range. 

Kenwood's optional DSP- 100 
Digital Signal Processor (DSP) 
converts audio signals to digital 
information, where it 15; shaped 
and processed by a micropro- 
cessor For SSB work, this means 
a cleaner signal, and for CW, it 
allows adjustment of the rise and 
fall times for optimum waveshape. 
The DSP- 100 also works at the 



receiver detector level for audio 
shaping, in all mode:.. 

Other advanced technology * r ' 
theTS 850S includes 10 Hz step 
dual VFOs, multi-mode scanning, 
full and semi break in CW, superior 
interference reduction, keyer, dual 
noise blanker, and RIT/XIT 100 
memory channels store, transmit, 
and receive frequencies indepen- 
dently High boost for SSB signal 
"punch V Microphone supplied. 

The Kenwood TS-B50S, All 
band. All mode. One year warranty. 
In a class by itself! 

Key options, 

DSP- 100 Digital Signal Processor 



AT 300 ifio io m *zterfl£Jintef*na tune 

AT 8 SO 160 10 Mj internal *uiU'um\ tttftti 

DRU-2 fewiaai digital mcordtng unit 

lF'2'A2C<.ornp*tivt\nu*Tix>t- PG-2X 

U< cable PS-52 fViw^r \rippfy $0-2 1 

TOCO 5P31 Matching externaUp*akei 

VS-2Vrm:e.yntfi-.r/^r YG-455C I T Mi 
Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF YC-455CN-, 
250 Hz CW filter for 455 kHz IF YK-88C 
500 Hi CW filter far 8 83 MHz IF 
YK-88CN 1 *70 Hz CW Rltei for 8 ?53 ] 
MHz IF. YK 88SN 1 I 8 kHz SSB filter 
8,83 MHz IR 

KENWOOD USA. CORPORATION j 

COMMUNICATIONS ft TEST EOUIPME NT GROU 
P.O. BOX 22745. 2201 E Dominguaj Stroof 
Long Beach, 0A 90901-5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INCj 

P O BOX 1075, 959 Gana Courl ! 

Mississauga. Ontario. Canada L4T 4G2 



KENWOOD 



*A|, n|f 



*IAt f^ 



POWBfl 



r " AJ ' -'tifeltt tlfltVr ' 









'Hi 



/ 



POWEF* 



•■ « r • a is- ■ ■ 

III 



Km * WW, 



Mir^ 



KENWOOD 



** Tfcitscsr/^ 



tor, 



a tMpnjfAi> f '> - 



ft I I r'Jf 



fipr^Jf -3 






*.!* + 



tH.E5Q.un 



f'F'TJ'. 



WJfr 



^> 


« 


1 1 


S* A f T 


KJ* fl 


^~~" 






1 
ci>T. 


j ■ 

. 1 


9 






^'J** 


1 


6 


F - 


AM 




~" "* 


fait 


f '* 


:c / 


' 


'fin 


' 


1] 


w 


-ST,T- 




M ■ 



pilMf , _«>. mmui w< r - '"> fWH 







''.# *- 



Jfrfr 



, , j,, r.,, . 








i it fit m '.ttttttrttt I'tttltti